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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Block feeding twins?

Posted by on May. 1, 2012 at 3:17 PM
  • 3 Replies
I'm just wondering if this is a good idea or not... Or how to correct oversupply with them. I usually assign each twin a side for the day, and switch the following day. Or try to alternate each feeding, depending how close together they eat (I haven't tandem nursed them in a while because they have just gotten too big and awkward for me to figure out a good position) but I still have oversupply, OAL, and leak a bit between feedings. But then I figured block feeding might not work because it may just contribute to more oversupply?? Or should I just leave things be??
CafeMom Tickers
by on May. 1, 2012 at 3:17 PM
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mollysmom328
by Stephanie on May. 1, 2012 at 3:56 PM

hhmm. . I have experience with block feeding but certainly not with twins.  Are they experience any "symptoms"?  Spitting up a lot, fussiness at the breast because flow is too fast?  I would say, if they aren't then I would probably just leave it be.

melindabelcher
by mel on May. 1, 2012 at 4:28 PM
You could always try small blocks (2hr) and work up to longer ones if need be.
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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 1, 2012 at 5:11 PM

To block feed with twins you do exactly what you've described: assign each baby a breast for the "blocks"

Since you are not tandem feeding, you can try offering the same breast 2-4 times, then the other breast 2 times. You just want to make sure you mix up who gets the breast first. It might work to do it 3 times on each breast. So it would look like: Right breast: Jack-Noah-Jack then Left Breast: Noah-Jack-Noah. Repeat. That way they get equal time on fuller and emptier breasts.

The key to reducing supply is to leave the one breast "full" for a period of time. " There is a certain whey protein in the milk, called "Feedback Inhibitor of Lactation" (FIL), that begins to build up and concentrate when milk is not removed for a while. This protein needs to be allowed to build up high enough to trigger the breast to cut back milk production." http://www.llli.org/faq/oversupply.html

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