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please help my baby

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:56 AM
  • 24 Replies

She was born completely naturally last Tuesday and we started nursing right away. She was 6lb 3 oz. By the time the nurse came to our home, she was 5lb 11oz (that was Friday morning). We had plenty of wet diapers with a decrease in soiled diapers over the course of the week to the weekend. By the doc appt on Monday she was 5lb 7oz. The dr, who is extremely pro bfg and all nat remedies, said that she lost 12 percent of her body weight and that we have to supplement with formula unless I can pump enough milk to supplement her with. My milk JUST came in like day 4 after having her. I have been pumping, but not overly pumping b/c I am scared of oversupply... and i get anywhere from 1/2 oz to 1 1/2oz on one side. Her latch is shallow a bit, b/c her mouth is small *same issue I had with my son*, but she still gets plenty. She has been satisfied and popping off when she is done. She has been having plenty of wet diapers. Dr said it's okay if she only stools every other day. I had to start supplementing at least one ounce at every feeding on Monday. They are doing another weight check on Friday. I bf'd my son exclusively for 12 1/2 mos and had milk bursting from day 2. This time, I have had the "just enough" supply with a slow let down. I know that the slow let down frustrates her and she fusses ALOT when it's time to nurse. This is why I believe she lost so much weight, as the rest of her health is perfect, save a loose left hip that they said will correct with exercise. What am I doing wrong? She was eating every 2 hours during the day and every 3 during the night. She still nurses well, but we have painful gas issues since starting the supplementing... which means that we have even more problems getting her latched b/c she is hurting. Mylicon is not working for her very much. I was thinking of using gripe water but Im not sure it will be the right decision. I keep trying to call my ped but their phones are off for some reason. So I am scared to death that by Friday she will not have gained enough for them to leave her alone and not put her in the hospital to force feed. I am heartbroken that we had to start the supplementation anyway since I was so happy we could just breastfeed. All we had to do was work on her latch a bit. Now this. I'm crying all the time because I can't do anything to help her. It's making me crazy. I love her to bits and pieces and I don't want her to hurt or be sick!

~ suni ~SAHM/WAHM to a gorgeous 9 year old boy, a beautiful newborn daughter, married to their dashing father 10+ years...
 Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker

rainbow baby after 4 mcs in a row, 5 mcs all together.

by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:56 AM
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Replies (1-10):
comf
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:01 PM
Are all the weights on the same scale?
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gdiamante
by Gina on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:01 PM
3 moms liked this


Quoting Suni:

She was born completely naturally last Tuesday and we started nursing right away. She was 6lb 3 oz. By the time the nurse came to our home, she was 5lb 11oz (that was Friday morning).

99 ounces birth weight.... she's allowed to lose about ten ounces. She's expected to drop to 89.1 ounces.

We had plenty of wet diapers with a decrease in soiled diapers over the course of the week to the weekend. By the doc appt on Monday she was 5lb 7oz.

87 ounces. Yes, that's a bit too much.

The dr, who is extremely pro bfg and all nat remedies, said that she lost 12 percent of her body weight and that we have to supplement with formula unless I can pump enough milk to supplement her with. My milk JUST came in like day 4 after having her.

Good. Get in bed with her. Do nothing but nurse.

I have been pumping, but not overly pumping b/c I am scared of oversupply... and i get anywhere from 1/2 oz to 1 1/2oz on one side.

Your pump output is dandy but I would NOT pump. I'd get in bedwith her and nurse.

Her latch is shallow a bit, b/c her mouth is small *same issue I had with my son*, but she still gets plenty. She has been satisfied and popping off when she is done. She has been having plenty of wet diapers.

All good, then. Get in bed with her and nurse. That's ALL you need to do.

Dr said it's okay if she only stools every other day.

Yep.

I had to start supplementing at least one ounce at every feeding on Monday.

I think you can drop the supplements now, since your milk is in. They will not help her learn to latch properly.

They are doing another weight check on Friday. I bf'd my son exclusively for 12 1/2 mos and had milk bursting from day 2. This time, I have had the "just enough" supply with a slow let down. I know that the slow let down frustrates her and she fusses ALOT when it's time to nurse.

That's also a nipple preference.

This is why I believe she lost so much weight, as the rest of her health is perfect, save a loose left hip that they said will correct with exercise. What am I doing wrong? She was eating every 2 hours during the day and every 3 during the night. She still nurses well, but we have painful gas issues since starting the supplementing... which means that we have even more problems getting her latched b/c she is hurting. Mylicon is not working for her very much. I was thinking of using gripe water but Im not sure it will be the right decision. I keep trying to call my ped but their phones are off for some reason. So I am scared to death that by Friday she will not have gained enough for them to leave her alone and not put her in the hospital to force feed. I am heartbroken that we had to start the supplementation anyway since I was so happy we could just breastfeed. All we had to do was work on her latch a bit. Now this. I'm crying all the time because I can't do anything to help her. It's making me crazy. I love her to bits and pieces and I don't want her to hurt or be sick!

You're not doing anything wrong. Just get in bed with her and nurse. REALLY. By Friday she should weigh five pounds eleven ounces. That's normal gain.

Just get in bed. Nurse. Don't go near scales.

comf
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:04 PM
Plus, she is supposed to lose the first week, gain the second week. Honestly I would not supplement.

Does the latch hurt at all?
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tabi_cat1023
by Group Admin -Tabitha on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:15 PM

I would see an IBCLC and get her checked for a tongue tie. Pooping everyday is needed at this age too!

Suni
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:31 PM

sometimes it does and sometimes it doesnt. she has a tendency to be a nipple latcher from birth so we readjust a lot.

Quoting comf:

Plus, she is supposed to lose the first week, gain the second week. Honestly I would not supplement.

Does the latch hurt at all?


Suni
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:31 PM

hospital, then home visit nurse, then pediatrician scales respectively


Quoting comf:

Are all the weights on the same scale?


fahmom
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:38 PM
I would not supplement personally. I would nurse on demand. Consult with a LC is your worried about latch. I would get a scale. There between $40-75 on amazon. My local mother and baby support center rents them fairly cheap for one month.
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Moogie1005
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:42 PM
1 mom liked this
I agree with G. Take her to your room, get her skin to skin with you, and nurse, nurse, nurse. Get someone else to take care of everything else.
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maggiemom2000
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 2:56 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree with everyone else. Off to bed with that baby!

Many mothers have found skin-to-skin is the absolute best tool we have for increasing milk supply and getting babies to nurse really well. Spending as much time as you possibly can with you undressed from the waist up and baby undressed except for a diaper, just letting her sleep in your arms against your skin until she wakes and wants to nurse, will help so much. It organizes baby's suck and it stimulates your milk supply. Skin-to-skin contact also keeps her warm and secure and helps her use all her energy to grow.


The two of you can cover up with a blanket when you’re resting together. When you’re up and around, you could carry her inside your shirt/jacket (a button up works best) when she is wearing nothing but a diaper. Babies love to be held so I'm sure she would be thrilled! If you have a sling or soft baby carrier you can carry her in that under your shirt/jacket.


Warm baths have been known to help too. There's something not only relaxing about a nice warm bath, but it also help the milk flow. If you bathe with (baby’s name) that is even better. The warm water helps baby relax and nurse better while it helps you relax and your milk to flow better. For safety only do this when someone is available to help you in and out of the tub.

After spending an hour or two in skin-to-skin contact, many babies wake up, and start to show signs of readiness to breastfeed. Baby turns her head from side-to-side (rooting) and makes scooping motions with her hands. When a baby does this, she is starting to look for the breast. She will start to scootch downward, toward one of your breasts. Just let her scoot herself down toward the breast, and find it herself. The mother needs to be patient and not rush the process. Sometimes it takes several sessions of skin-to-skin contact before the baby actually finds the nipple and latches on.


However, even when the baby is not actually nursing, skin-to-skin is helpful. It increases mother's milk supply. It helps to "organize" the baby's behavior so that she learns to feed more easily. Skin-to-skin contact also keeps your baby warm and secure and helps her use all her energy to grow.


maggiemom2000
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 2:56 PM

http://nativemothering.com/2011/04/what-is-a-breast-compression-and-how-is-it-done/

What is breast compression and how is it done?

If a mother has been encouraged to use breast compressions by a breastfeeding support person she may have some questions about how to use the technique.  She may be thinking, “Is it just squeezing the breast?” Some of the common questions about breast compressions relate to when to do the compression, where to place the hands, and how compressions help milk removal. Because breast compression stimulates let-down, the technique is useful when a mother is assisting her baby that is having a difficult time removing milk at the breast, or when she is increasing her milk supply through pumping.

Breast compression is simply using your hand to apply gentle pressure to the breast while nursing or pumping in order to increase milk transfer. The technique can assist a baby (or breast pump) in removing the milk through the positive pressure created in the breast. Both breast compression and gentle breast massage can help keep a baby actively sucking during breastfeeding, and can also increase the fat content of breastmilk. This technique can be helpful when a baby is not gaining weight well or is breastfeeding for extremely long periods because of an unorganized sucking pattern. In some cases, breast compression can assist babies that are nursing in clusters of frequent back-to-back periods of feeding by helping them take in more milk for their efforts (cluster feeding is common and normal during periods of rapid infant growth). Breast compressions can also make breastfeeding more productive for jaundiced babies (symptomatically sleepy, groggy or hard to wake babies) by pushing the milk to the forward part of the breast for easier removal. Similarly breast compressions can help babies that need additional support because of low muscle tone.  If breastfeeding is going well, there is no need to use breast compression!

Before you begin breastfeeding, cup your breast with your hand, placing your thumb on the upper side (top) of your breast and your fingers below. Keep your hand close to your chest wall (imagine making a “C” shape with your hand). Assure your baby is latched on well. Watch for active sucking and drinking, and when your baby is “nibbling”, gently squeeze the breast ( place your fingers away from the baby’s latch so they don’t pop the baby off!) . Gently squeeze and hold until your baby stops to take a breath. Stop the compression cycle when your baby rests, so that your compressions are in tune with your baby’s pattern of eating.

Dr. Jack Newman shares a video of a woman nursing and compressing for better milk transfer here:

 
You can also use massage and breast compression to improve your milk flow while pumping. Release your gentle squeeze when the visible streams of milk in the tunnel of your pump flange dwindle. The Standford School of Medicine offers a fantastic video about combining breast compression and hand expression with pumping in order to maximize milk production here:
How To Use Your Hands When You Pump

Breast Massage How-To

With your hand on your upper chest near your collarbone, begin to massage toward the nipple with your palm using firm but gentle circular strokes. Work from the top of the breast down towards the nipple.  Move your palm over and start at the top again. When you reach the armpit, place your opposite hand over the hand doing the
massage and continue toward the nipple with gentle but firm pressure. Breast massage stimulates the let-down reflex, and helps with increasing a mother’s ability to remove milk.

More Information:

Dr. Jack Newman Breast Compression

Maximizing Milk Removal: Breast Massage and Compression

Massage for the Breastfeeding Mother

References:

Morton, J et al (2009) Combining hand techniques with electric pumping increases milk production in mothers of preterm infants Journal of Perinatology 29, 757-764

Mohrbacher, N (2010) Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple: A Guide for Helping Mothers Amarillo, Texas. Hale Publishing, L.P.

Riordan, J. , Wambach, K. (2009) Breastfeeding and Human Lactation Sudbury, MA. Jones and Bartlett Publishers

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