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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Pumping before birth??

Posted by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:35 PM
  • 12 Replies

 I'm 27 weeks into my first pregnancy, my milk started coming in about a month ago. I get intense pain that doesn't supside until they start leaking on their own or I just squeeze them, would expressing relieve this pain?? Also I am extremely worried I wont be able to supply my son after he's born since I'm returning to work (I'm not working during my pregnancy). A couple of ppl has suggested pumping and freezing now while I have the time and to relieve engorgement I'd rather have an oversupply then an undersupply. What do you think?? Is this a good idea?

Lilypie Maternity tickers
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:35 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Whitney15
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:35 PM
Is it milk, or just colostrum?
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gumbeme06
by Sara on May. 12, 2012 at 11:38 PM
Your milk doesn't come in until about 2-4 days after delivery. It's probably just colostrum I wouldn't pump now... Nipple stimulation can start labor.
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collinsmommy0
by Gold Member on May. 12, 2012 at 11:38 PM
No do not pump.

It can cause contractions.

It will only be colostrum and does not have an affect on your milk supply if you pump
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ConnorMom228
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:41 PM
You don't have milk yet. It's only colostrum. An pumping while pregnant is a very bad idea. Too much can cause preterm labor. You don't want that.

Milk only comes in AFTER baby is born. There is no real supply right now. A lot of women grow boobs while pregnant and aren't used to the size. And a lot of women leak during pregnancy. Just use nursing pads. And the pain could just be the sudden growth. NOT engorgement.
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1stpreggers
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:41 PM

 

Quoting Whitney15:

Is it milk, or just colostrum?

 I'm really not sure its a milky white color.

Lilypie Maternity tickers
JocelynsMama1
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:43 PM

No don't pump now...you can put yourself into labor. Its ok to take a warm shower to relieve some of the pain but they shouldne be engorged yet....bigger yes but engorgement and milk dont fully come in untill after baby is born although plenty of women leak way before delivery

1stpreggers
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:44 PM

 

Quoting ConnorMom228:

You don't have milk yet. It's only colostrum. An pumping while pregnant is a very bad idea. Too much can cause preterm labor. You don't want that.

Milk only comes in AFTER baby is born. There is no real supply right now. A lot of women grow boobs while pregnant and aren't used to the size. And a lot of women leak during pregnancy. Just use nursing pads. And the pain could just be the sudden growth. NOT engorgement.

 My cup sized hasnt changed since about 22 weeks, I thought it was engorgment because (TMI) they get extremely warm to the touch and my viens bulge. Is there anything to do for the pain ? Ive tried warm showers but it doesn't make a difference.

Lilypie Maternity tickers
1stpreggers
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:44 PM

 Thanks! I had no idea about the contractions!

maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on May. 12, 2012 at 11:49 PM
2 moms liked this

It is colostrum, not mature milk. You will only produce small amounts of colostrum (think teaspoons) until your baby is born, which will signal your body to begin producing mature milk.

Pumping is discouraged before delivery because it can possible cause contactions and pre-term labor. Also, you will only get small amouts of colostrum that is really only meant to meet the needs of baby in the first few days. Even if you could pump and store enough of it, it is not what your baby will need when you go back to work.

Expressing milk before delivery has not been shown to increase milk production after baby arrives.

The key to maintaining a full milk supply after you go back to work is to pump every at work day the amount baby needs at daycare.

More info for you:

How much milk should I have stored in my freezer?

Many mothers find that it really decreases their stress before going back to work if they know that they don't need to worry too much about creating a large freezer stash of milk. Instead they can use their maternity leave to focus on being with their babies and on getting breastfeeding well-established. If you have enough milk to send with your baby on your first day, then you have enough in the freezer.

It is important to express as much milk while you are at work as baby needs during that time. If your baby needs 10 ounces while you are at work, then you need to pump at least 10 ounces each day. If, for example, you were to only pump 8 ounces and send 2 ounces from the freezer each day you will no longer be expressing the amount of milk your baby requires. Your body will “think” that baby needs 2 fewer ounces each day than he really does. If you start to run out of milk in your freezer, you may face the difficult decision of how to meet your baby’s needs.

Using this system, you express each day what your baby would need the next day, and only use the small freezer stash for emergencies.

In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible. Freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando 2006) (Buckley & Charles 2006). Whether fresh or frozen, your milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs, and you can count on your milk to support your baby in all areas of growth and development.

Here is a schedule many working mothers recommend for using frozen milk. Your baby gets mostly fresh milk and the best possible nutrition and antibodies to protect from illness:
  • Pump on Monday; give to your babysitter to use on Tuesday.
  • Pump on Tuesday; use on Wednesday and so on until Friday.
  • Pump on Friday, label with the date, and freeze; put in the back of the freezer.
  • Use the oldest milk in the freezer for Monday.
  • Use your freezer stash only when you have an unusual need for extra milk, for example, when your baby is going through a growth spurt or if you spill all of your freshly pumped milk.

This system prevents the frozen milk from getting too old and needing to be thrown out. Another option would be to refrigerate Friday’s milk over the weekend and let your babysitter use it on Monday. This practice would preserve more of the antibodies in Friday’s milk but wouldn't keep your frozen milk from going out of date
.
Braydens_Mama11
by on May. 12, 2012 at 11:53 PM
1 mom liked this
Good advice

Quoting maggiemom2000:

It is colostrum, not mature milk. You will only produce small amounts of colostrum (think teaspoons) until your baby is born, which will signal your body to begin producing mature milk.

Pumping is discouraged before delivery because it can possible cause contactions and pre-term labor. Also, you will only get small amouts of colostrum that is really only meant to meet the needs of baby in the first few days. Even if you could pump and store enough of it, it is not what your baby will need when you go back to work.

Expressing milk before delivery has not been shown to increase milk production after baby arrives.

The key to maintaining a full milk supply after you go back to work is to pump every at work day the amount baby needs at daycare.

More info for you:

How much milk should I have stored in my freezer?

Many mothers find that it really decreases their stress before going back to work if they know that they don't need to worry too much about creating a large freezer stash of milk. Instead they can use their maternity leave to focus on being with their babies and on getting breastfeeding well-established. If you have enough milk to send with your baby on your first day, then you have enough in the freezer.

It is important to express as much milk while you are at work as baby needs during that time. If your baby needs 10 ounces while you are at work, then you need to pump at least 10 ounces each day. If, for example, you were to only pump 8 ounces and send 2 ounces from the freezer each day you will no longer be expressing the amount of milk your baby requires. Your body will “think” that baby needs 2 fewer ounces each day than he really does. If you start to run out of milk in your freezer, you may face the difficult decision of how to meet your baby’s needs.

Using this system, you express each day what your baby would need the next day, and only use the small freezer stash for emergencies.

In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible. Freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando 2006) (Buckley & Charles 2006). Whether fresh or frozen, your milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs, and you can count on your milk to support your baby in all areas of growth and development.

Here is a schedule many working mothers recommend for using frozen milk. Your baby gets mostly fresh milk and the best possible nutrition and antibodies to protect from illness:
  • Pump on Monday; give to your babysitter to use on Tuesday.
  • Pump on Tuesday; use on Wednesday and so on until Friday.
  • Pump on Friday, label with the date, and freeze; put in the back of the freezer.
  • Use the oldest milk in the freezer for Monday.
  • Use your freezer stash only when you have an unusual need for extra milk, for example, when your baby is going through a growth spurt or if you spill all of your freshly pumped milk.

This system prevents the frozen milk from getting too old and needing to be thrown out. Another option would be to refrigerate Friday’s milk over the weekend and let your babysitter use it on Monday. This practice would preserve more of the antibodies in Friday’s milk but wouldn't keep your frozen milk from going out of date
.
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