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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

New here and have some questions.

Posted by on May. 11, 2012 at 2:09 PM
  • 14 Replies

I am pregnant with my third child but have never breast fed. I have always needed to be on medication that wouldn't allow me to.  I still do actually.  I am just trying to figure out a new medicine that will let me BF this time.  This is my last baby and I want to BF.  Here are some questions.....don't judge if they sounds stupid...please....

I have a side sleeper that was very easy to give baby a bottle while I stayed in bed never having to move.  I sound lazy but with 2 other kids I have to take sleep into consideration a little bit.  How much work is it at night to feed baby?

How do you know baby is getting enough milk?

Will the baby use me as a pacifier?  LOL

Could I do FF partial time?

Ok, wow...my son is crying to get up from his nap and I can't think anymore. I know I have more.  My second..my son was in the NICU for 6 days and for those 6 days I was able to give him what little bit of milk I could pump out.  As soon as he started getting my milk is when he started to turn around and feel better.  I know that was the reason.  I really want to do this ladies!!

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by on May. 11, 2012 at 2:09 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mama02040608
by on May. 11, 2012 at 2:34 PM
If you laid in bed with a bottle, you can lay in bed and pop him on the breast :) It's what I did.

You know how much they're getting by counting diapers; one for each day of life to a week (so 1 on day one, 2 on day two, etc) and then 6-8 daily thereafter.

Babies like to comfort nurse, pacis are mom replacements :) You certainly can introduce a paci to get a break once in a while; dump it if it affects latch. Feeding baby first should be a default, though, and a paci shouldn't be used as a means to put off baby from eating.

You can do both; not recommended until your supply is fully established. At that point, you may not even feel the need to.

BF can be very intense at first, but it is an experience I would never have traded.

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bowhunter2012
by on May. 11, 2012 at 2:34 PM
1 mom liked this
I don't have all the answers your looking for so I will give ya a bump. Good luck. I have faith in ya :)
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hopeym23
by on May. 11, 2012 at 2:56 PM

Thank you so much!

Quoting mama02040608:

If you laid in bed with a bottle, you can lay in bed and pop him on the breast :) It's what I did.

You know how much they're getting by counting diapers; one for each day of life to a week (so 1 on day one, 2 on day two, etc) and then 6-8 daily thereafter.

Babies like to comfort nurse, pacis are mom replacements :) You certainly can introduce a paci to get a break once in a while; dump it if it affects latch. Feeding baby first should be a default, though, and a paci shouldn't be used as a means to put off baby from eating.

You can do both; not recommended until your supply is fully established. At that point, you may not even feel the need to.

BF can be very intense at first, but it is an experience I would never have traded.


Lilypie Maternity tickers

Baby Slings at Nurtured Family

justone_jen
by Jen on May. 11, 2012 at 3:09 PM
It doesn't require a lot of work at night. The most work I do at night is either laying on my side so she can latch when she wants, or laying her on top of me to do the same. The best part is you don't have to get up to warm a bottle.

You count diapers. The previous poster explained it perfectly.

The baby will comfort nurse. You are not a pacifier. You are a source of comfort, and a pacifier would replace you.

I don't know much about supplementing part time. Can I ask why you want to formula feed partially?

Don't be afraid to ask questions. Educating yourself ahead of time is a way to ensure success. :)
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SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on May. 11, 2012 at 3:35 PM

 I think your questions have been answered... but I just wanted to mention that if you haven't already, you want to be sure and check your medication with a reliable source.   Your doctor, pharmacist and the drug manufactorer aren't reliable sources.    Check with with Lact Med database, and with Dr Hale's "medications and mothers milk" book.   Both will give good info.    If you are comfortable posting your drug here, someone can look up at least some info for you... and if your drug isn't safe, you can have your doctor post to Dr Hales webforum asking for the best  substitute for breastfeeding. 

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ANSnyder
by on May. 11, 2012 at 3:56 PM
It looks like your questions have been answered. All I want to add is breast feeding is an amazing feeling. Knowing that you are providing exactly what your baby needs to thrive. The first few weeks are the hardest but after that you and baby will be a pro! Good Luck Momma!!
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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 11, 2012 at 4:41 PM

I think it is WAY easier to breastfeed without getting up than bottle feed!

You can tell baby is getting enough by how many poops and pees they have, and by watching them gain weight.

You CAN combination feed breast and formula, but you wil lhave the most success if you can first breastfeed exclusively for the first 4-6 weeks. Then, if after that you want to combination feed you have established your supply and you have the option to do one or the other or both.

There are very few medications that are not compatible with breastfeeding. I'm happy to look up your med, andor help you find one that is more compatible. There are lots of breastfeeding moms on this board taking meds for just about anything you can imagine.

You can also call the Infant Risk center to talk to them about meds and breastfeeding: http://www.infantrisk.com/

We are now open to answer calls Monday-Friday 8am-5pm central time. Please contact us at (806)-352-2519.

The decision about continuing breastfeeding when the mother takes a drug is far more involved than whether the baby will get any in the milk. It also involves taking into consideration the risks of not breastfeeding, for the mother and the baby. And there are plenty of risks in not breastfeeding, so the question essentially boils down to:  Does the addition of a small amount of medication to the mother’s milk make breastfeeding more hazardous than exclusive formula feeding? The answer is almost never. Breastfeeding with a little drug in the milk is almost always safer.


sreichelt26
by on May. 11, 2012 at 5:19 PM

Exactly this. 

And most meds are actually safe to take while nursing. If you have a smartphone, download the LactMed app (free) and look up the med that way. Or, if you're comfortable, you can post the name of the med here and we can look it up for you :)

Quoting mama02040608:

If you laid in bed with a bottle, you can lay in bed and pop him on the breast :) It's what I did.

You know how much they're getting by counting diapers; one for each day of life to a week (so 1 on day one, 2 on day two, etc) and then 6-8 daily thereafter.

Babies like to comfort nurse, pacis are mom replacements :) You certainly can introduce a paci to get a break once in a while; dump it if it affects latch. Feeding baby first should be a default, though, and a paci shouldn't be used as a means to put off baby from eating.

You can do both; not recommended until your supply is fully established. At that point, you may not even feel the need to.

BF can be very intense at first, but it is an experience I would never have traded.


aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 11, 2012 at 6:15 PM

This is all of the information that I was going to give. 

Quoting maggiemom2000:

I think it is WAY easier to breastfeed without getting up than bottle feed!

You can tell baby is getting enough by how many poops and pees they have, and by watching them gain weight.

You CAN combination feed breast and formula, but you wil lhave the most success if you can first breastfeed exclusively for the first 4-6 weeks. Then, if after that you want to combination feed you have established your supply and you have the option to do one or the other or both.

There are very few medications that are not compatible with breastfeeding. I'm happy to look up your med, andor help you find one that is more compatible. There are lots of breastfeeding moms on this board taking meds for just about anything you can imagine.

You can also call the Infant Risk center to talk to them about meds and breastfeeding: http://www.infantrisk.com/

We are now open to answer calls Monday-Friday 8am-5pm central time. Please contact us at (806)-352-2519.

The decision about continuing breastfeeding when the mother takes a drug is far more involved than whether the baby will get any in the milk. It also involves taking into consideration the risks of not breastfeeding, for the mother and the baby. And there are plenty of risks in not breastfeeding, so the question essentially boils down to:  Does the addition of a small amount of medication to the mother’s milk make breastfeeding more hazardous than exclusive formula feeding? The answer is almost never. Breastfeeding with a little drug in the milk is almost always safer.



hopeym23
by on May. 11, 2012 at 8:20 PM

My two current meds are Prozac and Lamictal.   Also, what about Abilify?

Quoting sreichelt26:

Exactly this. 

And most meds are actually safe to take while nursing. If you have a smartphone, download the LactMed app (free) and look up the med that way. Or, if you're comfortable, you can post the name of the med here and we can look it up for you :)

Quoting mama02040608:

If you laid in bed with a bottle, you can lay in bed and pop him on the breast :) It's what I did.

You know how much they're getting by counting diapers; one for each day of life to a week (so 1 on day one, 2 on day two, etc) and then 6-8 daily thereafter.

Babies like to comfort nurse, pacis are mom replacements :) You certainly can introduce a paci to get a break once in a while; dump it if it affects latch. Feeding baby first should be a default, though, and a paci shouldn't be used as a means to put off baby from eating.

You can do both; not recommended until your supply is fully established. At that point, you may not even feel the need to.

BF can be very intense at first, but it is an experience I would never have traded.



Lilypie Maternity tickers

Baby Slings at Nurtured Family

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