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Question about pumping while EBF

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 5:19 PM
  • 6 Replies

 What worked best for you? I was told to let her nurse a bit on both sides then when she is done eating pump and drain the remaing bm. I tried this today (this was my first time pumping ever) and i only pumped 1/2 and oz :( lol so is this the way to go? Or is there another method I could try? Such as bf her on one side and pump on other and switch for each feeding? I wish I didnt have to pump :( But I gotta go back to work in a month and Id like a decent stock in my fridge. oh idk if this would be needed info but DD is almost 4 weeks old

CafeMom Tickers
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 5:19 PM
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maggiemom2000
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 5:24 PM

Learn how to express your milk: Preparing for your return to work or school can begin by learning to express your milk. You can express milk by hand, with a breast pump, or by using a combination of the two. Learning how to remove milk without your baby requires both developing your own expression technique and conditioning your milk ejection reflex (MER) or “let down” to respond to it. Most mothers experience MER in response to the sensation of baby sucking as well as other stimuli like the sound of a baby crying. If you are having trouble eliciting MER during expression, try visualizing your baby at the breast or listening to a recording of your baby's cry. Looking at pictures of your baby or smelling your baby's clothes or a blanket may also be helpful. If you have a video feature on your phone, try recording your baby breastfeeding so you can play it back while expressing. One study indicated that mothers who replicated their babies’ sucking patterns by adjusting the cycle settings on their pumps expressed more milk (Meier, et al, 2012).  Warming the breast before expressing and gentle breast massage (working from the armpit towards the nipple with a soft kneading touch or in a circular motion with flat fingers) has been effective at increasing the amounts of milk removed during expression, too (Jones, Dimmock & Spencer, 2001). Combining hand expression and massage with a pumping routine has been shown to assist with increasing milk production and output (Morton, Hall & Wong, 2009).

How do I hand express?


Hand expression requires no equipment and can be an effective way for you to remove milk when separated from her baby. Some mothers find their breasts are more responsive to the skin-to-skin feeling of hand expression than to plastic pump parts. Once a mother has had some success with a method of hand expression, she may feel that she is able to meet her baby’s demands without a pump.


What type of pump should I use?

A high-quality, full-size, double-electric pump is recommended for a mom who is going to be expressing milk every day. A pump that is made by a company specializing in making breastfeeding equipment  will be of higher quality than less expensive pumps made by a company specializing in making bottle-feeding equipment. A breast pump is an item for which the old adage, “You get what you pay for,” rings true. Another option for many mothers is renting a multiple-user pump, from a trusted source such as a Hospital, WIC, or local IBCLC.

When should I start expressing milk?


Begin preparing for separation by taking some time to enjoy and get to know your baby! Many sources recommend that it is ideal to begin expressing milk after breastfeeding is well established. Spending the first 4-6 weeks breastfeeding exclusively is the best way to establish milk production. Wait until after that time to begin to focus on expressing milk in preparation for your return to work. If your maternity leave is for a duration of less than six weeks, it may be effective to begin expressing milk two weeks prior to the end of your leave.

How often should I express milk?

Once a day is usually plenty to start. Most moms find they are able to express the most milk in the morning hours. You can nurse your baby on one side and express milk on the other side or express both sides about one hour after baby’s first morning feeding. Don’t worry if you don’t get very much milk at first. It takes practice, and your body needs to “learn” to make milk for that extra “feeding.” Any milk collected during these practice sessions can be stored in the freezer.

How much milk should I have stored in my freezer?

Many mothers find that it really decreases their stress before going back to work if they know that they don't need to worry too much about creating a large freezer stash of milk. Instead they can use their maternity leave to focus on being with their babies and on getting breastfeeding well-established. If you have enough milk to send with your baby on your first day, then you have enough in the freezer.

It is important to express as much milk while you are at work as baby needs during that time. If your baby needs 10 ounces while you are at work, then you need to pump at least 10 ounces each day. If, for example, you were to only pump 8 ounces and send 2 ounces from the freezer each day you will no longer be expressing the amount of milk your baby requires. Your body will “think” that baby needs 2 fewer ounces each day than he really does. If you start to run out of milk in your freezer, you may face the difficult decision of how to meet your baby’s needs.

Using this system, you express each day what your baby would need the next day, and only use the small freezer stash for emergencies.

How much milk will my baby need while I’m away?

Breastfed babies drink, on average, 24 to 32 ounces of milk per day (Kent et al., 2006). If you spread that amount over 24 hours it equals 1-1.25 ounces per hour. With that information in mind, plan on leaving about 1-1.25 ounces of milk per hour of separation. Most breastfed babies need no more than 2-4 ounces at each feeding (Kent et al., 2006). Breastfed babies need less milk than formula-fed babies do, and unlike with formula, the amount of breastmilk your baby needs does not increase as he grows bigger. When you return to work, your baby will need only a portion of this daily amount of milk from the care provider, because he will still be getting much of it by breastfeeding during the hours of the day and night when you are together.

Offering smaller bottles, of no more than 2-4 ounces, means there is less chance that your baby will not finish his bottle, leaving milk that will be thrown away.

How many times do I need to express milk at work?

How many times you pump at work will depend on a few factors: how long you are away from baby; how well you respond to milk expression; and your work situation. Many working moms aim for expressing milk at least every 3 hours. If you are becoming engorged between expressing times, you may need to express more frequently. Every mother has her own “magic number” and will differ in how frequently she needs to express her milk to both maintain milk production and provide enough expressed milk for her baby.

Because your goal is to express today what your baby needs tomorrow, you know you are expressing enough when you are able to pump at least the amount that your baby needs.

What if I can’t stop to express my milk as frequently as I should?

When it is challenging to find enough time to express your milk here are some time saving options:
  • You most likely do not need to wash out your pump parts every time, and that can reduce the amount of time you spend during break or during your lunch period.
  • Breastmilk can be kept at room temperature for 6-8 hours (ABM, 2004). Keep your pump parts and bottles of milk in a cool place; covering them with a cool towel will help.
  • Some mothers place all of their pump parts in the refrigerator along with their bottles of expressed milk, each time they pump. At the end of the day they take all of the parts home to wash.
  • Consider arranging your schedule so that you can arrive at work 15 minutes before you need to “clock in” and pump before you start work.
  • If you don’t have enough time to completely drain your breasts, it is still valuable to stop and express some milk, even if it is only for 5 minutes.
  • If you are driving for a during your work hours, you can consider purchasing a car adapter for your pump, along with a hands free pumping bra ( or you can make your own) link: http://www.sleepingbaby.net/jan/Baby/pumping_braconvert.html so that you can pump hands-free. For your safety, Breastfeeding USA recommends that you pull over to express milk and that you don’t do so while driving.

How should I store the milk I express at work. Do I put it all in the freezer?

In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible. Freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando 2006) (Buckley & Charles 2006). Whether fresh or frozen, your milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs, and you can count on your milk to support your baby in all areas of growth and development.

Here is a schedule many working mothers recommend for using frozen milk. Your baby gets mostly fresh milk and the best possible nutrition and antibodies to protect from illness:
  • Pump on Monday; give to your babysitter to use on Tuesday.
  • Pump on Tuesday; use on Wednesday and so on until Friday.
  • Pump on Friday, label with the date, and freeze; put in the back of the freezer.
  • Use the oldest milk in the freezer for Monday.
  • Use your freezer stash only when you have an unusual need for extra milk, for example, when your baby is going through a growth spurt or if you spill all of your freshly pumped milk.

This system prevents the frozen milk from getting too old and needing to be thrown out. Another option would be to refrigerate Friday’s milk over the weekend and let your babysitter use it on Monday. This practice would preserve more of the antibodies in Friday’s milk but wouldn't keep your frozen milk from going out of date.
kittiecat88
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 5:30 PM

 Thank you! This is very helpful!! :)

 

Quoting maggiemom2000:

 

Learn how to express your milk: Preparing for your return to work or school can begin by learning to express your milk. You can express milk by hand, with a breast pump, or by using a combination of the two. Learning how to remove milk without your baby requires both developing your own expression technique and conditioning your milk ejection reflex (MER) or “let down” to respond to it. Most mothers experience MER in response to the sensation of baby sucking as well as other stimuli like the sound of a baby crying. If you are having trouble eliciting MER during expression, try visualizing your baby at the breast or listening to a recording of your baby's cry. Looking at pictures of your baby or smelling your baby's clothes or a blanket may also be helpful. If you have a video feature on your phone, try recording your baby breastfeeding so you can play it back while expressing. One study indicated that mothers who replicated their babies’ sucking patterns by adjusting the cycle settings on their pumps expressed more milk (Meier, et al, 2012).  Warming the breast before expressing and gentle breast massage (working from the armpit towards the nipple with a soft kneading touch or in a circular motion with flat fingers) has been effective at increasing the amounts of milk removed during expression, too (Jones, Dimmock & Spencer, 2001). Combining hand expression and massage with a pumping routine has been shown to assist with increasing milk production and output (Morton, Hall & Wong, 2009).

How do I hand express?


Hand expression requires no equipment and can be an effective way for you to remove milk when separated from her baby. Some mothers find their breasts are more responsive to the skin-to-skin feeling of hand expression than to plastic pump parts. Once a mother has had some success with a method of hand expression, she may feel that she is able to meet her baby’s demands without a pump.


What type of pump should I use?

A high-quality, full-size, double-electric pump is recommended for a mom who is going to be expressing milk every day. A pump that is made by a company specializing in making breastfeeding equipment  will be of higher quality than less expensive pumps made by a company specializing in making bottle-feeding equipment. A breast pump is an item for which the old adage, “You get what you pay for,” rings true. Another option for many mothers is renting a multiple-user pump, from a trusted source such as a Hospital, WIC, or local IBCLC.

When should I start expressing milk?


Begin preparing for separation by taking some time to enjoy and get to know your baby! Many sources recommend that it is ideal to begin expressing milk after breastfeeding is well established. Spending the first 4-6 weeks breastfeeding exclusively is the best way to establish milk production. Wait until after that time to begin to focus on expressing milk in preparation for your return to work. If your maternity leave is for a duration of less than six weeks, it may be effective to begin expressing milk two weeks prior to the end of your leave.

How often should I express milk?

Once a day is usually plenty to start. Most moms find they are able to express the most milk in the morning hours. You can nurse your baby on one side and express milk on the other side or express both sides about one hour after baby’s first morning feeding. Don’t worry if you don’t get very much milk at first. It takes practice, and your body needs to “learn” to make milk for that extra “feeding.” Any milk collected during these practice sessions can be stored in the freezer.

How much milk should I have stored in my freezer?

Many mothers find that it really decreases their stress before going back to work if they know that they don't need to worry too much about creating a large freezer stash of milk. Instead they can use their maternity leave to focus on being with their babies and on getting breastfeeding well-established. If you have enough milk to send with your baby on your first day, then you have enough in the freezer.

It is important to express as much milk while you are at work as baby needs during that time. If your baby needs 10 ounces while you are at work, then you need to pump at least 10 ounces each day. If, for example, you were to only pump 8 ounces and send 2 ounces from the freezer each day you will no longer be expressing the amount of milk your baby requires. Your body will “think” that baby needs 2 fewer ounces each day than he really does. If you start to run out of milk in your freezer, you may face the difficult decision of how to meet your baby’s needs.

Using this system, you express each day what your baby would need the next day, and only use the small freezer stash for emergencies.

How much milk will my baby need while I’m away?

Breastfed babies drink, on average, 24 to 32 ounces of milk per day (Kent et al., 2006). If you spread that amount over 24 hours it equals 1-1.25 ounces per hour. With that information in mind, plan on leaving about 1-1.25 ounces of milk per hour of separation. Most breastfed babies need no more than 2-4 ounces at each feeding (Kent et al., 2006). Breastfed babies need less milk than formula-fed babies do, and unlike with formula, the amount of breastmilk your baby needs does not increase as he grows bigger. When you return to work, your baby will need only a portion of this daily amount of milk from the care provider, because he will still be getting much of it by breastfeeding during the hours of the day and night when you are together.

Offering smaller bottles, of no more than 2-4 ounces, means there is less chance that your baby will not finish his bottle, leaving milk that will be thrown away.

How many times do I need to express milk at work?

How many times you pump at work will depend on a few factors: how long you are away from baby; how well you respond to milk expression; and your work situation. Many working moms aim for expressing milk at least every 3 hours. If you are becoming engorged between expressing times, you may need to express more frequently. Every mother has her own “magic number” and will differ in how frequently she needs to express her milk to both maintain milk production and provide enough expressed milk for her baby.

Because your goal is to express today what your baby needs tomorrow, you know you are expressing enough when you are able to pump at least the amount that your baby needs.

What if I can’t stop to express my milk as frequently as I should?

When it is challenging to find enough time to express your milk here are some time saving options:
  • You most likely do not need to wash out your pump parts every time, and that can reduce the amount of time you spend during break or during your lunch period.
  • Breastmilk can be kept at room temperature for 6-8 hours (ABM, 2004). Keep your pump parts and bottles of milk in a cool place; covering them with a cool towel will help.
  • Some mothers place all of their pump parts in the refrigerator along with their bottles of expressed milk, each time they pump. At the end of the day they take all of the parts home to wash.
  • Consider arranging your schedule so that you can arrive at work 15 minutes before you need to “clock in” and pump before you start work.
  • If you don’t have enough time to completely drain your breasts, it is still valuable to stop and express some milk, even if it is only for 5 minutes.
  • If you are driving for a during your work hours, you can consider purchasing a car adapter for your pump, along with a hands free pumping bra ( or you can make your own) link: http://www.sleepingbaby.net/jan/Baby/pumping_braconvert.html so that you can pump hands-free. For your safety, Breastfeeding USA recommends that you pull over to express milk and that you don’t do so while driving.

How should I store the milk I express at work. Do I put it all in the freezer?

In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible. Freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando 2006) (Buckley & Charles 2006). Whether fresh or frozen, your milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs, and you can count on your milk to support your baby in all areas of growth and development.

Here is a schedule many working mothers recommend for using frozen milk. Your baby gets mostly fresh milk and the best possible nutrition and antibodies to protect from illness:
  • Pump on Monday; give to your babysitter to use on Tuesday.
  • Pump on Tuesday; use on Wednesday and so on until Friday.
  • Pump on Friday, label with the date, and freeze; put in the back of the freezer.
  • Use the oldest milk in the freezer for Monday.
  • Use your freezer stash only when you have an unusual need for extra milk, for example, when your baby is going through a growth spurt or if you spill all of your freshly pumped milk.

This system prevents the frozen milk from getting too old and needing to be thrown out. Another option would be to refrigerate Friday’s milk over the weekend and let your babysitter use it on Monday. This practice would preserve more of the antibodies in Friday’s milk but wouldn't keep your frozen milk from going out of date.

 

CafeMom Tickers
GoodyBrook
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 5:38 PM
I personally pumped from one side while DS nursed from the other during the very first session of the morning. It worked great as soon as I learned to juggle him and the pump!
GoodyBrook
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 5:39 PM
Oh, and I only pumped that one time per day because I didn't want my body to start OVER-producing.
kathislove80
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 6:43 PM
1 mom liked this
I too am stocking up to return to work. I pump in the morning after DS eats. I have a hard time pumping off of one side while he is eating from the other side...I lost 1/2 an ounce that way :/. I also pump when he goes down for a few hours at night, he usually sleeps from about 8pm-1030pm, and I get an extra 2.5oz this way each day to freeze.
I have about 40oz saved in the freezer.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
krys1025
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 7:17 PM
This is what I was told to do... Pump one side while they nurse on other..


Quoting GoodyBrook:

I personally pumped from one side while DS nursed from the other during the very first session of the morning. It worked great as soon as I learned to juggle him and the pump!

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
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