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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

help?

Posted by on May. 8, 2012 at 2:07 PM
  • 11 Replies
Ok. My twins will be a year old on the 29th. They both still breastfeed. One will not take a bottle or sippy so its not an option to ween him. He is skinny. He is 27.5 inches long and 16.5 lbs 3 weeks ago. His brother was shorter by about half an inch or so but weighed over a lb more, 17.8lbs. My skinnier one, Luke, had sucking problems in the beginning and was in nicu for two weeks. He nursed like a champ once he came home. He likes table food, Evan doesnt.

The doctor is concerned about their growth and has me coming back next week for weight and height checks. Luke sees his nuero again in june ( low muscle tone). She wants me to wean them and put them on whole milk. Is there more calories in whole milk? Theres no doubt in my mind that shes not educated on breastfeeding, shes proved it in our debate on this issue. How do i know if theyre getting enough calories? Theyre starting to slow down on nursing during the day but still nurse several times through the night. How much weight should they have gained in a month at 11 months old? I want to make sure im going about things the right way and know what kind of growth is expected and reasonable at this point.
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by on May. 8, 2012 at 2:07 PM
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wendy1433
by on May. 8, 2012 at 3:20 PM

First of all Congrats on brastfeeding that long... I am a mother of twins and i tried and didnt last longer than a month due to being seperated in different hosiptals and too much stress. And the weights that your twins are sounds pretty close to when my twins were that age... I dont see a need in whole milk if you are able to keep breastfeeding them. Unless you see the need for them to need some milk during the day if they arent nursing. I think its totally up to you how long you breastfeed those precious babies. My DD is 7mo and we are still going strong she is not really into eating solids so i will most likely be EBF till shes a yr old and i plan to wean her when she self weans. Its totally up to you but you should be proud. My twins turn 3yrs in july and everyday doesnt go by that i shouldve tried a little harder to bf them. Great job mama keep up the good work.

collinsmommy0
by on May. 8, 2012 at 3:27 PM
Breast milk has more calories and more fat than any other food, including cows milk. I would continue nursing!

How big we're babies at birth? During the first year it's good to see about 1 pound per month or triple birth weight....so if they were, say, 5 pounds at birth, they are where they should be for weight.
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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 8, 2012 at 4:19 PM

Neuro is dead wrong on weaning them to cows milk, on calories alone:


Calorie and fat content of various milks

AUGUST 2, 2011. Posted in: MILK


Type of milkCalorie content*
(kcal per ounce)
Fat content
(grams per ounce)
human milk22 (average)†1.2 (average)†
infant formula201.06
cow milk (whole)191.00
cow milk (2%)150.62
cow milk (1%)120.31
cow milk (fat-free)100.00
goat milk180.90
soy milk180.50
soy milk (reduced fat)120.25
rice milk (unflavored)150.25

* Rounded to the nearest kcal
† See What affects the amount of fat or calories in mom’s milk?
References:

 

The truth is there are doens and dozens of reasons why you should NOT wean, Remember, most major health organizations say MINIMUM 2 years. Will tiny guy like that, there is no way I'd wean! If anything, you want to nurse them MORE.

Here's just a bit of info from kellymom on why to keep nursing after one year: 

nutritionally, immunologically and psychologically.

Breastfeeding children benefit NUTRITIONALLY

  • Although there has been little research done on children who breastfeed beyond the age of two, the available information indicates that breastfeeding continues to be a valuable source of nutrition and disease protection for as long as breastfeeding continues.
  • “Human milk expressed by mothers who have been lactating for >1 year has significantly increased fat and energy contents, compared with milk expressed by women who have been lactating for shorter periods. During prolonged lactation, the fat energy contribution of breast milk to the infant diet might be significant.”
    — Mandel 2005
  • “Breast milk continues to provide substantial amounts of key nutrients well beyond the first year of life, especially protein, fat, and most vitamins.” 
    — Dewey 2001
  • In the second year (12-23 months), 448 mL of breastmilk provides:
    • 29% of energy requirements
    • 43% of protein requirements
    • 36% of calcium requirements
    • 75% of vitamin A requirements
    • 76% of folate requirements
    • 94% of vitamin B12 requirements
    • 60% of vitamin C requirements

    — Dewey 2001

  • Studies done in rural Bangladesh have shown that breastmilk continues to be an important source of vitamin A in the second and third year of life.
    — Persson 1998
  • It’s not uncommon for weaning to be recommended for toddlers who are eating few solids. However, this recommendation is not supported by research. According to Sally Kneidel in “Nursing Beyond One Year” (New Beginnings, Vol. 6 No. 4, July-August 1990, pp. 99-103.):

    Some doctors may feel that nursing will interfere with a child’s appetite for other foods. Yet there has been no documentation that nursing children are more likely than weaned children to refuse supplementary foods. In fact, most researchers in Third World countries, where a malnourished toddler’s appetite may be of critical importance, recommend continued nursing for even the severely malnourished (Briend et al, 1988; Rhode, 1988; Shattock and Stephens, 1975; Whitehead, 1985). Most suggest helping the malnourished older nursing child not by weaning but by supplementing the mother’s diet to improve the nutritional quality of her milk (Ahn and MacLean. 1980; Jelliffe and Jelliffe, 1978) and by offering the child more varied and more palatable foods to improve his or her appetite (Rohde, 1988; Tangermann, 1988; Underwood, 1985).

References

Breastfeeding children are SICK LESS OFTEN

  • The American Academy of Family Physicians notes that children weaned before two years of age are at increased risk of illness (AAFP 2001).
  • Nursing toddlers between the ages of 16 and 30 months have been found to have fewer illnesses and illnesses of shorter duration than their non-nursing peers (Gulick 1986).
  • “Antibodies are abundant in human milk throughout lactation” (Nutrition During Lactation1991; p. 134). In fact, some of the immune factors in breastmilk increase in concentration during the second year and also during the weaning process. (Goldman 1983, Goldman & Goldblum 1983, Institute of Medicine 1991).
  • Per the World Health Organization“a modest increase in breastfeeding rates could prevent up to 10% of all deaths of children under five: Breastfeeding plays an essential and sometimes underestimated role in the treatment and prevention of childhood illness.” [emphasis added]
maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 8, 2012 at 4:20 PM

Here's the info on average weight gain from kellymom.com:

 
 

Baby’s AgeAverage Weight Gain 1Average Weight Gain 2,3
0-4 months5.5 – 8.5 ounces per week5 – 7 ounces per week †
4-6 months3.25 – 4.5 ounces per week4 – 5 ounces per week
6-12 months1.75 – 2.75 ounces per week ‡2 – 4 ounces per week
[click here to see tables in Metric Units]

† It is acceptable for some babies to gain 4-5 ounces per week.

‡ The average breastfed baby doubles birth weight by 3-4 months. By one year, the typical breastfed baby will weigh about 2 1/2 – 3 times birth weight. 1

Sources:

  1. World Health Organization Child Growth Standards, 2006. Available at:http://www.who.int/childgrowth/en/. To figure average weight gain, we used the weight-per-age percentile charts for birth – 5 years. The range is a combination of boys and girls 5% to 95%, rounded to the nearest quarter-ounce. Click here for more details on calculations [PDF file].
  2. Riordan J. Breastfeeding and Human Lactation, 3rd ed. Boston: Jones and Bartlett, 2005, p. 103, 512-513.
  3. Mohrbacher N and Stock J. The Breastfeeding Answer Book, Third Revised ed. Schaumburg, Illinois: La Leche League International, 2003, p. 148-149.

 

Baby’s AgeAvg. Length IncreaseAvg. Head Circumference Increase
0-6 months1 inch per month1/2 inch per month
6-12 months †1/2 inch per month1/4 inch per month
[click here to see tables in Metric Units]

† By one year, the typical breastfed baby will increase birth length by 50% and head circumference by 33%.

Source: Mohrbacher N and Stock J. The Breastfeeding Answer Book, Third Revised ed. Schaumburg, Illinois: La Leche League International, 2003, p. 148-149.

 

 

See also the Infant growth calculators and breastfed baby growth charts @ 

 

A few things to keep in mind when evaluating weight gain

A 5-7% weight loss during the first 3-4 days after birth is normal. A 10% weight loss is sometimes considered normal, but this amount of weight loss is a sign that the breastfeeding needs to be evaluated. It’s a good idea to have a routine weight check at 5 days (baby should be gaining rather than losing weight by day 5), so that any developing problems can be caught and remedied early.

Baby should regain birth weight by 10 days to 2 weeks. If your baby lost a good bit of weight in the early days, or if your baby is sick or premature, it may take longer to regain birth weight. If baby does not regain birth weight by two weeks, this is a sign that the breastfeeding needs to be evaluated.

Always figure weight gain from the lowest point rather than from baby’s birth weight.

Baby needs to be weighed on the same scale with the same amount of clothing (preferably naked) each time to get an accurate picture of weight gain. Different scales can give very different readings (I’ve personally seen a difference of a pound in two different scales); clothing or diapers can vary in weight and throw the numbers off. The scale should be zeroed before weighing, and baby should be centered on the scale tray. It’s never a bad idea to do a second measurement (it should be close to the first) and then use an average of the two measurements. If your baby is very active or distressed, don’t expect to get an accurate measurement. Babies grow in spurts rather than at a steady rate – to keep from needless worrying, it’s generally best to weigh baby no more often than once a week.

 

Additional information and references

@ 

maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 8, 2012 at 4:24 PM
2 moms liked this

One more thing, with Luke's low muscle tone it is probably even more important to keep breastfeeding. Breastfeeding, especially ful term brestfeeding for at least 2 years, is really needed for optimal mouth and jaw development. With low muscle tone he may already be mroe at risk for speech difficulties. Continuing to breastfeed will be the best "occupational therapy" he can get for optimum development of the mouth and jaw for both speech and eating as he grows.

Evan really needs it to fill the gaps until he is eating more table food (along with all of the other reasons to continue).

EthansMomma129
by on May. 8, 2012 at 4:53 PM
Thank you for all of the wonderful information! :)
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jocelynred
by on May. 9, 2012 at 5:41 PM

my best friend's oldest dd was 17lbs at 1yr. pretty small. but not a concern. it's the overall picture you need to look at. my point is that every baby grows at different rates. 

EthansMomma129
by on May. 9, 2012 at 8:46 PM
1 mom liked this
I took them in today to check for ear infections and weighed them myself....each gained a pound in 3 weeks. Definitly going to keep doing as I am. :)
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aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 9, 2012 at 8:55 PM

WOW! That is A LOT at this age!  : )

You are doing GREAT and there is no need to wean to cow's milk as maggiemom2000 already shared.

Quoting EthansMomma129:

I took them in today to check for ear infections and weighed them myself....each gained a pound in 3 weeks. Definitly going to keep doing as I am. :)


EthansMomma129
by on May. 9, 2012 at 9:16 PM
I thought so too :) theyre eating longer but not as often so i think maybe they were not getting enough hindmilk? I can actually feel myself letting down again before they even start eating so a growth spurt maybe and they increased my milk.

Quoting aehanrahan:

WOW! That is A LOT at this age!  : )

You are doing GREAT and there is no need to wean to cow's milk as maggiemom2000 already shared.

Quoting EthansMomma129:

I took them in today to check for ear infections and weighed them myself....each gained a pound in 3 weeks. Definitly going to keep doing as I am. :)


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