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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Pumping after babes are born?

Posted by on May. 12, 2012 at 3:02 AM
  • 12 Replies
I'm pregnant with twins and I've been talking to an LC that leads my local LLL meetings and an IBCLC to help prepare myself (had a rough start with my singleton and hoping to avoid that rocky road this time around). Anyhow, the two wonderful women that i have been talking to are encouraging me to BF as much as possible and to start pumping to get my milk in faster...starting in the hospital. However, a friend of mine was told to not use a pump at all until her son was 2-3 weeks old. I'm a bit confused by this. I'm assuming she misunderstood what she was told and her LC just meant to stay away from bottle feeding that early? Is thers any harm in pumping to get your milk to come in faster so long as you are not bottle feeding what you express?
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by on May. 12, 2012 at 3:02 AM
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Replies (1-10):
SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on May. 12, 2012 at 3:05 AM

Generally, just nursing is enough (and just nursing TWO should be more than enough) and pumping can just add an extra layer of exhaustion to an already exhausting situation.    Also, you can cause yourself to make too much milk, which can be hard to deal with.

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aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 12, 2012 at 3:06 AM

The only issue with pumping that early is that it will give your body the extra demand and you could end up with even more of an oversupply to tame.

sreichelt26
by on May. 12, 2012 at 3:28 AM
This. And from what I recall, pumping has no effect on when your milk comes in. It's related to hormones triggered by delivering the placenta.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong.


Quoting aehanrahan:

The only issue with pumping that early is that it will give your body the extra demand and you could end up with even more of an oversupply to tame.

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carolyntx
by Bronze Member on May. 12, 2012 at 3:31 AM
I think if you end up with full term twins of "normal" size then don't worry with pumping. If they are preterm, small etc. It won't hurt to pump after feeds. Most of the twin nursing moms I was in contact with via LLL during my pregnancy did pump after feeds to help bring in that adequate twin supply
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JordanV
by on May. 12, 2012 at 8:45 AM
I should mention that it took 7 days for my milk to come in with DS during which time he lost too much weight and was jaundice and I had to suppliment with formula after BFing and struggled with very low supply for months even though DS nursed almost constantly and i was eating & drinking plenty and eating oatmeal, mother's milk tea and fenugreek. I'm really trying to avoid the low supply thos time because that was a really rough struggle. I'm almost hoping for a small over supply this time to build a freezer stash, but I don't want struggle with a severe over supply which I understand can be quite difficult, too. I'm so torn!
I will be 36 weeks pregnant tomorrow and I'm pretty certain these babes are staying put for another week or so, so they should be big healthy full term boys.
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Marti123
by Bronze Member on May. 12, 2012 at 10:09 AM
I would just put babies to breast, and leave them there, nursing on demand, no clocks. Personally I wouldn't mess with the pump unless this tactic results in low diaper counts. Simply because pumping is such a PIA. But there is no concrete black and white answer, I understand where you LC is coming from as well. Good luck! And congrats!
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gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on May. 12, 2012 at 12:54 PM

Second time around milk will be in faster. Aso, know that normal loss for a vaginal birth is 10%, for a c-sec is about 12%. (And if mom gets lots of IV fluids it's also 12%.)

A lot of hospitals bamboozle new moms with losses under those percentages.

carolyntx
by Bronze Member on May. 12, 2012 at 1:17 PM
There's no for sure answer, but to me, and coming from a twin mom, nothing brought on my supply like when I was finally able to get both babies to breast. the pump will not stimulate supply like those babies :)

Sounds like you'll be blessed to have big healthy twins and I'd say just go at ebfing to begin with, watch diapers. If you're super worried about having to supplement just pump once or twice a day to have incase or to build freezer stash, but unless there are feeding issues there should be no need. Keep us updated!
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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 12, 2012 at 2:04 PM
The only reasons to wait a few weeks before you start pumping are:

Pumping on top of 100% breastfeeding can lead to you bringing in an oversupply of milk, which can cause problems.

It is usually best to focus your time and energy on nursing your babies. Pumping takes time away from that.

You want all of babies feedings to be at the breast so they can learn to nurse and bring in your supply, so all you can do with that milk is stick it in the freezer, and that can wait a few weeks.

You may have a good reason to begin pumping right away:

If babies are to young/small/weak to latch and need to have a feeding tube you will pump to provide colostrum/milk for them, and to bring in your supply.

If babies are nursing, but not getting enough, you can pump/hand express to provide supplements for the while you work on getting them breastfeeding better.
tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on May. 12, 2012 at 6:23 PM

I personally feel if pumping a bit after they are born gives you peace of mind then do it...be very watchful and dont pump a whole lot once milk comes IN.

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