• In the Spotlight:
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

PPD (Could be Sensitive Topic for Some)

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:31 PM
  • 23 Replies

Let me first say that I have personally been dealing with mild PPD for most of the past 4 years.  I do not dispute that PPD is real.  I also do not dispute that anti depressant drugs are a godsend for many women with PPD.

Here's my question though:

Is it possible that a **portion** of what we call PPD is not psychological, is not chemical imbalance, but is the result of modern society expecting us to return to some mythical pre pregnancy "normal" in a period of time that is physically and psychologically impossible for most women?  Does society expect too much of post partum women / do we expect too much of ourselves?

Do any of the resident experts know of studies that compare PPD rates in countries with 6 to 12 months of maternity leave to the US's PPD rates?

"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:31 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
melindabelcher
by mel on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:53 PM
1 mom liked this
I definetly think to much is expected. Just because one mom can cook clean and take care of four children under five doesnt mean that everyone can. Theres not as much support from family/friends as there is in other countries.
people definetly have true cases that need meds and sometimes they just need time and a helping hand
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
ashleigheg
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:06 PM
1 mom liked this
Mine is one that is a chemical/hormonal imbalance. I have suffered from clinical depression for 13 years now, and after the birth of my daughter 14 months ago, I spiraled into near psychosis. I actually thought about injuring myself and my daughter a few times, and it took my husband telling me he was scared for me before I got help.

I do think some amount of PPD may be perceived because of such a huge push for mothers to do everything as soon as they pop the baby out, but there are definitely true cases of hormonal/chemical imbalance, and regardless, women should seek help before it gets to the point mine did.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
eema.gray
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:07 PM

I think part of the "problem" is that a century ago, most people lived pretty close to aunts and parents.  It was easier for women to just care for themselves and their babies because they had female relatives who understood how necessary it was for a new mom to rest, who would come and pick up the slack, take older children to visit cousins for a few weeks, and all of that.  Most new moms don't have luxuries like that any more and I'm sure not having support from family makes a big difference.

Quoting melindabelcher:

I definetly think to much is expected. Just because one mom can cook clean and take care of four children under five doesnt mean that everyone can. Theres not as much support from family/friends as there is in other countries.
people definetly have true cases that need meds and sometimes they just need time and a helping hand


"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
tabi_cat1023
by Group Admin -Tabitha on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:07 PM

YES I think my PPD was a chemical/hormonal in balance I honestly do.  I felt better once i was not nursing and recovered from the birth..it took a good 10 months.

The child I had PPD with I went back to work/school at 2 weeks PP, I was combo feeding from 3-5 weeks then EFFing.  I was full time working and full time school with 2 kids, it was HARD and my PPD caused major issues for my grades, my work and my relationship with my kids.

eema.gray
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:09 PM

I agree and I would never suggest that women should tough out their depression or deny themselves medical treatment.  If we need medication or therapy, that's what we need and there should be no questions or stigma attached to seeking out appropriate treatment.

It's just something I've wondered about here and there over the years, especially when I'm envious of my half chinese SIL whose mom has moved in for 8 to 12 weeks after the birth of each of SIL's babies.  My brother has NO idea how lucky he and his wife are!

Quoting ashleigheg:

Mine is one that is a chemical/hormonal imbalance. I have suffered from clinical depression for 13 years now, and after the birth of my daughter 14 months ago, I spiraled into near psychosis. I actually thought about injuring myself and my daughter a few times, and it took my husband telling me he was scared for me before I got help.

I do think some amount of PPD may be perceived because of such a huge push for mothers to do everything as soon as they pop the baby out, but there are definitely true cases of hormonal/chemical imbalance, and regardless, women should seek help before it gets to the point mine did.


"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
eema.gray
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:11 PM

That sounds exhausting.  When did you sleep?????

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

YES I think my PPD was a chemical/hormonal in balance I honestly do.  I felt better once i was not nursing and recovered from the birth..it took a good 10 months.

The child I had PPD with I went back to work/school at 2 weeks PP, I was combo feeding from 3-5 weeks then EFFing.  I was full time working and full time school with 2 kids, it was HARD and my PPD caused major issues for my grades, my work and my relationship with my kids.


"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
ashleigheg
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:12 PM
I would have gone CRAZY if my mother had moved in, lol. But that may just be me. My mother is WAY overbearing!

Quoting eema.gray:

I agree and I would never suggest that women should tough out their depression or deny themselves medical treatment.  If we need medication or therapy, that's what we need and there should be no questions or stigma attached to seeking out appropriate treatment.

It's just something I've wondered about here and there over the years, especially when I'm envious of my half chinese SIL whose mom has moved in for 8 to 12 weeks after the birth of each of SIL's babies.  My brother has NO idea how lucky he and his wife are!


Quoting ashleigheg:

Mine is one that is a chemical/hormonal imbalance. I have suffered from clinical depression for 13 years now, and after the birth of my daughter 14 months ago, I spiraled into near psychosis. I actually thought about injuring myself and my daughter a few times, and it took my husband telling me he was scared for me before I got help.



I do think some amount of PPD may be perceived because of such a huge push for mothers to do everything as soon as they pop the baby out, but there are definitely true cases of hormonal/chemical imbalance, and regardless, women should seek help before it gets to the point mine did.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
momof3inTN
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:14 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting eema.gray:

Let me first say that I have personally been dealing with mild PPD for most of the past 4 years.  I do not dispute that PPD is real.  I also do not dispute that anti depressant drugs are a godsend for many women with PPD.

Here's my question though:

Is it possible that a **portion** of what we call PPD is not psychological, is not chemical imbalance, but is the result of modern society expecting us to return to some mythical pre pregnancy "normal" in a period of time that is physically and psychologically impossible for most women?  Does society expect too much of post partum women / do we expect too much of ourselves?

Thank you! I have been thinking/saying this for years (PPD after every baby). Most working women only get 6 weeks of maternity leave, that is far from enough time to get back to "normal." And even moms who stay at home are pretty much expected to get right back to doing everything they were doing before plus taking care of a newborn.

The same day little Gideon was born, I was back in the kitchen cooking dinner for the rest of the family. A part of me really just wanted to rest and lay back and enjoy my new baby and I'm sure if I had just said something my husband would have gone out and brought take out (if he could find any we can eat LOL). But there's a part of me that feels I have to maintain this standard of "doing it all." Society? Family? Whatever, whoever, I have this nagging in me that I must try to be supermom and do everything from the cooking to the cleaning, despite having a new baby in the house.


Do any of the resident experts know of studies that compare PPD rates in countries with 6 to 12 months of maternity leave to the US's PPD rates?

I'm by no means an expert so I hope one does come by but I seem to remember hearing something that said that women in countries with longer maternity leave have a much lower instance of PPD. It wasn't that long ago I heard about it... maybe 6 months?


eema.gray
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:14 PM

From what I understand, it's a tradition in the Chinese culture that your mom or MIL helps for an extended period of time following birth.  SIL's mother felt she was cutting things short by staying for just 8 to 12 weeks.  HER mom stayed with her for six months!

Quoting ashleigheg:

I would have gone CRAZY if my mother had moved in, lol. But that may just be me. My mother is WAY overbearing!

Quoting eema.gray:

I agree and I would never suggest that women should tough out their depression or deny themselves medical treatment.  If we need medication or therapy, that's what we need and there should be no questions or stigma attached to seeking out appropriate treatment.

It's just something I've wondered about here and there over the years, especially when I'm envious of my half chinese SIL whose mom has moved in for 8 to 12 weeks after the birth of each of SIL's babies.  My brother has NO idea how lucky he and his wife are!


Quoting ashleigheg:

Mine is one that is a chemical/hormonal imbalance. I have suffered from clinical depression for 13 years now, and after the birth of my daughter 14 months ago, I spiraled into near psychosis. I actually thought about injuring myself and my daughter a few times, and it took my husband telling me he was scared for me before I got help.



I do think some amount of PPD may be perceived because of such a huge push for mothers to do everything as soon as they pop the baby out, but there are definitely true cases of hormonal/chemical imbalance, and regardless, women should seek help before it gets to the point mine did.



"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
wintermermaid
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 1:17 PM

I think this could be the case for SOME women but then I don't think it would necessarily be PPD in those cases. It could be a combo of all of it for some women. I don't think PPD is just psychological-- I think it's a hormonal imbalance that leads to other symptoms. There is such a large spectrum-- mild to severe to psychosis. 

I experienced PPD throughout that first year or so of my son's life... I didn't have any pressure from myself or anyone else to be doing anything more than just focusing on my baby. I know that I'm lucky because not everyone has that same experience... some women have ALOT of pressure whether it's from family, friends, society, themselves or work. 

I treated my PPD with a protocol from naprotechnology which is the medical component of the Creighton Model which is a natural family planning method. The treatment is taking a bio-identical natural progesterone (prescribed) .. some women take it in pill form, vaginally, or in a shot. It was a miracle and within 3 days I felt so much better. I treated 3 times in that first year. i probably should have started treating for it a lot sooner than I did but I just didn't even realize what was happening. 


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)