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Solids. Mush or bites

Posted by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 5:04 AM
  • 18 Replies
After researching I was planning on baby led solids & until now DH was behind me. But DD is 5 months & goes ballistic if we are eating. For now I've been giving her a spoon to munch & that seems to work for a few minutes.

So can put stuff in her own mouth. But she can't yet sit up on her own.

DH wants to start her with purees like we did DS. I am torn.

I still don't plan on starting solids until 6 months. But have to show good cause as to why I'm leaning towards baby led other than its easier as DH doesn't come home from work until far after meal times on weekdays.

For every link I come up with about baby led he comes up with another about purees (homemade not canned/bottled).
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by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 5:04 AM
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littlecheifsmom
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 7:58 AM

what we did was breast milk ice cubes in a mesh feeder. then added bowels spoons and a few meal time only toys with ds. sometimes i would add a puree of fruit or veggie like 1/2 teaspoon to the breast milk then freeze it for different tastes.they now have little baby popsicle handles at babies r us/target/walmart if you dont like the mesh feeders.

mama02040608
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 10:55 AM
1 mom liked this
I think either method is valid but there has been new evidence (I think Tabi had it on her FB page) that BLW babies end up less likely to be obese, since they self regulate their intake. I always did a little purees and then went to table food pretty quick. Never got to the "stage 3" foods, so to speak. I'm leaning more towards BLW lately, since it seems more in line with what we are "supposed to" do. After all, there was no gerber in caveman days. They just made their foods more manageable.
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maggiemom2000
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 1:43 PM
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http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_121648.html

Letting Baby Eat Finger Foods May Spur Healthier Weight

Babies who are spoon-fed purees more likely to prefer sweets, become overweight, study says

By Mary Elizabeth Dallas
Tuesday, February 7, 2012
HealthDay news image

Related MedlinePlus Pages

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Allowing babies who are being weaned to feed themselves with finger foods rather than spoon-feeding the baby with pureed foods may reduce their risk for obesity later on, according to new research.

The study, which included 155 children aged 20 months to 6.5 years, found that those who were allowed to feed themselves were more likely to eat a healthier diet and maintain a normal weight as they got older.

The researchers questioned parents about their children's weaning style and food preferences. Of the children followed, 63 were spoon-fed and 92 were allowed to feed themselves ("baby-led" weaning).

According to the results, published online Feb. 7 in BMJ Open, the spoon-fed babies were more likely to become overweight than the babies who had fed themselves. These findings did not appear to be due to other factors that play a role in children's weight, such as birth weight, parents' weight or economic status, the researchers noted.

The study also revealed that children in the baby-led group liked carbohydrates best, while the spoon-fed babies preferred sweet foods. The researchers said, however, the babies who ate spoon-fed purees were offered carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, proteins and whole meals, such as lasagna, more often than the other children.

"Our study suggests that baby-led weaning has a positive impact on the liking for foods that form the building blocks of healthy nutrition, such as carbohydrates," Ellen Townsend of the school of psychology at the University of Nottingham in England, and her colleague wrote in their report. "This has implications for combating the well-documented rise of obesity in contemporary societies."

The texture and presentation of finger foods, particularly carbohydrates, probably played a role in the study results, the investigators noted in a journal news release.

SOURCE: BMJ journals, news release, Feb. 3, 2012

maggiemom2000
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 1:44 PM
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https://breastfeedingusa.org/content/article/good-foods-babies

Good Foods for Babies

NOTE: This article is the second of a series about introducing solids and weaning. You may want to read the previous article first: When is the Best Time to Start My Baby on Foods Other Than Breastmilk? The final article in this series is:Thinking About Weaning?

As her baby approached his six month birthday, Joanna had lots of questions about starting her breastfed baby on other foods.

“Those jars of baby food are cute but so expensive. Besides, I would really prefer to feed my baby fresh food. Is it difficult to make your own baby food?"

It is very easy to make your own baby food and much cheaper, too. You do not even need special equipment, just a knife, fork and spoon.

“What are some good “starter” foods?”

Most babies like soft fruits and veggies. You can put tiny pieces of ripe banana on his tray, so he can pick them up and feed himself while you eat your dinner. Sweet potatoes are great for babies. Just scrub and prick the skin of the potato and bake it in the microwave until it is soft. After it has cooled down, you can throw away the skin and cut up the soft potato into little chunks.

“I have never heard of babies feeding themselves! I thought you had to feed them with little spoons!”

We used to think it was a good idea to start babies on solid foods when they were very young, maybe even just a few weeks old. Of course, babies that age could only eat pureed foods, which their mothers fed them with spoons. Now we know that babies are not ready for solid foods until they can sit up by themselves and use a pincer grasp with their fingers and thumbs. By that time, they can eat all kinds of things with only a little help from you. Your baby may like sitting in a high chair to eat, or he may prefer to sit on your lap or on the floor.

“Why do so many babies start with cereal?”

Cereal may be traditional, but it is not necessarily one of the best first foods. Iron-fortified rice cereal has been suggested as a first food in the past because of the belief that it was “hypoallergenic” and was a good source of iron. A review of research by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) finds those reasons to be invalid. 1 Newer thinking suggests beginning with foods that are naturally nutrient-rich. For example, meat is naturally rich in iron and zinc. In any case, breastfed babies usually get all the iron they need from their mother's milk up until at least six months of age. 2 If your doctor is concerned about iron levels, a simple blood test can be done right in the office.

“So what else could I feed my baby?”

Lots of things! Just make sure the food is soft enough not to catch in his throat and that it is cut into little pieces. So, for example, you will want to offer cooked, not raw, carrots, green beans, and peas.

  • Try ripe avocados, pears, peaches or apples – whatever is in season.
  • Beans can be mashed after the skins have been removed.
  • If you eat meat, you can offer little pieces of chicken or maybe a meaty leg bone (with that thin sliver of attached bone removed).
  • Tofu is an easy, soft food for a meat-free family with no soy allergies.
  • As he gets closer to a year, your baby may also like to gnaw on a heel of whole wheat bread or a piece of bagel.

“Are there foods I should avoid feeding to my baby?”

  • Don't give her anything that could get stuck in her throat, so avoid hard foods like popcorn and nuts and sticky foods like peanut butter.
  • Any “round” foods, like carrots slices or grapes, should be cut into quarters.
  • You may have heard that you should delay potentially allergenic foods, and you may have seen lists of such foods. Current research suggests that there is no benefit or reduction in the development of allergies due to delaying certain foods. 1
  • Never give honey to a baby until he is over a year old because of the risk of botulism (food poisoning).
  • If there are any foods or drinks to which members of your family are allergic or sensitive, talk with your health care provider before offering them to your baby.

“How much food does he need? How many times a day should I feed him?”

Start slowly, just once a day. If you miss a day, don't worry. Table foods may be offered whenever it is most convenient. It is not necessary to stick to a strict daily schedule. At first he will mostly play with his food. If any of it gets in his mouth, consider it a bonus! Start with about a teaspoon of food and add more when he asks for it. You might want to put an old shower curtain under his chair to catch the crumbs. Wait about a week before introducing each new food. That way it will be easy to see if anything upsets his stomach or gives him a rash.

“What about juices? Won't he need extra water too?”

Whole fruits contain fiber and are much more nutritious than juices. It makes sense to either limit juices or even avoid them completely. Some mothers like to offer a little water in a sippy cup with meals.

“Wow, I am excited to start! But I was wondering, if I start on other foods, won't he nurse less often? I don't want to lose my milk, and I am not ready to stop nursing.”

Your milk remains the most important part of your baby's diet until he is about a year old. Always nurse him before offering other foods and afterwards as well if he is interested. Nursing before offering solids will both ensure that baby gets enough breastmilk and maintain your milk production.

Babies need only their mother’s milk for about the first six months. Your baby will continue to receive the same nutrition and protection from your milk as long as you continue to nurse.

The continuing protection from illness is important for your baby, because when babies become more mobile, they are toddling around and picking up all kinds of germs, some of which go straight into their mouths.

It is fun to see your baby begin to explore the different tastes and textures of various foods.

You may also like to read:

Baby Led Weaning and More on Baby Led Weaning http://www.babyledweaning.com/

Whole Foods for Babies and Toddlers by Margaret Kenda

Mash and Smash Cookbook by Marian Buck-Murray

Sugar-Free Toddlers by Susan Watson

My Child Won't Eat! by Carlos González, MD

References:
1. American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition. Pediatric News, November 2009: “Rice Cereal Can Wait, Let Then Eat Meat First: AAP committee has changes in mind”

2. Raj, S et al. “A prospective study of iron status in exclusively breastfed term infants up to 6 months of age”, International Breastfeeding Journal, 2007.

fahmom
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 3:05 PM
I would skip purees altogether. At least that is what we will do with our next. My son is 10.5 months old and does well with finger foods and often eats from our plates. When he ate purses he was always more interested in the spoon itself than anything that was on it. He has always shown interst in our plates of food since about the same age as your LO. I think it is only curiosity that your LO is grabbing and seemingly interested in your plate. I would do what another post suggested and try breastmilk popsicles in a mesh feeder. My son will not take one now but he loved it when he was teething and had 4 top teeth erupting all at once.
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Rhodin
by Bronze Member on Feb. 12, 2012 at 3:28 PM

You can do both at the same time.  DD fed herself purees, especially at Grandma's, where they still cut her grapes into quarters even though she's almost 2 and has eaten whole ones supervised.  I always made sure to send an old vinyl tablecloth along because a 6 month old eating pureed peas with her bare hands has quite the blast radius.

comf
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 3:58 PM
Are you putting her in a high chair while you eat? You said giving her a spoon , does she have a bowl too or a plate?
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MumsTheWord571
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 5:23 PM
I'm working on the high chair. She stands in my lap for now. I have to find all of the parts to the high chair lol. Right now she only has the spoon.


Quoting comf:

Are you putting her in a high chair while you eat? You said giving her a spoon , does she have a bowl too or a plate?

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tansyflower
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 5:33 PM

hmmm i waited til my son was closer to ten months to start solid food but he had really bad swallowing issues.  he had tastes of food before then but actual eating on a regular basis was something we held off on for a long time.  i never really purred my foods, i just kind of prechewed whatever was on my plate or mushed it up and would stick a little bit in his mouth and then after a while let him put it in his mouth (which we had to watch VERY carefully since he choked so easily).

gdiamante
by Gina on Feb. 12, 2012 at 5:43 PM


Quoting MumsTheWord571:

After researching I was planning on baby led solids & until now DH was behind me. But DD is 5 months & goes ballistic if we are eating. For now I've been giving her a spoon to munch & that seems to work for a few minutes.

So can put stuff in her own mouth. But she can't yet sit up on her own.
Can she sit well when supported? If not, THAT trumps all and she MAY NOT have solids yet.

 DH wants to start her with purees like we did DS. I am torn.

I still don't plan on starting solids until 6 months. But have to show good cause as to why I'm leaning towards baby led other than its easier as DH doesn't come home from work until far after meal times on weekdays.
There is recent research that says baby led weaning = less risk of obesity. Of course, it occurs to me to do what you want when he's not home. If he wants to do purees, HE can make them when HE is home. It's a compromise.


For every link I come up with about baby led he comes up with another about purees (homemade not canned/bottled).


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