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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

New breastfeeding mother

Posted by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 10:00 AM
  • 15 Replies

My lil man is a week old today. He latches great and eats great. He actually gets done in like 10 mins. Hes a fast eater. I'm producing alot. I have to pump too because he of course doesn't eat that much right now. I don't pump after every feeding but when I do pump I get about 1.5oz - 2.5oz just depending. Now my concern is his spitting up! My lactation consultant told me he spits up because he eats to much and his lil tummy doesnt need that much. It concerns me because I didn't think breastfeed babies should spit up this much. I don't lay him down right after a feeding because when I do its worse. And like last night he wanted to eat every hour. I tried to give him his paci but he wanted me. Is there anything I can do to try and prevent this spit up or am I just gonna have to live with it for awhile? Any advice helps, Thanks!

Lilypie - (LrYR)

Lilypie - (z1Zf)

by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 10:00 AM
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Replies (1-10):
lovinmyboys...
by Member on Jun. 15, 2012 at 10:03 AM
1 mom liked this
It will eventually get better. You may want to try laying back a little so the flow is not so fast. It might help him to slow down.
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Jessica181989
by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 10:11 AM

Ok thanks! 

Quoting lovinmyboys...:

It will eventually get better. You may want to try laying back a little so the flow is not so fast. It might help him to slow down.


Lilypie - (LrYR)

Lilypie - (z1Zf)

larissalarie
by Platinum Member on Jun. 15, 2012 at 10:16 AM
Spit up is very normal. Immature digestive system combined with an all liquid diet and laying down most of the time...kinda inevitable.

You really don't need to pump. Just nurse baby on demand and your supply will adjust. Don't try to delay feedings with a pacifier. If you keep pumping, you are going to give yourself a big time oversupply which actually isn't as good as it sounds :-)
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BridgetMc
by Bronze Member on Jun. 15, 2012 at 10:37 AM
I agree with pp, pumping will only make your problem worse. If you need to get a stash wait until your supply has regulated, usually around 6 weeks. Then you can pump without increasing supply too much. Also, my 4 month old was a major spitter from birth and she ended up being sensitive to dairy. You might try cutting dairy to see if that helps with the excessive spitting. Even though I cut out dairy my baby still spits up but not as much and not as often.
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Jessica181989
by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 2:20 PM
My lacation consultant told me to pump because I have such a big supply. And if I don't pump it hurts. And I'm going back to work at 4 weeks. Single mother can't afford to be out to long. So I want a good supply.
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Precious333
by Group Mod-Julia on Jun. 15, 2012 at 2:52 PM
what you can do is hand express or pump just enough to relieve the engorgement....but so NOT empty out the breast because it will cause your body to keep making more than it needs. I would also block feed right now as well. Nurs only one side for two or so feedings. Only if yoy become engorged do you need to express just enough to relieve the engorgement. Doing this may help with the spitting up.


Quoting Jessica181989:

My lacation consultant told me to pump because I have such a big supply. And if I don't pump it hurts. And I'm going back to work at 4 weeks. Single mother can't afford to be out to long. So I want a good supply.

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NicholeLoraine
by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 2:56 PM
Pump and freeze so you have enough to go back to work but don't pump just because it hurts
Your body gets use to how much is needed and will calm down on production if you aren't pumping so much

As for spit up babies spit up too if they are not burped good
So you can try that as well
GL momma
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SAHM927
by Bronze Member on Jun. 15, 2012 at 3:03 PM
Sounds like you have oversupply. Avoid pumping so your body can adjust according to baby. And try block feeding. One side at a time. Do you spray milk when you have a let down? It could also be over-active letdown. Look all this up on kellymom.com. There is great information. Burp him frequently during feedings as well.
catholicmamamia
by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 4:26 PM

You have been given good advice so I will add.. hang in there, it gets better! 



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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Jun. 15, 2012 at 5:02 PM


Quoting Jessica181989:

My lacation consultant told me to pump because I have such a big supply. And if I don't pump it hurts. And I'm going back to work at 4 weeks. Single mother can't afford to be out to long. So I want a good supply.

You have created and maintained an oversupply by continuing to pump so much. This is what can happen when mom has too much milk:

http://www.llli.org/faq/oversupply.html

When a mother has more milk than her baby can handle, the following behaviors may be common:

  • Baby cries a lot, and is often very irritable and/or restless
  • Baby may sometimes gulp, choke, sputter, or cough during feedings at breast
  • Baby may seem to bite or clamp down on the nipple while feeding
  • Milk sprays when baby comes off, especially at the beginning of a feeding
  • Mother may have sore nipples
  • Baby may arch and hold himself very stiffly, sometimes screaming
  • Feedings often seem like battles, with baby nursing fitfully on and off
  • Feedings may be short, lasting only 5 or 10 minutes total
  • Baby may seem to have a "love-hate" relationship with the breast
  • Baby may burp or pass gas frequently between feedings, tending to spit up a lot
  • Baby may have green, watery or foamy, explosive stools
  • Mother's breasts feel very full most of the time
  • Mother may have frequent plugged ducts, which can sometimes lead to mastitis (breast infection)


If many of these experiences seem familiar to you, it may be because you have an overabundant supply of milk, which can cause a forceful milk ejection (sometimes referred to as overactive let-down), and/or foremilk-hindmilk imbalance.[1][2] The infant behaviors described above are caused by these issues but may frequently be misdiagnosed as colic, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergy, reflux, or hypertonicity (stiff muscle tone).

Gradually decrease your pumping until you are only pumping once a day, first thing in the morning. Here's some more info for you:


How often should I express milk?

Once a day is usually plenty to start. Most moms find they are able to express the most milk in the morning hours. You can nurse your baby on one side and express milk on the other side or express both sides about one hour after baby’s first morning feeding. Don’t worry if you don’t get very much milk at first. It takes practice, and your body needs to “learn” to make milk for that extra “feeding.” Any milk collected during these practice sessions can be stored in the freezer.

How much milk should I have stored in my freezer?


Many mothers find that it really decreases their stress before going back to work if they know that they don't need to worry too much about creating a large freezer stash of milk. Instead they can use their maternity leave to focus on being with their babies and on getting breastfeeding well-established. If you have enough milk to send with your baby on your first day, then you have enough in the freezer.

It is important to express as much milk while you are at work as baby needs during that time. If your baby needs 10 ounces while you are at work, then you need to pump at least 10 ounces each day. If, for example, you were to only pump 8 ounces and send 2 ounces from the freezer each day you will no longer be expressing the amount of milk your baby requires. Your body will “think” that baby needs 2 fewer ounces each day than he really does. If you start to run out of milk in your freezer, you may face the difficult decision of how to meet your baby’s needs.

Using this system, you express each day what your baby would need the next day, and only use the small freezer stash for emergencies.

How much milk will my baby need while I’m away?

Breastfed babies drink, on average, 24 to 32 ounces of milk per day (Kent et al., 2006). If you spread that amount over 24 hours it equals 1-1.25 ounces per hour. With that information in mind, plan on leaving about 1-1.25 ounces of milk per hour of separation. Most breastfed babies need no more than 2-4 ounces at each feeding (Kent et al., 2006). Breastfed babies need less milk than formula-fed babies do, and unlike with formula, the amount of breastmilk your baby needs does not increase as he grows bigger. When you return to work, your baby will need only a portion of this daily amount of milk from the care provider, because he will still be getting much of it by breastfeeding during the hours of the day and night when you are together.

Offering smaller bottles, of no more than 2-4 ounces, means there is less chance that your baby will not finish his bottle, leaving milk that will be thrown away.

How many times do I need to express milk at work?


How many times you pump at work will depend on a few factors: how long you are away from baby; how well you respond to milk expression; and your work situation. Many working moms aim for expressing milk at least every 3 hours. If you are becoming engorged between expressing times, you may need to express more frequently. Every mother has her own “magic number” and will differ in how frequently she needs to express her milk to both maintain milk production and provide enough expressed milk for her baby.

Because your goal is to express today what your baby needs tomorrow, you know you are expressing enough when you are able to pump at least the amount that your baby needs.

What if I can’t stop to express my milk as frequently as I should?

When it is challenging to find enough time to express your milk here are some time saving options:
  • You most likely do not need to wash out your pump parts every time, and that can reduce the amount of time you spend during break or during your lunch period.
  • Breastmilk can be kept at room temperature for 6-8 hours (ABM, 2004). Keep your pump parts and bottles of milk in a cool place; covering them with a cool towel will help.
  • Some mothers place all of their pump parts in the refrigerator along with their bottles of expressed milk, each time they pump. At the end of the day they take all of the parts home to wash.
  • Consider arranging your schedule so that you can arrive at work 15 minutes before you need to “clock in” and pump before you start work.
  • If you don’t have enough time to completely drain your breasts, it is still valuable to stop and express some milk, even if it is only for 5 minutes.
  • If you are driving for a during your work hours, you can consider purchasing a car adapter for your pump, along with a hands free pumping bra ( or you can make your own) link: http://www.sleepingbaby.net/jan/Baby/pumping_braconvert.html so that you can pump hands-free. For your safety, Breastfeeding USA recommends that you pull over to express milk and that you don’t do so while driving.

How should I store the milk I express at work. Do I put it all in the freezer?

In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible. Freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando 2006) (Buckley & Charles 2006). Whether fresh or frozen, your milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs, and you can count on your milk to support your baby in all areas of growth and development.

Here is a schedule many working mothers recommend for using frozen milk. Your baby gets mostly fresh milk and the best possible nutrition and antibodies to protect from illness:

  • Pump on Monday; give to your babysitter to use on Tuesday.
  • Pump on Tuesday; use on Wednesday and so on until Friday.
  • Pump on Friday, label with the date, and freeze; put in the back of the freezer.
  • Use the oldest milk in the freezer for Monday.
  • Use your freezer stash only when you have an unusual need for extra milk, for example, when your baby is going through a growth spurt or if you spill all of your freshly pumped milk.

This system prevents the frozen milk from getting too old and needing to be thrown out. Another option would be to refrigerate Friday’s milk over the weekend and let your babysitter use it on Monday. This practice would preserve more of the antibodies in Friday’s milk but wouldn't keep your frozen milk from going out of date.
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