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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Vitamin D. Is it needed?

Posted by on May. 4, 2012 at 12:49 PM
  • 10 Replies

DD just had her 4 month visit yesterday and the doctor said to start Vitamin D. She is EBF. I never did the vitamins with my son who is 4 so not really sure it's needed. Doctor said breastmilk does not have any which is why they need it.

by on May. 4, 2012 at 12:49 PM
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Replies (1-10):
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on May. 4, 2012 at 12:53 PM

It's needed if you don't get lots of sun. Up in Vancouver, you're heading to crazy long days of sunshine so you should be fine without.

I'm in SoCal and our ped doesn't recommend them at all. Vit D comes from the sun, not breastmilk. 

livewell
by on May. 4, 2012 at 1:07 PM

NO! You don't need to supplement. It is another way that the "establishment" undermines the womanly art of breastfeeding!

(But I DID buy the drops...never used them, but had them "just in case" LOL) If you want , I'll send them to you...they are still sealed in the box :) Save you the 20 bucks LOL

livewell
by on May. 4, 2012 at 1:11 PM

Oh, I just thought I would add that the only people who should supplement would be someone who moved here (we live in Nova Scotia, Canada) from, say Africa, and had their baby in the middle of the winter, the MOM should make sure she has a supplement and the baby MAY need a supplemental dose of Vitamin D until the summer arrives...during THOSE 2 weeks, she'd not need to worry LOL)

.Angelica.
by on May. 4, 2012 at 1:14 PM

We aren't getting lots of sunshine right now in washington. lol. Probably won't until about july but I'll skip them like I did with my son. I think we only skipped them with him because we couldn't find any.

Quoting gdiamante:

It's needed if you don't get lots of sun. Up in Vancouver, you're heading to crazy long days of sunshine so you should be fine without.

I'm in SoCal and our ped doesn't recommend them at all. Vit D comes from the sun, not breastmilk. 


.Angelica.
by on May. 4, 2012 at 1:22 PM
1 mom liked this

lol thanks. i'll skip them.

Quoting livewell:

NO! You don't need to supplement. It is another way that the "establishment" undermines the womanly art of breastfeeding!

(But I DID buy the drops...never used them, but had them "just in case" LOL) If you want , I'll send them to you...they are still sealed in the box :) Save you the 20 bucks LOL


Gruntlings
by on May. 4, 2012 at 1:33 PM
1 mom liked this

Breastmilk does have vitamin D. Low amounts of it that do not meet the RDA. Some call it "deficient". This is misleading.

Vitamin D is actually a prohormone, not a vitamin. Our skin synthesizes it when it is exposed to sunlight. It was never intended to be absorbed through diet, therefore it is not passed through breastmilk in any substantial quantity. Or any milk, for that matter. Breastmilk is not "deficient" in vitamin D because it is not SUPPOSED to contain large amounts of D.

Our lifestyle is deficient in sunlight, and therefore our bodies are deficient in D. Because we avoid sunlight, live sedentary lives indoors and slather on sunscreen when we go outside, many people are D deficient. This can cause rickets which are weakened bones (vitamin D is needed by the body for the body to use calcium properly) as well as other health issues.

The body stores vitamin D , and when mom is pregnant she passes the vitamin D stores on to baby, so babies are born with enough D to last through the winter without much sunlight. If mom's D deficient, baby will be born D deficient or with lower stores of D and will need vitamin D drops. (NOT multivitamin drops) 

Whether you supplement with D depends on this:

1- Do you live in a climate that gets enough sunlight?

2- Do you regularly expose your baby to sunlight without a hat or sunscreen? Is it safe to do so? (in Florida, for example, it may be too easy for baby to get a sunburn. Or in very northern climates it may be too cold to expose baby to enough sunlight with enough skin being bare. (Sunlight through windows doesn't work.)

3- Were you regularly exposed to sunlight throughout your pregnancy?

4- People with darker skin have a harder time with vitamin D synthesis than people with lighter skin, so this needs to be taken into account as well.

.Angelica.
by on May. 4, 2012 at 1:44 PM

thanks. I live in washington, during the summer months we get plenty of sun but it's hit or miss other times. I am very pale but never wear sunscreen. I haven't been out in the sun much this year but last summer while pregnant i spent lots of time outside with my 4 year old.

Quoting Gruntlings:

Breastmilk does have vitamin D. Low amounts of it that do not meet the RDA. Some call it "deficient". This is misleading.

Vitamin D is actually a prohormone, not a vitamin. Our skin synthesizes it when it is exposed to sunlight. It was never intended to be absorbed through diet, therefore it is not passed through breastmilk in any substantial quantity. Or any milk, for that matter. Breastmilk is not "deficient" in vitamin D because it is not SUPPOSED to contain large amounts of D.

Our lifestyle is deficient in sunlight, and therefore our bodies are deficient in D. Because we avoid sunlight, live sedentary lives indoors and slather on sunscreen when we go outside, many people are D deficient. This can cause rickets which are weakened bones (vitamin D is needed by the body for the body to use calcium properly) as well as other health issues.

The body stores vitamin D , and when mom is pregnant she passes the vitamin D stores on to baby, so babies are born with enough D to last through the winter without much sunlight. If mom's D deficient, baby will be born D deficient or with lower stores of D and will need vitamin D drops. (NOT multivitamin drops) 

Whether you supplement with D depends on this:

1- Do you live in a climate that gets enough sunlight?

2- Do you regularly expose your baby to sunlight without a hat or sunscreen? Is it safe to do so? (in Florida, for example, it may be too easy for baby to get a sunburn. Or in very northern climates it may be too cold to expose baby to enough sunlight with enough skin being bare. (Sunlight through windows doesn't work.)

3- Were you regularly exposed to sunlight throughout your pregnancy?

4- People with darker skin have a harder time with vitamin D synthesis than people with lighter skin, so this needs to be taken into account as well.


livewell
by on May. 4, 2012 at 1:47 PM

Your hands and face exposed for 20 minutes, a few times a week, is enough :)

Quoting .Angelica.:

thanks. I live in washington, during the summer months we get plenty of sun but it's hit or miss other times. I am very pale but never wear sunscreen. I haven't been out in the sun much this year but last summer while pregnant i spent lots of time outside with my 4 year old.

Quoting Gruntlings:

Breastmilk does have vitamin D. Low amounts of it that do not meet the RDA. Some call it "deficient". This is misleading.

Vitamin D is actually a prohormone, not a vitamin. Our skin synthesizes it when it is exposed to sunlight. It was never intended to be absorbed through diet, therefore it is not passed through breastmilk in any substantial quantity. Or any milk, for that matter. Breastmilk is not "deficient" in vitamin D because it is not SUPPOSED to contain large amounts of D.

Our lifestyle is deficient in sunlight, and therefore our bodies are deficient in D. Because we avoid sunlight, live sedentary lives indoors and slather on sunscreen when we go outside, many people are D deficient. This can cause rickets which are weakened bones (vitamin D is needed by the body for the body to use calcium properly) as well as other health issues.

The body stores vitamin D , and when mom is pregnant she passes the vitamin D stores on to baby, so babies are born with enough D to last through the winter without much sunlight. If mom's D deficient, baby will be born D deficient or with lower stores of D and will need vitamin D drops. (NOT multivitamin drops) 

Whether you supplement with D depends on this:

1- Do you live in a climate that gets enough sunlight?

2- Do you regularly expose your baby to sunlight without a hat or sunscreen? Is it safe to do so? (in Florida, for example, it may be too easy for baby to get a sunburn. Or in very northern climates it may be too cold to expose baby to enough sunlight with enough skin being bare. (Sunlight through windows doesn't work.)

3- Were you regularly exposed to sunlight throughout your pregnancy?

4- People with darker skin have a harder time with vitamin D synthesis than people with lighter skin, so this needs to be taken into account as well.



Angeldolphine
by on May. 4, 2012 at 9:24 PM

Yes, it has a little. But..baby is sopposed to go OUTSIDE. Just go outside as much as you can during the week. I see your baby is fair, she will get enough!

.Angelica.
by on May. 4, 2012 at 10:00 PM

we are in washington so until the summer months our sun is limited. but yes, my kids and pastey white. lol

Quoting Angeldolphine:

Yes, it has a little. But..baby is sopposed to go OUTSIDE. Just go outside as much as you can during the week. I see your baby is fair, she will get enough!


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