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question bount milk production

Posted by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 8:29 PM
  • 4 Replies
I have a weried question... OK since I've been preggers.. I've wanted to breastfeed but I never new if I could or not Because when I was younger I did a stupid deed and pierced my own nipples.. and they more than likely. Were done wrong.. but tonight I noticed liquid coming out so I am assuming that the calostorm stuff that u leak before the baby comes.. by I guess my question is that if I'm leaking is that a good sign that I will be able to breastfeed?
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by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 8:29 PM
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Replies (1-4):
Baby_Avas_Momma
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 8:30 PM
I see no reason why you can't :)
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inkaholicj
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 8:38 PM
I've nursed three kids successfully with pierced nipples. I just take the jewelry out to nurse. That being said my nipples got so sore from taking the jewelry in and out with my 4 mo old that I just took them out for good.
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maggiemom2000
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 8:45 PM

No reason why you can't nurse, even if you did a crazy job piercing your own nipples. There is just no way you could have done enough damage. Even if you did damage a couple of milk ducts, you have lots of them and don't need them all.

The only "problem" is some women will leak out the piercing holes. here's some info for you:

http://www.llli.org/nb/nbiss4-09p4.html

Many women who already have nipple piercings are concerned about their ability to breastfeed in the future. Anecdotal evidence on body piercing discussion boards finds that breastfeeding is not generally affected by established nipple piercings. Human nipples have between 8–12 nipple pores (Riordan & Wambach 2009) therefore it is unlikely that a well-healed piercing will block all of the pores. However, there has been some recent research pointing to a few reported cases of abnormal milk production in women with nipple piercings due to possible duct obstruction (Garbin et al. 2009). Often women find that when they do remove their jewelry for a feeding that milk leaks out of the piercing (Wilson-Clay & Hoover 2005); this can be problematic if the flow is too fast for your infant. Be proactive about preventing or reducing any engorgement and be on the lookout for blocked ducts or mastitis, all of which may be exacerbated by nipple piercings (Armstrong et al. 2006).

It is best to remove your jewelry for each feeding, to reduce the risk of your baby aspirating or choking, although some women do nurse with flexible polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) barbells in place (Angel 2009). Removing your jewelry also reduces the risk of latching-on problems, damage to the inside of your baby's mouth or the passing of bacteria from the jewelry to your baby (Armstrong et al. 2006). If you choose to keep your jewelry out permanently until your baby is weaned, be aware that even a fully healed piercing may close and some women have noticed nipple pain in a previously pierced nipple while nursing (Wilson-Clay & Hoover 2005). You can keep the piercing open by inserting an insertion taper on a regular basis. If the channel closes completely wait at least three months post-weaning before re-piercing (Angel 2009). If you face any problems with breastfeeding be sure to contact your local La Leche League Leader or an IBCLC for help. For problems with your piercing you should be seen by a qualified piercer.


Missyify
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 8:47 PM
Mine were pierced at a shop. I took them out for a chest X-ray and ct scan at around 7 months pregnant. I chose to keep them out after that. No problems with breastfeeding due to the piercings.
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