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Breast milk turns to water when they are 1

Posted by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:22 PM
  • 33 Replies

That's what my MIL just said to me last night, which is totally weird because she breastfed her kids until they were 4. She's starting to believe all the formula hype I think.

Why do people really believe that breast milk turns to water when they are 1? I mean really?


by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:22 PM
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Replies (1-10):
saltyalley1227
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:23 PM
What?!? That's crazy I've never even heard that!!
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Stevensmomma
by Bronze Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:23 PM

??????????????

PEEK05
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:25 PM

Yeah my son is 10 months tomorrow and is not on the chart for weight anymore and so I was talking about how I was going to breastfeed until at least 2 so he can continue getting the benefits, plus the extra calories to his diet will do him some good, and was just laughing about it you know. Then she said that your milk turns to water when they are 1. I didn't even know what to say back to that, wow.

SuperMom2433
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:25 PM
Lol! Wow!
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MumsTheWord571
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:29 PM
7 moms liked this
Lol. I've heard that. As well as my stepmom saying she thought breastfeeding after 1 was like child abuse. (after I nursed my DS to 21.5 months.) Apparently, you should "pump and put it in a cup" and if you don't respond to a pump then that's Gods way of saying you need to stop. Imagine my surprise! I looked at her like she was nuts & asked her when pumps were created. She said she didn't know but maybe the last 40 years or so. I asked when did God create breasts? She kind of rolled her eyes & said when He created woman... I said then what does God have to do with pumps? She had no answer. The I told her Jesus was breastfed WELL past 1-- did Mary abuse him? She said no. I asked then what's the difference? She said it's a different age. I said yes, it is. Now not just God supports breastfeeding, but science too. Then told her about the WHO suggesting to AT LEAST 2. She didn't say much after that. Absurdities.
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K8wizzo
by Kate on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:29 PM
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Didn't you know that babies start mooing on their first birthdays?  That's when they turn into baby cows instead of baby humans and need a different mommy's milk!

^^typed as I'm nursing my almost 2 year old

Kaliary
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 1:53 PM
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Quoting PEEK05:

Yeah my son is 10 months tomorrow and is not on the chart for weight anymore and so I was talking about how I was going to breastfeed until at least 2 so he can continue getting the benefits, plus the extra calories to his diet will do him some good, and was just laughing about it you know. Then she said that your milk turns to water when they are 1. I didn't even know what to say back to that, wow.

Maybe she thinks your milk turned to water early, and that's why he's not gaining weight? *face-desk* 

I really don't understand this kind of thinking... it just... doesn't make sense. :/ Sorry you have to deal with that. 

 Trying to Conceive Ticker

maggiemom2000
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 2:48 PM
3 moms liked this

Ha ha!

Send her this link: http://www.drjen4kids.com/soap%20box/turnstowater.htm

When breastmilk turns to water and a cow makes better milk than you do by Lakeshore Medical Breastfeeding Medicine Clinic

I think that if you nurse for a year that someone should have a party for you.  The best I've been able to do is give out shirts. (http://bfmed.wordpress.com/2010/05/13/celebrating-the-journey/)  I've given out more shirts than I can count now and I have a (now not-so-current) recognition  list of of "one year" dyads on my website.

 

So, with all these moms in my practice reaching that goal, I began to consider doing something to recognize those mothers who continued to breastfeed to 18 months.  Those wonderful moms, who took the shirt and the congrats at a year said "no thank you" when I mentioned what I was thinking about- they didn't want people to know.  They'd nurse, but they didn't want public acknowledgement. They were "closet" nursers and ok with it.  

 

The one year visit is also an opportunity to talk about the benefits of continuing to nurse after a year.  I'm going to try not to call it "extended breastfeeding" since that reveals a cultural bias that exists where I live, but maybe not where you do. Worldwide, nursing two to four years is just normal. And before cultural biases interrupt the discussion, the AAP policy statement on "Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk"  says that there "is no upper limit to the duration of breastfeeding and no evidence of psychologic or developmental harm from breastfeeding into the third year of life or longer."  

 

So what happens at a year? Well, according to popular belief, as your beautiful breastfed child is sleeping the evening before their first birthday, their world gets rocked: the next day, they will discover that breastmilk serves no purpose. We have found a cow that makes better milk than mom.

 

How do you make a non-verbal one year old understand that? They are counting on that same warmth, expression of love and wonderful nutrition that they got the day before. What's magic about that 366th day of their life?

 

Now really, I know that doesn't make sense and the one year old is probably confused, but I know some wonderful women who believe that even if they are continuing to nurse, that the child still needs supplemental cow's milk "to get enough nutrients."  I may live in "America's Dairyland" where we wear cheeseheads in public, but cow's milk is for cows.  And since I'm usually having this conversation at a well visit, with the child right there, I can do a reasonable job of convincing the family that my physical exam suggests that their child is not a cow.

 

The infection fighting properties of breastmilk are still present; lysozyme, lactoferrin and secretory IgA are present in stable amounts. There are smaller levels of protein, calcium and long chain fatty acids when compared to the milk of a 3 month old, but we're aren't talking about a 3 month old, who is only getting breastmilk. Our toddler is getting complementary foods.  Plus we know that moms who nurse longer lower their risk of breast cancer.

 

I get it.  Many people, including most healthcare providers, don't understand why you'd want to nurse for more than a year.  But they aren't the ones trying to calm a screaming 15 month old.  I'm just saying- if I had to pick between the crying kid I need to distract and make happy somehow and the crying child who I can nurse and calm and get to smile in about 5 minutes, I'm picking the latter.

 

Someday, I'll be able to do something for my friends, the closet nursers, and I'll know we're making progress in my little slice of the world. Maybe then we can convince the rest of the world that nursing a toddler is normal.  

 

 

 

Jenny Thomas, MD, IBCLC, FAAP, FABM

Because of multiple requests, "the" shirts and one that now says "Yes, I'm still breastfeeding" are available here. Or create your own. The point is to celebrate the journey!!!

back to www.drjen4kids.com

Melame68
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 2:49 PM
Yeah because the second they turn one suddenly poof! Your bm becomes useless
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tyheamma
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 2:59 PM

I breastfed DD1 for 14 months and stopped because we were trying to get pregnant and I wasn't ovulating. DD2 is medically fragile and physically unable to nurse. I pumped for her for 14 months, giving her supplements as needed for her medical condition but always with the vast majority of her nutrition coming from my milk (which we gave via a feeding tube). Around 14 months, supply was low and three bouts of mastitis had kicked me down, so we finally stopped pumping and switched to medical formula.

I cannot even tell you how many people tried to tell me that my milk wasn't good enough for my fragile baby. Luckily, very few of those people were involved with medical decision making.

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