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When my son turns 8 mths old i start giving him bm in a bottle? And if not how many oz will it be ok to give him at that age? he'll be 5mths soon but i just want to make sure that i get all the,facts right before making that move. And i want too make sure thats ok. All advice will be appreciated.
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by on May. 2, 2012 at 1:20 AM
Replies (21-30):
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on May. 2, 2012 at 12:18 PM


Quoting Glowing4Caleb:

Ok, I have a 4.5 year old and he slept through the night at 6 months just about every single night with the exception of a growing pain here or there. So, to say that you wont ever sleep again is silly. Perhaps that previous poster just has bad sleepers.

And IS a bad sleeper herself! It's ingrained in the person. My mom did the exact same thngs with me and my brother. He slept, I didn't and still dont. (Sleep is boring!) I just read something recently about a gene linked to how much sleep we need. Wish I remember where I saw it.


SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on May. 2, 2012 at 12:26 PM

Well, that was her and this is him.   They are different people and have different needs.   Switching to EPing won't mean he will sleep... even switching to formula won't mean he will sleep.   Some babies just don't sleep long stretches and there's not a whole lot you can do but wait it out.   

My first woke every 2 hours like clockwork for about 14 months... nothing I did made a lick of difference in his sleep, it was just the way he was.   He's now 6 and I tell him it's bedtime, tuck him in, and he sleep until morning.   It doesn't last forever... just do what you need to do to get through these first couple of years.

What we did with the first was to co-sleep part time... put him down in his own bed so that we could have our wind-down and cuddle time, and then I'd bring him to bed with us the first (sometimes 2nd, depending on if we were still up the first time he woke) time he woke.    It gave us our "couple" time, but I wasn't a zombie the next day since I still got the sleep I needed.

Quoting McM0609:

Well im glad that at least some of you understand what i mean, my daughter started sleeping through the night at 2 mths so yea this is actually new to me. I also did CIO with my daughter but with my son i cant cause he wont stop crying for nothing. Even after being checked for a dirty diaper or or being fed.

Quoting Glowing4Caleb:

Ok, I have a 4.5 year old and he slept through the night at 6 months just about every single night with the exception of a growing pain here or there. So, to say that you wont ever sleep again is silly. Perhaps that previous poster just has bad sleepers. I got 4 good years of sleeping every night before my second was born three months ago. Now? Yeah, I get up a good one or two times at night.

I do agree that switching to their own space is a great idea. Honestly, bottles would make you have to wake up just as much and then you have to prepare the bottle. You could have a rocking chair or glider in baby's room or, I just get him from his bed and nurse in mine so I can still lay down or even doze a bit. But, when the baby is finished and/or asleep, I unlatch and put him back in his space.

At 6 months old, assuming he is doing well growth wise, I will begin to sleep train him if he isn't sleeping through the night by then. We did a form of CIO, which isn't for every one. (when baby cries, be sure he is dry, say it is night night time, then leave room. After 5 minutes, go back in pat, say night night, and repeat. Increasing the times of going in by 5 minutes. I only had to do this for two nights before he was sleeping through the night (with my first) so I will do this again with my second and hope for the same results.




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larissalarie
by Platinum Member on May. 2, 2012 at 12:47 PM
Sorry I forgot to answer why ep is harder. Because you have to pump every couple of hours (even overnight, at least while you establish your pumping "relationship") and then you still have to bottle fed the baby! Plus all that putting the pump together, taking it apart, washing the parts 10-12 times a day....
(I'm not trying to discourage you either, if you think it will help it's worth a try. I just want you to go into it with the facts needed to be successful)


Quoting McM0609:

Yes, he has no problem taking a bottle and the nipple. He takes both with no problem. Why and how is it more difficult EP?


Quoting larissalarie:

Ahhh you want to switch to exclusively pumping! That's totally different from what I thought.

Does he take a bottle now? EP is very difficult, especially at that age. You can transition baby to sleeping in a crib without bottle feeding :-)

(the last baby I babysat was still sleeping in his parents bed at THREE when I quit watching him and he was formula fed from day one)


Quoting McM0609:

How in a cup? In a sippy cup or in regular cup? How does that work? I,want to do this cause cosleeping isnt working out, he just gtg too used,too sleeping with us and i would like to cuddle with my husband again but not give up bf or bm. If i could give him bm in a bottle that'll be awesome. I just dont want too feel guilty for using one.



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tyheamma
by on May. 2, 2012 at 12:50 PM
2 moms liked this

I exclusively pumped for DD2 for 14 months because she is medically fragile and can't take foods by mouth. She has a feeding tube and we gave her breastmilk through that.

Exclusive pumping is harder because it takes an incredible commitment in time and energy, and even the best hospital grade pump is no match for a healthy baby with a strong suck reflex. If you are committed to keeping your supply up, you need to pump every 2-3 hours and maybe every 4-5 at night. This does not change with age because the pump will never become a better nurser. If your then 8 month old is done nursing in five minutes, it can still take 15 to 30 minutes for each of those sessions. Plus you have to clean pump parts and bottles and if you aren't great about doing it quickly, the residue from all that healthy fat in breastmilk can be a major pain to clean out of bottles (especially the bottle nipples). If you don't fully drain each breast or you skip a session or two, you run the risk of mastitis. It is also incredibly difficult to increase supply while pumping unless you are incredibly diligent. Add to the fact that breastmilk out of the breast has to be kept cold until used (which does lose some, though certainly not all of the benefits), and you'll have to carry bottles and ice packs wherever you go... it loses a fair bit of appeal.

I would not recommend exclusive pumping to anyone who has a choice. I didn't, and I'm proud to say it is possible if you fight like hell for it, but it is hard and usually not worth the commitment if you are committed to breastfeeding until a certain milestone (a year or two or three, self-weaning, etc.). Many moms I knew who wanted to pump to avoid some of the sacrifices of breastfeeding like always being with the baby, they didn't stick to the 2-3 hour schedule and ran their supply into the ground and a few got mastitis on top of that.

All of that said... this group will support you and help you if you make that choice, but we're all about informed decisions. I'm not going to sit by and let you think it's easier when it isn't, but it is possible.

Quoting McM0609:

Yes, he has no problem taking a bottle and the nipple. He takes both with no problem. Why and how is it more difficult EP?

Quoting larissalarie:

Ahhh you want to switch to exclusively pumping! That's totally different from what I thought.

Does he take a bottle now? EP is very difficult, especially at that age. You can transition baby to sleeping in a crib without bottle feeding :-)

(the last baby I babysat was still sleeping in his parents bed at THREE when I quit watching him and he was formula fed from day one)


Quoting McM0609:

How in a cup? In a sippy cup or in regular cup? How does that work? I,want to do this cause cosleeping isnt working out, he just gtg too used,too sleeping with us and i would like to cuddle with my husband again but not give up bf or bm. If i could give him bm in a bottle that'll be awesome. I just dont want too feel guilty for using one.



So many miracles for such a little girl! Follow Lily's story on her blog at princesslilysmiracle.blogspot.com or on Facebook at facebook.com/princesslilysmiracle.

Glowing4Caleb
by Member on May. 2, 2012 at 12:50 PM

I am nervous that will be my second son, too. He gets pretty darn mad when he is tired. :) Good luck though!

Quoting McM0609:

Well im glad that at least some of you understand what i mean, my daughter started sleeping through the night at 2 mths so yea this is actually new to me. I also did CIO with my daughter but with my son i cant cause he wont stop crying for nothing. Even after being checked for a dirty diaper or or being fed.

Quoting Glowing4Caleb:

Ok, I have a 4.5 year old and he slept through the night at 6 months just about every single night with the exception of a growing pain here or there. So, to say that you wont ever sleep again is silly. Perhaps that previous poster just has bad sleepers. I got 4 good years of sleeping every night before my second was born three months ago. Now? Yeah, I get up a good one or two times at night.

I do agree that switching to their own space is a great idea. Honestly, bottles would make you have to wake up just as much and then you have to prepare the bottle. You could have a rocking chair or glider in baby's room or, I just get him from his bed and nurse in mine so I can still lay down or even doze a bit. But, when the baby is finished and/or asleep, I unlatch and put him back in his space.

At 6 months old, assuming he is doing well growth wise, I will begin to sleep train him if he isn't sleeping through the night by then. We did a form of CIO, which isn't for every one. (when baby cries, be sure he is dry, say it is night night time, then leave room. After 5 minutes, go back in pat, say night night, and repeat. Increasing the times of going in by 5 minutes. I only had to do this for two nights before he was sleeping through the night (with my first) so I will do this again with my second and hope for the same results.




McM0609
by Bronze Member on May. 2, 2012 at 12:54 PM
Thnks ladies, this is why i asked u girls cause u all are soo helpful.
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larissalarie
by Platinum Member on May. 2, 2012 at 1:06 PM
I understands that you want the baby sleeping better, we all want a good night's sleep! My oldest slept through the night technically from birth (the medical definition of 6 hours) and what most people mean (all night 10-12 hours) by 6 weeks. She was ebf. My next was awake 10 times a night or more his entire first year. Nothing I tried helped and it just stressed me out worrying about it. The best thing I ever did was accept it and let go. He was also ebf. My third, also ebf, woke every few hours the first 2 months, then started sleeping 7 hours at night. At 4 months he went back to waking frequently and didn't get back to sleeping really well until 7 months.
So it's the baby, NOT the feeding method! Every kid is different and comparing them will just make you crazy :-)

(btw, my sil ff all 3 if hers from birth and her kids were HORRIBLE sleepers. When her youngest was born, she was still dealing with her oldest getting up several times a night)


Quoting McM0609:

Well im glad that at least some of you understand what i mean, my daughter started sleeping through the night at 2 mths so yea this is actually new to me. I also did CIO with my daughter but with my son i cant cause he wont stop crying for nothing. Even after being checked for a dirty diaper or or being fed.


Quoting Glowing4Caleb:

Ok, I have a 4.5 year old and he slept through the night at 6 months just about every single night with the exception of a growing pain here or there. So, to say that you wont ever sleep again is silly. Perhaps that previous poster just has bad sleepers. I got 4 good years of sleeping every night before my second was born three months ago. Now? Yeah, I get up a good one or two times at night.

I do agree that switching to their own space is a great idea. Honestly, bottles would make you have to wake up just as much and then you have to prepare the bottle. You could have a rocking chair or glider in baby's room or, I just get him from his bed and nurse in mine so I can still lay down or even doze a bit. But, when the baby is finished and/or asleep, I unlatch and put him back in his space.

At 6 months old, assuming he is doing well growth wise, I will begin to sleep train him if he isn't sleeping through the night by then. We did a form of CIO, which isn't for every one. (when baby cries, be sure he is dry, say it is night night time, then leave room. After 5 minutes, go back in pat, say night night, and repeat. Increasing the times of going in by 5 minutes. I only had to do this for two nights before he was sleeping through the night (with my first) so I will do this again with my second and hope for the same results.




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melindabelcher
by mel on May. 2, 2012 at 1:34 PM
EP can be done but as previously mentioned it is very challenging. I EPd with my first for 6 months before I gave up. I have an oversupply and had difficulty maintaining an adequate supply after 4 months. I was pumping every 2-3 hrs around the clock. He slept through the night at 6 weeks but months later I was still getting up and I was so exhausted.
If you think pumping and bottle feeding will really help then I say try. Whats the worse that can happen? It may work better for you. If it doesn't you can go back to nursing.
My first slept 12 hrs at 6 weeks second didn't sleep through until 18 months. Current baby sleeps 5hr stretch from birth. Last two were breastfed first was bottle fed breastmilk.
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milmil06
by on May. 3, 2012 at 4:06 PM
I recommend a sippy cup my son never would take a bottle and make sure the cup is like a hard nipple I bought the soft nipple one and all he did was bite on it like he did with a bottle then I tried one of my older sons cups and he drinks perfect from it it's a short hard nipple
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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 3, 2012 at 5:01 PM

Okay to switch to Eping? Sure. But it is harder and different, and it won't make our baby need you less. Here's some info on some of the differences between feeding at teh breast and bottle feeding pumped milk:

Are There Differences Between Breastfeeding Directly and Bottle-feeding Expressed Milk?

Yes, there are several differences! Breastmilk is the perfect food for babies, and its benefits are widely known. Less well-known are the benefits of breastfeeding.

Close physical contact with your baby helps your body create antibodies to germs in his environment. When you breastfeed directly, your body responds to cues from your baby’s saliva and other secretions. After exposure to new pathogens, your body can make targeted antibodies available to your baby within the next several hours (Chirco 2008) (Cantini 2008). While a bottle of milk from a previous date will provide your baby with beneficial anti-infective factors, it will not contain antibodies to germs he was exposed to today.

Breastfeeding directly supports the normal development of a baby’s jaw, teeth, face, and speech. The activity of breastfeeding helps exercise the facial muscles and promotes the development of a strong jaw and symmetric facial structure. Several studies have shown breastfeeding to enhance speech development and speech clarity. An increased duration of breastfeeding is associated with a decreased risk of the later need for braces or other orthodontic treatment. One study showed that the rate of misaligned teeth (malocclusion) requiring orthodontia could be cut in half if infants were breastfed for one year (Palmer 2008).

Bottle-feeding expressed breastmilk is more time consuming than breastfeeding directly because there are bottle and pump parts to wash, and you have to spend additional time expressing milk. When breastfeeding, and your baby is hungry or needs to be comforted, you simply put him to the breast. When exclusively bottle-feeding breast milk, you must first attend to preparing a bottle before you are able to meet your baby's needs. If you are expressing your milk, you may have concerns about when you will find the time to pump or hand express, the amount of milk you are able to express, and how to maintain your milk production. Expressing milk and cleaning milk-collection equipment takes time that you might otherwise be able to spend simply enjoying your baby.

Skin-to-skin contact (also known as “kangaroo care”) is important to your baby’s development (Bigelow 2010). Babies held skin-to-skin stay warmer, cry less, and have better-coordinated sucking and swallowing patterns. Mothers who hold their babies skin-to-skin enjoy increased milk production, increased oxytocin response, improved mother-baby bonding, and more confidence in their mothering abilities (Moore, Anderson & Bergman 2009). When you are breastfeeding, you will naturally be in a position to offer skin-to-skin contact to your baby. When you are bottle-feeding, it is important to find additional time each day to hold your baby this way.

Research has shown breastfeeding directly correlates with a positive psychological effect on mothers. One study examined the effects of breastfeeding and bottle-feeding on maternal mood and stress. After breastfeeding, the mothers in the study were found to have both a reduction in perceived stress and a more positive mood. In contrast, after bottle-feeding, mothers were found to have an increase in negative feelings. The researchers suggested that the higher levels of oxytocin released by breastfeeding may contribute to reduction in stress and better mood (Mezzacappa & Katkin 2002).

Bottle-feeding gives baby less control over his milk intake. There can be a tendency for the person feeding to encourage the baby to finish the bottle. Milk flows easily from a bottle nipple even when the baby is not actively sucking, and the faster flow can cause a baby to continue feeding after he is full. When bottle-feeding, you may wonder: How much should baby take? While breastfeeding, your baby can control the flow of milk by the way he feeds. You are not able to see how much milk your baby consumed, but you can watch for signs that your baby is satisfied, and you will be less likely to coax your baby to continue eating after he is full. Research suggests that infants who are breastfed, rather than bottle-fed breastmilk, are better able to self-determine fullness as children. This phenomenon may decrease the risk of overeating and obesity later in life (Isslemann, 2011).

There are some variations between milk that is obtained directly from the breast (or that has been freshly expressed) and milk that has been stored. For example, freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando 2006) (Buckley & Charles 2006). In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible.

From the breast or from the bottle, fresh or frozen, your milk provides all of the nutrition your baby needs for normal growth and development. If you are bottle-feeding your baby partly or fully, and you would like to increase his feedings from the breast, or if you need information about exclusively expressing your milk, a Breastfeeding Counselor orInternational Board Certified Lactation Consultant may be able to help. Accessing a community support system can help you reach your breastfeeding goals.

References:

Buckley, K. Charles, G. (2006)  Benefits and challenges of transitioning preterm infants to at-breast feedingsInternational Breastfeeding Journal 1:13

Cantini, A. (2008) Pediatric Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Heidelburg, N.Y. Springer.

Chirico, G. et al (2008) Antiinfective Properties of Human Milk  Journal of Nutrition 138, 1801S–1806

Isselmann Disantis, K. (2011) Do infants fed directly from the breast have improved appetite regulation and slower growth during early childhood compared with infants fed from a bottle? The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity 17;8 (1):89

Moore ER, Anderson GC, Bergman N. (2009) Early skin-to-skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants Cochrane Summaries

Mezzacappa, E. Katkin. E (2002) Breastfeeding is associated with reduced perceived stress and negative mood in mothers Health Psychology 21(2), 187-193

Orlando, S (2006) The immunologic significance of breast milk. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs 24(7), 678-83

Palmer, B. (2008) The Influence of Breastfeeding on the Development of the Oral Cavity:  A Commentary  Journal of Human Lactation, 14(2), 93-98

St. Francis Xavier University: Dr. Anne Bigelow. Enhancing Baby’s First Relationship: A Parents’ Guide for Skin-to-Skin Contact with Their Infants 

© Jolie Black Bear, IBCLC, Serena Meyer, IBCLC, Teglene Ryan, and Adrienne Uphoff, IBCLC

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