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Size of breastmilk bottles?? And a donor milk question.

Posted by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 9:39 AM
  • 12 Replies
I know the 'rule' is 1-1.25oz per hour but I also heard that bottles should never be more than 3oz. So what happens when she sleeps 4-5 hours? Should I give 4-5oz or just the 3? She usually eats around 9:30PM, goes to sleep, wakes up to eat around 2:30, then sleeps until 6:30/7:00. This is her natural
'schedule' that she has had pretty much since birth. I don't want to starve her but I don't want to stretch out her tummy either!!

Also, does it matter what age the milk is created for, so to speak? For example, my baby is 6 WEEKS old and I have some donor milk from a mom who has a 17 MONTH old. Does the age difference matter?
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by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 9:39 AM
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Replies (1-10):
larissalarie
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 9:50 AM
I would still stick with 3 ounces at most. If she needs more, she will wake sooner.
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mom2cuteez
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 9:54 AM

I wonder this too.  I find that I am pumping 4 oz or more when I pump and he empties me out when I feed him from the breast.  So, I am assuming that sometimes my lo does get more than 3 oz. I keep him on the breast as long as he wants, and until he is done.   When I bottle feed him he wants more and keeps it all down if I feed him 4oz or 4 1/2 if he goes longer.  So I am not so sure I agree with this.  If I feed him 3 oz...burp him play with him or try to occupy him he screams for more and roots around etc.  Even when I give a paci to hold him off.  He definitely wants more.  I will probably be the minority here, but I would go with 4 oz if you are feeding longer.  Good luck!

YzmaRocks
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 9:59 AM
1 mom liked this
Pumping really isn't an indication of how much baby eats. I have pumped 15+oz in one sitting before. I highly doubt she was really eating that much!

Quoting mom2cuteez:

I wonder this too.  I find that I am pumping 4 oz or more when I pump and he empties me out when I feed him from the breast.  So, I am assuming that sometimes my lo does get more than 3 oz. I keep him on the breast as long as he wants, and until he is done.   When I bottle feed him he wants more and keeps it all down if I feed him 4oz or 4 1/2 if he goes longer.  So I am not so sure I agree with this.  If I feed him 3 oz...burp him play with him or try to occupy him he screams for more and roots around etc.  Even when I give a paci to hold him off.  He definitely wants more.  I will probably be the minority here, but I would go with 4 oz if you are feeding longer.  Good luck!

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Daynaof3
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 10:00 AM

 4 oz. would be top limit imo, I would not suggest any larger than that.

Also, baby not spitting isn't a reliable way to gauge overfeeding. Do we vomit everytime we overeat? No, we feel like crap and need to lay down, may even need a nap but we don't vomit. If we do vomit, we have eaten so much more than our stomach can handle that it HAD to come out! Overfeeding happens even without vomitting. Be careful of that, but 4 oz. should be okay especially if baby is over 1 month old.

Quoting mom2cuteez:

I wonder this too.  I find that I am pumping 4 oz or more when I pump and he empties me out when I feed him from the breast.  So, I am assuming that sometimes my lo does get more than 3 oz. I keep him on the breast as long as he wants, and until he is done.   When I bottle feed him he wants more and keeps it all down if I feed him 4oz or 4 1/2 if he goes longer.  So I am not so sure I agree with this.  If I feed him 3 oz...burp him play with him or try to occupy him he screams for more and roots around etc.  Even when I give a paci to hold him off.  He definitely wants more.  I will probably be the minority here, but I would go with 4 oz if you are feeding longer.  Good luck!

 

tansyflower
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 10:02 AM

as for the donor milk, it is still perfectly fine to give the baby milk that is not the same gestational age....in fact its a way better option than giving formula.  but if its donor milk from a 6 week old that you are using on an older child it probably wont have the same fat content so they may just get hungry a little sooner because it will digest faster.  even that though varies from donor to donor. 

i had some moms donate milk to me that had really fatty milk at 8 weeks old, while other moms had milk that was really thin at a year.  i think part of it may have had to do with when they were pumping for instance if they were pumping after they nursed they were probably expressing more hindmilk.  and if i was getting milk from a mom who had aol and was pumping before she nursed i was probably getting mostly foremilk.  regardless it is a blessing to have ANY breastmilk to supplement to dont worry too much about it and just use the oldest stuff first so it doesnt expire before you get to it :)

Daynaof3
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 10:03 AM

 Op, 4oz. would be tops once baby is over 1 month. I would look for a donor with a baby closer to your childs age if possible but at least under 1 year if not. Does that mean that it's bad for your baby to get the 17 month olds milk, no. Give what you have and do what you can, you are doing great!

maggiemom2000
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 10:05 AM

Breast Versus Bottle: How much milk should baby take?

Q: Why does my breastfed baby take at most 4 ounces (120 mL) from the bottle when my neighbor’s formula-fed baby takes 7 or 8 ounces (210-240 mL)? Am I doing something wrong?

A: You are not doing anything wrong. And in this case, more is not necessarily better. Formula-fed babies typically consume much more milk at each feeding than breastfed babies, but they are also more likely to grow into overweight children and adults.1,2 One large study (16,755 babies in Belarus) compared feeding volumes in formula-fed and breastfed babies and found that the formula-fed babies consumed 49% more milk at 1 month, 57% at 3 months, and 71% at 5 months.3 Australian research found that between 1 and 6 months of age breastfed babies consistently take on average around 3 ounces (90mL) at a feeding. (Younger babies with smaller tummies take less milk.)

Breastfed babies’ milk intake doesn’t increase from months 1 to 6 because their growth rate slows.4 As growth slows, breastfed babies continue to get bigger and heavier on about the same daily milk intake, averaging about 25 ounces (750 mL) per 24 hours.

Why do formula-fed babies drink so much more milk? There are several reasons:

The bottle flows more consistently. During the first 3 to 4 months of life, after swallowing, an inborn reflex automatically triggers suckling.5 Milk flows more consistently from the bottle than the breast (which has a natural ebb and flow due to milk ejections, or let-downs), so babies tend to consume more milk from the bottle at a feeding. Before this reflexive suckling is outgrown, babies fed by bottle are at greater risk of overfeeding.

Breastfeeding gives babies more control over milk intake. Not seeing how much milk is in the breast makes a breastfeeding mother less likely to coax her baby to continue after he’s full.3,6 As the breastfed baby grows and thrives, his mother learns to trust her baby to take what he needs from both breast and bottle and also solid foods when they are introduced later. One U.K. study found that between 6 and 12 months of age breastfeeding mothers put less pressure on their babies to eat solid foods and were more sensitive to their babies’ cues.7

More milk in the bottle means more milk consumed. In the Belarus study mentioned before, babies took more formula at feedings when their mothers offered bottles containing more than 6 ounces (180 mL).3

Mother’s milk and formula are metabolized differently. Formula-fed babies use the nutrients in formula less efficiently,8 so they may need more milk to meet their nutritional needs. Formula is also missing hormones, such as leptin and adiponectin, which help babies regulate appetite and energy metabolism.9,10 Even babies’ sleep metabolism is affected, with formula-fed babies burning more calories during sleep than breastfed babies.11

Q: If my baby takes more milk from the bottle than I can express at one sitting, does that mean my milk production is low?

A: See the previous answer. Babies commonly take more milk from the bottle than they do from the breast. The fast, consistent milk flow of the bottle makes overfeeding more likely. So if your baby takes more milk from the bottle than you express, by itself this is not an indicator of low milk production.

To reduce the amount of expressed milk needed and to decrease the risk of overfeeding, take steps to slow milk flow during bottle-feeding:

  • Use the slowest flow nipple/teat the baby will accept.
  • Suggest the feeder try holding the baby in a more upright position with the bottle horizontal to slow flow and help the baby feel full on less milk.
  • Short breaks during bottle-feeding can also help baby “realize” he’s full before he takes more milk than needed.

Used with Permission. Article originally appeared on the website Breastfeeding Reporter (http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/), where you can find complete article licensing information.

FLmommy0204
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 10:06 AM

If you sleep a full night do you eat more in the morning than you would at lunch or dinner?   No, probably not.  Baby doesn't either.  Keep the bottles the same.  If baby gets hungry, he/she will ask for more sooner after eating. 

mom2cuteez
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 10:51 AM

True...so sorry!  I didn't mean to offend or upset anyone.  I was just curious.  I know I am emptied every time he is to breast.  We are regulated now that I have been breastfeeding for several weeks, so I never pump more than 6 oz at a time.  And that is only through the night.  Most all feedings are about 2-4oz.  I am truly sorry.  

Quoting YzmaRocks:

Pumping really isn't an indication of how much baby eats. I have pumped 15+oz in one sitting before. I highly doubt she was really eating that much!

Quoting mom2cuteez:

I wonder this too.  I find that I am pumping 4 oz or more when I pump and he empties me out when I feed him from the breast.  So, I am assuming that sometimes my lo does get more than 3 oz. I keep him on the breast as long as he wants, and until he is done.   When I bottle feed him he wants more and keeps it all down if I feed him 4oz or 4 1/2 if he goes longer.  So I am not so sure I agree with this.  If I feed him 3 oz...burp him play with him or try to occupy him he screams for more and roots around etc.  Even when I give a paci to hold him off.  He definitely wants more.  I will probably be the minority here, but I would go with 4 oz if you are feeding longer.  Good luck!


YzmaRocks
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 10:53 AM
No offense taken :)

Quoting mom2cuteez:

True...so sorry!  I didn't mean to offend or upset anyone.  I was just curious.  I know I am emptied every time he is to breast.  We are regulated now that I have been breastfeeding for several weeks, so I never pump more than 6 oz at a time.  And that is only through the night.  Most all feedings are about 2-4oz.  I am truly sorry.  


Quoting YzmaRocks:

Pumping really isn't an indication of how much baby eats. I have pumped 15+oz in one sitting before. I highly doubt she was really eating that much!



Quoting mom2cuteez:

I wonder this too.  I find that I am pumping 4 oz or more when I pump and he empties me out when I feed him from the breast.  So, I am assuming that sometimes my lo does get more than 3 oz. I keep him on the breast as long as he wants, and until he is done.   When I bottle feed him he wants more and keeps it all down if I feed him 4oz or 4 1/2 if he goes longer.  So I am not so sure I agree with this.  If I feed him 3 oz...burp him play with him or try to occupy him he screams for more and roots around etc.  Even when I give a paci to hold him off.  He definitely wants more.  I will probably be the minority here, but I would go with 4 oz if you are feeding longer.  Good luck!


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