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Leaving for the weekend, whats going to happen to my LO and nursing.

Posted by on Mar. 1, 2012 at 11:55 PM
  • 15 Replies

 I'm in the military and i go back to drill weekends this month and normally i would just go to the armory and go home at night and be with her from at least 6pm to 6 or 7am. but the first month back we are going to the range for weapon qualifcation, so ill be away from 6pm fri to late sun. now this is at the end of the month so im trying to pump hard core to have enough for the whole weekend which is uping my supply too. but my worries are

1) how will my lo react to, no nursing to sleep. daddy will be watching her but he almost never puts her to bed unless he is carrying her in after i feed her. and she hasnt fallen asleep without me feeding her longer then maybe an hour. im really worried for SO.

2) im not sure i will have enough oppurtunities to pump while im away. i will be dealing with the military. they are not to caring about woman let alone a breastfeeding mom. i know people will say its the law but come on its the military, they will try to provide the best they can but all in all together we can only do what we can. so in 3 days could my supply drop if i can only pump every 4ish hours? and how horrible are my first few days back with my dd going to be, nursing all the time, im assuming?

PLZ help!!!

by on Mar. 1, 2012 at 11:55 PM
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Replies (1-10):
larissalarie
by Platinum Member on Mar. 2, 2012 at 12:04 AM
How old is your baby? That will matter to a degree, but no nursing relationship can be destroyed in a weekend :-) Absolute worst case scenario is that your supply drops and baby develops a bottle preference. That's unlikely, but if so you just be more stubborn than baby. More likely is that baby is delighted to see you and attached to your boobs for a few days after you get back!
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louise1212
by on Mar. 2, 2012 at 12:27 AM

 she will be 12 weeks next week, so by the time i go to drill she will be almost 4 months. but i know that with me uping my supply to pump enough while im gone, will probably cause for more pain when i cant pump as much as i would like at drill.

Quoting larissalarie:

How old is your baby? That will matter to a degree, but no nursing relationship can be destroyed in a weekend :-) Absolute worst case scenario is that your supply drops and baby develops a bottle preference. That's unlikely, but if so you just be more stubborn than baby. More likely is that baby is delighted to see you and attached to your boobs for a few days after you get back!

 

GoodyBrook
by Silver Member on Mar. 2, 2012 at 1:01 AM
Can you take a manual pump with you and pump where you stand every 4 hours? No need for electricity if you're in the field. And pumping and dumping is better than not pumping at all if you can't put the milk in the fridge for over 12 hours. (Just how "in the field" are you going to be?) This will be a great bonding experience for you LO and SO! He'll do great!
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Mar. 2, 2012 at 1:06 AM


Quoting louise1212:

 I'm in the military and i go back to drill weekends this month and normally i would just go to the armory and go home at night and be with her from at least 6pm to 6 or 7am. but the first month back we are going to the range for weapon qualifcation, so ill be away from 6pm fri to late sun. now this is at the end of the month so im trying to pump hard core to have enough for the whole weekend which is uping my supply too. but my worries are

First... thank you for your service.

1) how will my lo react to, no nursing to sleep. daddy will be watching her but he almost never puts her to bed unless he is carrying her in after i feed her. and she hasnt fallen asleep without me feeding her longer then maybe an hour. im really worried for SO.

More than likely she'll do fine if you're not around. Might make dad a bit miserable but he can handle it.

2) im not sure i will have enough oppurtunities to pump while im away. i will be dealing with the military. they are not to caring about woman let alone a breastfeeding mom. i know people will say its the law but come on its the military, they will try to provide the best they can but all in all together we can only do what we can. so in 3 days could my supply drop if i can only pump every 4ish hours?

Dandy. Honestly. The biggest risk you run is having to constantly change uniforms for the leaking. If you leak.

and how horrible are my first few days back with my dd going to be, nursing all the time, im assuming?

She may hardly realize you've been gone. Babies are funny that way; no time sense. I used to travel for ten days at a time. Was a real kick in the pants to dinf that my son did just wonderfully without me, thank you very much. I needed him more than he needed me! When I came back, it was normal nursing as if I'd only been in the bathroom.


PLZ help!!!

Relax. You will be fine.

tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Mar. 2, 2012 at 8:36 AM

Inform the military it is the federal law and not pumping enough can make you VERY ill, they do not want to deal with an woman with mastitis when they are training.  MUCH better to let you pump.  I would try every 3-4 hours.  I don't think it will kill supply but it could cause issues for you!

weezer_cookie
by on Mar. 2, 2012 at 8:37 AM
I'm an air force Reservist! Feel free to PM me!
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larissalarie
by Platinum Member on Mar. 2, 2012 at 8:46 AM
Just pump first thing every morning to build your stash. That's when you'll get the most.

Quoting louise1212:

 she will be 12 weeks next week, so by the time i go to drill she will be almost 4 months. but i know that with me uping my supply to pump enough while im gone, will probably cause for more pain when i cant pump as much as i would like at drill.


Quoting larissalarie:

How old is your baby? That will matter to a degree, but no nursing relationship can be destroyed in a weekend :-) Absolute worst case scenario is that your supply drops and baby develops a bottle preference. That's unlikely, but if so you just be more stubborn than baby. More likely is that baby is delighted to see you and attached to your boobs for a few days after you get back!

 

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Rhodin
by Bronze Member on Mar. 2, 2012 at 9:24 AM
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Get with whoever's in charge of you and tell them you need to pump.  Unfortunately, you probably won't be able to do every four hours.  I was in line to qualify when I was supposed to pump.  By the time I got to shoot,  I I was practically on an incline in the prone.  Thank goodness I didn't leak through my pads.

DD used regular cheapo bottles with vented newborn nipples.  She was actually taking a bottle when I got home.  She took one look at me, spat it out, and gave me her first real grin.  I didn't even get my boots off before she was latched and nursing like I never left.  She was 2  1/2 months.


Some tips:

1. Put your poncho with the breast pump.  The whole batallion knew I was a nursing mom, but they sitll couldn't provide a 100% private space on the FOB.  The poncho gave me a uniform-appropriate way to hide while I pumped and I didn't have to ruin my good nursing cover in the field.  Other things to include with the pump are extra batteries and Medela Pump Wipes, available at Target.  The wipes were handier than carrying around dish soap and praying they had running water.  I also had spare valves and such, although I left those in my duffel bag.

2. Also, try to get into the tent with the higest concentration of moms.  Even if they all FFed and think you're nuts, they will understand about engorgement.  Be prepared to answer questions about BFing.

3. You probably won't get as much out in the field, so don't panic.  My worst was when I pumped after I qualified.  I was in an outhouse with two seats and no dividers and there was live fire going on most of those 15 minutes.  The fact that I got 1.5 oz was probably a miracle.  I also hand-expressed after as many pumpings as I could and woke up in the middle of the night to pump, even though DD was usually asleep then,  especially when she was 7 months and I was in the field.

4. It doesn't matter how much you get, since you'll likely have to pump and dump at least some of it.  The point is to avoid mastitis, not provide full baby meals.  I had no access to refrigeration while in the field and anyway, it would have been MRE milk.  Eeeew.

5. Hydrate.  You should know that, anyway.

6. The disposable nursing pads were more absorbent and less of a pain in the buns than the reusables for me.

7.  Wear your nursing bras.  It'll be one less thing to take off when you're trying to figure out where to set your LBV, weapon, backpack, and pump inside a porta potty.  I only pumped in the porta potty at midnight, and that was just common courtesy.  Quiet, my butt Ameda.

FebPenguins
by on Mar. 2, 2012 at 10:45 AM

Thank you for your service. Sometimes I think "we" (american public) REALLY don't know what "you" (service men/women) put up with. Good Luck!

maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Mar. 2, 2012 at 6:35 PM

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