Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Breastfeeding info from 1988

Posted by on May. 5, 2012 at 5:39 PM
  • 7 Replies
1 mom liked this

I love that it says that there can be dental problems as a result of NOT breastfeeding, instead of saying that breastfeeding "improves" dental health:


Breastfeeding or Orthodontics?: Should Your Dentist Show You How to Nurse Your Baby?
Reprinted from Newlife Magazine October/November 1988

Dentists and speech pathologists have discovered many factors affecting the proper development of the mouth and jaws soon after birth. There is a good chance for dental problems as a result of not breastfeeding your baby. Although not all breastfed babies have a guarantee of straight teeth for the rest of their lives, they certainly have the best chance of all.

::: Prenatal Factors Affecting Teeth :::

Many variables may affect the development of straight teeth both after birth as well as during pregnancy. For example, birth trauma may induce intracranial pressures if there is a breach birth or prolonged labor. Excessive intracranial pressures could affect jaw development.

During intrauterine life the health of the mother will affect the baby's teeth. For example, "tetracycline staining" of teeth will cause a definite gray hue to the enamel forming on the front teeth at the particular time the drug was used during the pregnancy. A high fever in the mother will also stop enamel calcification causing white or brown bands of hypocalcification occasionally on some front teeth.

And, of course, heredity is one factor that plays a pert in unpreventable malocclusions (bad bites, crooked teeth) or mouth and facial malformations. If the child inherits the father's large upper jaw and the mother's small lower jaw, or vice versa a definite problem will result. Some people have protruding lower jaws. If this is a "structural," skeletal deformity, this feature could be inherited. If it is "functional," or adaptive for that individual, the offspring probably won't exhibit this shape and type of lower jaw.

The mother's diet during pregnancy can also affect jaw development. Fifty years ago, Dr. Weston Price pointed out a correlation between human nutrition and the incidence of crooked teeth and bones in children. He visited tribesmen and aborigines in numerous corners of the earth. He photographed natives' teeth and bodies, and then revisited these same peoples and photographed the identical families 10 years later. During his follow-up visit he discovered and photographed in many instances, the occurrence of new conditions in many mouths and some bodies. For the first time he saw malocclusions (crooked teeth) in some children. He saw, during his second visit, many natives with rampant tooth decay, missing teeth, and bleeding gums. He also observed some cleft lips in some young children for the first time. Skin rashes, acne and obesity also were observed.

What had happened? After conducting a thorough investigation, Dr. Price learned that some of these "primitive," unspoiled tribe members visited a nearby "civilized" mainland or metropolis in their area. In these "advanced" cities, refined carbohydrates such as sugar, candy, cakes, cookies, dry cereals, white bread, white rice, spaghetti, soda, and the like were available and consumed.

::: Postnatal Factors Affecting Teeth :::

After birth, the first and most important factor to consider in the development of straight teeth is breastfeeding. Proper breastfeeding must be started as soon after birth as possible, preferably on the delivery table. Actually and ideally, breast massage and manual expression of milk should be practiced several weeks before delivery as an important preparation. Mothers should be aware of proper breastfeeding techniques, which include position of the baby during feeding, frequency of feedings, expression of milk right before nursing when the nipple is engorged, breaking of the suction to prevent a sore nipple, and steering the nipples to maintain proper air space at all times when nursing.

(1) The steering hand, (2) Airspace, (3) Holding Arm. The infant is thrust onto the areola by stimultaneous movement towards the chest with both the steering hand and holding arm. Maximum oral penetration of areola and nipple triggers sucking mechanism.

If you can't physically or psychologically breastfeed, which artificial nursing system is best? Correction: which system is not the worst? Although no nipple is anywhere as stretchable or compressible as a human nipple, both the Nuk nipple and the Playtex Orthodontic nipple are shaped best. They are ideally contoured to conform to the shape of the space between the palate (roof of the mouth) and the tongue in the developing baby's mouth.

It is important to choose a pliable nipple because if a thick, tough artificial nipple is put in the moth, the baby's young, relatively weak lip muscles can't press hard enough to get liquid out of the bottle properly, so the tongue, a stronger muscle than the lip muscles at birth, is pushed forward against the nipple to release the milk. This activity can cause the start of a so-called "tongue thrust" habit or more properly called a "deviate swallowing pattern," which can result not only in crooked or "buck" teeth but in periodontal disease and throat and stomach problems.

For example, "globus hystericus," or lump in the throat, has been associated with a deviate swallow. It appears that most people who choke to death swallow this way. The reason is that the throat muscles and other posterior swallowing muscles are more poorly developed in these individuals. Also, with a deviate swallow comes an increased incidence of periodontal (gum disease, gingivitis, pyorrhea) disease. Since the tongue is pushing on the teeth with each swallow, the pressure on the teeth could loosen them eventually in some susceptible individuals. It will also cause more food to be pushed and forced against and between the teeth.

Parents also often ask about the use and type of pacifiers. A pacifier is better than a thumb, blanket, finger, toy, or other object. Soft stretchy pacifiers are best. Again, none is as pliable as the human nipple. Your baby's lips develop proper tone only when the pacifier is supple and easily compressed.

Lastly, reports indicate that women who breastfeed almost never develop breast cancer. This is certainly another plus for natural living. If you are physically able to breastfeed, make the right decision. The choice is yours.


References

Byers, T., Graham, S., Rzepka, T., et al. Lactation and Breast Cancer: Evidence for a Negative Association in Premenopausal Women. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1985; 121:664-74.

Garliner, D. Myofunctional Therapy. W.A. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, London, Toronto, 1976.

Garliner, D. Myofunctional Therapy in Dental Practice. Bartel Dental Book Co., Inc., Brooklyn, NY, 1971.

Goldberg, S. There Must be a Reason. Bulletin Flatbush Dental Soc., 21 April 1981.

McTiernan, A. Thomas, L.B. Evidence for a Protective Effect of Lactation Risk or Breast Cancer in Young Women. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1986; 124:353-358.

Price, W. Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. Price-Pottinger Nutritional Foundation, Inc., 2901Wilshire Blvd., Suite 345, Santa Monica, California 90403, 1945.


by on May. 5, 2012 at 5:39 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-7):
melindabelcher
by mel on May. 5, 2012 at 6:27 PM
1 mom liked this
Wow very interesting.
Does any one else feel like the paragraph under the picture sounds like it belongs in a hot and steamy romance novel? :)
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
fahmom
by on May. 5, 2012 at 6:34 PM
Interesting. Thanks for sharing.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 5, 2012 at 7:46 PM


Quoting melindabelcher:

Wow very interesting.
Does any one else feel like the paragraph under the picture sounds like it belongs in a hot and steamy romance novel? :)

LOL!

illegallyblonde
by Member on May. 5, 2012 at 8:18 PM
Interesting.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
LKRA
by Platinum Member on May. 5, 2012 at 10:09 PM
1 mom liked this

"steering the nipples to maintain proper air space"

Forevermore, I will think "747 747 747" when nursing my son.

lol

LKRA
by Platinum Member on May. 5, 2012 at 10:11 PM

Oh, yeah. lol Lots of dirty words in that paragraph.

Quoting melindabelcher:

Wow very interesting.
Does any one else feel like the paragraph under the picture sounds like it belongs in a hot and steamy romance novel? :)


mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on May. 5, 2012 at 10:40 PM
I only nursed my firstborn to 15 months and he is my only one to get cavities and also has a narrow bite and terribly overcrowded teeth. My other 3 kids nursed 2-3 years and have more normal palletes.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)