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Increase milk supply HELP ME PLEASE!!!

Posted by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:41 PM
  • 22 Replies

I am looking to increase my supply I have been trying my hardest to drink more water!! My little one is going to be 5 months old on monday and I had 6 walmart bags of supply in my freezers and now I have 1 please help as to what else I can do without having to buy things to try!! I am going to start trying to pump more tomorrow and throughout the weeks to come

Any help that you have will be greatly accepted

by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:41 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mommy_4509
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:44 PM
The only thing I can suggest is pump every 2 hours to make ur breasts bring in more milk and to try a supplement called fenugreek .
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jmichael313
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:45 PM
i wish you the best of luck! my LO hs just turned 3 months and since going back to work i have struggled with my supply. i drink 2 gallons of water a day and have also tried fengreek capsules.
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larissalarie
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:53 PM
Why do you think your supply is low? Are you exclusively pumping?
I know a lot of woken take Fenugreek & ear oatmeal to help raise their supply...but that only works if you're supply is truly low.
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Cassondra09
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:55 PM

I am pumping about 4 to 6 times a day and getting anywhere from 4 to 6 oz each time except in the morning when I get almost 12 oz

Cassondra09
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:58 PM

where can u get the fenugreek supplements just in case i need to go to tha

OrionsMyBabyman
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:58 PM
Ok then you are pumping in 6 sessions what your baby needs to take in all day. I don't think you have a supply problem at all.. what makes you think so?

Are you feeding from the breast or only pumping? If the baby is getting bottles, are the bottles too big? That's my guess.


Quoting Cassondra09:

I am pumping about 4 to 6 times a day and getting anywhere from 4 to 6 oz each time except in the morning when I get almost 12 oz

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maggiemom2000
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 6:59 PM
2 moms liked this

Are you exclusivley pumping? Are you not pumping enough milk for work?

Dinking more water will not help to boost your supply. The best way to increase your supply is to nurse more. Then nurse more, and more! Offer both breasts 2 times at every feeding (nurse as long as baby wants on side one, offer side 2, nurse as long as baby wants on side 2, then offer side one again, etc.)

If you have been taking milk from your freezer every day, THAT is why your supply has dropped. Here's an article for you:

Smart use of your Freezer Stash

Everyone talks about having a terrific freezer stash ready for when you go back to work, but the freezer stash deserves a bit more discussion than just “more is better”. A lot of thought should go into how this frozen milk is used once you return to work.

Let’s start with my story – when my son was 6 months old, I started to have trouble pumping enough for him at daycare. But I had this great freezer stash, so I figured I was all set, I’d just send in extra milk from the freezer until my supply came back up. I was just adding about 2oz/day to what I was pumping the day before, but I just couldn’t get my supply back up. I was still pumping as often as I had been before my supply dropped – what the heck was going on? I was proud that my son was still getting 100% breastmilk, and thought I had been doing OK. I was determined not to give my son formula because of a family history of milk allergies, so I called a lactation consultant to ask what else I could give him – a little rice milk? I even considered goat’s milk. My freezer stash was dwindling rapidly at the rate of 2oz/day, and I couldn’t see any way to build it back up!

The LC asked me a bunch of questions about how much I was pumping and how much he was eating, and after talking with her for about an hour about what I needed to do, I finally figured it out!

Here’s what I learned. Every day that I was sending milk to daycare from the freezer stash I was telling my body that I needed 2oz less to feed my son. However, my son wasn’t getting the message that he needed 2oz less to eat – because he was still eating the same amount! So his demand was outstripping my supply by 2oz every day that I went to work and pulled one of those precious bags from the freezer! It’s pretty easy to play this out to its natural conclusion if you think about it. Your body isn’t getting a signal that it should be making more milk; you keep taking milk from the freezer and not putting any in, and gradually the freezer stash diminishes till it’s gone – then what? Unfortunately, most moms recognize the problem when the freezer stash is almost gone, not when they start using it – which is when the real problem starts, the problem of a supply-demand imbalance.

So, What’s the darn freezer stash for, anyway? Here are some examples:

  • You leave all your milk sitting out on the counter overnight and have to toss it
  • You spill a whole bottle down your best suit while pumping (the dry cleaning is a separate issue!)
  • Your daycare has just heated and started a bottle as you arrive, and that whole bottle has to be tossed so you can nurse (the far better choice, and a good use for the freezer stash).
  • You go out and really tie one on at the bars, and want to pump and dump and feed your baby a bottle instead of getting her tipsy.
  • You miss pumping one day, you know you’ll pump enough the next day, and you just have to add a little bit to cover. Caution: here starts the slippery slope! Pump extra the next day so this doesn’t get to be a habit (see above).

So – the next time you’re ready to reach for milk from the freezer, think about addressing the real issue first – that you’re not pumping enough. There are plenty of ways to fix this, but most involve a little ‘tough love’, and a cooperative daycare provider can be a big help. See Supply Boosters for lots of tips on increasing the amount you pump (or decreasing the amount you need to...)

mandankurt
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 7:01 PM

I took Fenugreek and I did a marathon pump everynight before bed for a week straight and it shot my milk supply straight up. For a marathon pump I would sit on the couch and put on a show that was an hour long, I'd pump for 10 mins and then stop during the commercials, pump again...etc etc

maggiemom2000
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 7:01 PM


Quoting Cassondra09:

I am pumping about 4 to 6 times a day and getting anywhere from 4 to 6 oz each time except in the morning when I get almost 12 oz

That is huge output! That is a 24 hour supplyl for a baby. Are you exclusivley pumping? IF you are exclusivley pumping and need more milk then first make sure you are not over feeding, then just add a couple of more pumping sessions. Most exclusivley pumping moms need to pump 8 times a day to maintain a full supply.

Breast Versus Bottle: How much milk should baby take?

Q: Why does my breastfed baby take at most 4 ounces (120 mL) from the bottle when my neighbor’s formula-fed baby takes 7 or 8 ounces (210-240 mL)? Am I doing something wrong?

A: You are not doing anything wrong. And in this case, more is not necessarily better. Formula-fed babies typically consume much more milk at each feeding than breastfed babies, but they are also more likely to grow into overweight children and adults.1,2 One large study (16,755 babies in Belarus) compared feeding volumes in formula-fed and breastfed babies and found that the formula-fed babies consumed 49% more milk at 1 month, 57% at 3 months, and 71% at 5 months.3 Australian research found that between 1 and 6 months of age breastfed babies consistently take on average around 3 ounces (90mL) at a feeding. (Younger babies with smaller tummies take less milk.)

Breastfed babies’ milk intake doesn’t increase from months 1 to 6 because their growth rate slows.4 As growth slows, breastfed babies continue to get bigger and heavier on about the same daily milk intake, averaging about 25 ounces (750 mL) per 24 hours.

Why do formula-fed babies drink so much more milk? There are several reasons:

The bottle flows more consistently. During the first 3 to 4 months of life, after swallowing, an inborn reflex automatically triggers suckling.5 Milk flows more consistently from the bottle than the breast (which has a natural ebb and flow due to milk ejections, or let-downs), so babies tend to consume more milk from the bottle at a feeding. Before this reflexive suckling is outgrown, babies fed by bottle are at greater risk of overfeeding.

Breastfeeding gives babies more control over milk intake. Not seeing how much milk is in the breast makes a breastfeeding mother less likely to coax her baby to continue after he’s full.3,6 As the breastfed baby grows and thrives, his mother learns to trust her baby to take what he needs from both breast and bottle and also solid foods when they are introduced later. One U.K. study found that between 6 and 12 months of age breastfeeding mothers put less pressure on their babies to eat solid foods and were more sensitive to their babies’ cues.7

More milk in the bottle means more milk consumed. In the Belarus study mentioned before, babies took more formula at feedings when their mothers offered bottles containing more than 6 ounces (180 mL).3

Mother’s milk and formula are metabolized differently. Formula-fed babies use the nutrients in formula less efficiently,8 so they may need more milk to meet their nutritional needs. Formula is also missing hormones, such as leptin and adiponectin, which help babies regulate appetite and energy metabolism.9,10 Even babies’ sleep metabolism is affected, with formula-fed babies burning more calories during sleep than breastfed babies.11

Q: If my baby takes more milk from the bottle than I can express at one sitting, does that mean my milk production is low?

A: See the previous answer. Babies commonly take more milk from the bottle than they do from the breast. The fast, consistent milk flow of the bottle makes overfeeding more likely. So if your baby takes more milk from the bottle than you express, by itself this is not an indicator of low milk production.

To reduce the amount of expressed milk needed and to decrease the risk of overfeeding, take steps to slow milk flow during bottle-feeding:

  • Use the slowest flow nipple/teat the baby will accept.
  • Suggest the feeder try holding the baby in a more upright position with the bottle horizontal to slow flow and help the baby feel full on less milk.
  • Short breaks during bottle-feeding can also help baby “realize” he’s full before he takes more milk than needed.
SunflowerMom10
by on Nov. 26, 2011 at 7:06 PM
Nurse as much as your lo will let you! Eat balanced meals try drinking a glass of water everytime you nurse. Other than that I'd try mothers milk tea and brewers yeast. That should make your supply increase.
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