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anxity meds

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 7:04 PM
  • 5 Replies

what ones  are off limits is ativan a no go while nursing?


by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 7:04 PM
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mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Apr. 25, 2012 at 7:12 PM
Isn't Ativan a tranquilizer? Going to check LactMed. You're asking about on the spot anxiety meds, not daily maintenance depression/anxiety meds?
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mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Apr. 25, 2012 at 7:14 PM
From LactMed app: (Ativan=lorazepam)

Lorazepam has low levels in breastmilk, a short half-life relative to many other benzodiazepines, and is administered directly to infants. Lorazepam would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants with usual maternal dosages. No special precautions are required.
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candycrz
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 7:24 PM

yes its on the spot anxiety meds i ask cuz when I take one it knocks me on my ass lol

Quoting mostlymaydays:

Isn't Ativan a tranquilizer? Going to check LactMed. You're asking about on the spot anxiety meds, not daily maintenance depression/anxiety meds?



newbabystarr09
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 7:35 PM

Make sure you don't co-sleep if the med knocks on your ass LOL.. but IMHO I would not take anything that would put me out..I'm on Zoloft I was on 50mg and now on 100mg..most people it helps right away with lower dose then mine..mine takes longer and I have to have a higher dose..maybe you could talk to your doctor about putting you on the med.maybe you would be one of the lucky people to take Zoloft and feel great within a few weeks it's for anxiety too..you take it everyday

Quoting candycrz:

yes its on the spot anxiety meds i ask cuz when I take one it knocks me on my ass lol

Quoting mostlymaydays:

Isn't Ativan a tranquilizer? Going to check LactMed. You're asking about on the spot anxiety meds, not daily maintenance depression/anxiety meds?



maggiemom2000
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 8:45 PM

Actually ativan is towards the top of the list:

The following information comes from MEDICATIONS AND MOTHERS’ MILK by Thomas Hale, 2010.  He assigns every drug a lactation risk category:  L1, safest; L2, safer; L3, moderately safe; L4, possible hazardous; and L5, contraindicated. He also lists if a drug has been reviewed and/or approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for use in nursing mothers.  Possible risks to mother and baby are listed as well as possible effect on milk supply.

LORAZEPAM (Ativan)

Listed as L3, moderately safe; pediatric concerns: None reported via milk, but observe for sedation. “It would appear from these studies that the amount of lorazepam secreted into milk would be clinically insignificant under most conditions.”

VALIUM (Diazepam) L3; AAP: Drugs whose effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of concern. Pediatric concerns:  Some reports of lethargy, sedation, poor suckling have been found.  “Published data on milk and plasma levels are highly variable and many are poor studies.  The acute use such as in surgical procedures is not likely to lead to significant accumulation.”  The levels of the drug peak in the blood 1-2 hours after taking, and decline significantly after 43 hours.  “The shorter-acting benzodiazepines (lorazepam, alprazolam) are safest during lactation provided their use is short term or intermittent, low dose.”


CLONAZEPAM (Klonopin)

Listed as L3; not reviewed by AAP; Pediatric concerns: Apnea, cyanosis and hypotonia was reported in one infant at 6 hours postnatally to a woman consuming clonazepam throughout pregnancy…In another group of 11 mothers consuming clonazepam, none of the infants had any reported side effects.  Peak concentrations in milk at approximately 4 hours post dose. Suggested alternatives: Lorazepam

XANAX (alprazolam):  L3: AAP: Drug whose effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of concern.  Pediatric concerns:  Rarely, withdrawal syndrome reported in on breastfed infant.  Observe for sedation, poor feeding, irritability, crying, insomnia on withdrawal.  Use on acute or short term basis is not contraindicated.

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