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Worried about my little man

Posted by on Jun. 29, 2012 at 2:08 PM
  • 28 Replies
So I am exclusively breastfeeding my ds, he's had zero formula or anything else, he's 2wks old. I have developed mastitis, & since yesterday (the day before is when I started feeling effects) He's been spitting up more than usual. Last night he covered half the boppy pillow, & some of himself spitting up. He will whine & curl up & cry & spit up, & his poop has a stinky smell now (before it was a tiny smell but nothing that you really noticed).
Can mastitis effect him?
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by on Jun. 29, 2012 at 2:08 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Precious333
by Group Mod-Julia on Jun. 29, 2012 at 2:10 PM

no, mastitis does not cause that.

Are you on antibiotics? Maybe its the antibiotics he's sensitive to or maybe he has a virus? OAL can also cause some of these symptoms as well.

K8wizzo
by Kate on Jun. 29, 2012 at 2:12 PM

Here's some good mastitis info.  The milk that is stuck can have a different flavor and come out stringy, but it is safe for baby to drink.  It's possible that the abx for your uti and your mastitis could be causing the stinky poop and perhaps the spit up as well.  You can take probiotics opposite your abx doses and also give him some.

Young_Mommy89
by on Jun. 29, 2012 at 2:16 PM
Would it happen within a few mins of taking the antibiotics?

Oh & its not my OAL I express before feedings


Quoting K8wizzo:

Here's some good mastitis info.  The milk that is stuck can have a different flavor and come out stringy, but it is safe for baby to drink.  It's possible that the abx for your uti and your mastitis could be causing the stinky poop and perhaps the spit up as well.  You can take probiotics opposite your abx doses and also give him some.

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K8wizzo
by Kate on Jun. 29, 2012 at 2:37 PM

Weren't you on different ones before getting sick last night?

Quoting Young_Mommy89:

Would it happen within a few mins of taking the antibiotics?

Oh & its not my OAL I express before feedings


Quoting K8wizzo:

Here's some good mastitis info.  The milk that is stuck can have a different flavor and come out stringy, but it is safe for baby to drink.  It's possible that the abx for your uti and your mastitis could be causing the stinky poop and perhaps the spit up as well.  You can take probiotics opposite your abx doses and also give him some.


Young_Mommy89
by on Jun. 29, 2012 at 2:42 PM
No I just got them yesterday & didn't take them until getting home late last night

Quoting K8wizzo:

Weren't you on different ones before getting sick last night?

Quoting Young_Mommy89:

Would it happen within a few mins of taking the antibiotics?



Oh & its not my OAL I express before feedings




Quoting K8wizzo:

Here's some good mastitis info.  The milk that is stuck can have a different flavor and come out stringy, but it is safe for baby to drink.  It's possible that the abx for your uti and your mastitis could be causing the stinky poop and perhaps the spit up as well.  You can take probiotics opposite your abx doses and also give him some.


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aimhawk
by Bronze Member on Jun. 29, 2012 at 3:14 PM

BUMP!

maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Jun. 29, 2012 at 4:37 PM


Quoting Young_Mommy89:

Would it happen within a few mins of taking the antibiotics?

Oh & its not my OAL I express before feedings

When you have an oversupply of milk, spitting up is a common symptom for baby, and mastitis is a common symptom for mom.
You mentin expressing before feeding. How much are you expressing? Are you just letting the first let down flow into a towel or are you pumping or hand expressing? That could be the cause of the problem.
You may need to stop expressing and do some block feeding. Here's some info for you:
http://www.llli.org/faq/oversupply.html

When a mother has more milk than her baby can handle, the following behaviors may be common:

  • Baby cries a lot, and is often very irritable and/or restless
  • Baby may sometimes gulp, choke, sputter, or cough during feedings at breast
  • Baby may seem to bite or clamp down on the nipple while feeding
  • Milk sprays when baby comes off, especially at the beginning of a feeding
  • Mother may have sore nipples
  • Baby may arch and hold himself very stiffly, sometimes screaming
  • Feedings often seem like battles, with baby nursing fitfully on and off
  • Feedings may be short, lasting only 5 or 10 minutes total
  • Baby may seem to have a "love-hate" relationship with the breast
  • Baby may burp or pass gas frequently between feedings, tending to spit up a lot
  • Baby may have green, watery or foamy, explosive stools
  • Mother's breasts feel very full most of the time
  • Mother may have frequent plugged ducts, which can sometimes lead to mastitis (breast infection)

If many of these experiences seem familiar to you, it may be because you have an overabundant supply of milk, which can cause a forceful milk ejection (sometimes referred to as overactive let-down), and/or foremilk-hindmilk imbalance.[1][2] The infant behaviors described above are caused by these issues but may frequently be misdiagnosed as colic, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergy, reflux, or hypertonicity (stiff muscle tone).

Since mothers with oversupply often produce enough milk in each breast for a full feeding, one strategy that can be very successful is to feed the baby on only one side per feeding. If your baby wants to nurse again within two hours, see how he responds if you continue to offer that same side. In the next two hours, offer only the other breast. The breasts should gradually slow down their rate of milk production because milk is being removed less often. This helps down-regulate the milk production rate to match baby's true needs while also reducing the amount of foremilk and lactose baby receives.[3] When you keep baby at the same breast for a longer period of time, it also ensures that your baby is fully draining the breast and getting more of the higher calorie hindmilk.

If you are uncomfortable on the breast that is not being used before you are ready to nurse on it again, you can hand express or pump for only a few moments (20-30 seconds or less), just enough to relieve some discomfort. Do not pump too much or you will signal your breasts to produce even more milk. There is a certain whey protein in the milk, called "Feedback Inhibitor of Lactation" (FIL), that begins to build up and concentrate when milk is not removed for a while. This protein needs to be allowed to build up high enough to trigger the breast to cut back milk production. By removing just barely enough milk to be comfortable, but still allowing the breast to be full enough to trigger the "cut back milk production" message, most mothers can decrease milk production without risking plugged ducts or a breast infection. Many mothers find that cold compresses -- chilled raw green cabbage leaves or a bag of frozen peas -- help ease the discomfort and reduce swelling from being overly full.

You will know the strategy of feeding only on one side for extended periods is working when your baby becomes less fussy and seems more satisfied between feedings, and his stool becomes less watery and more yellow. He will also gulp, choke, and sputter less during feedings, because the milk is not flowing as fast.

If you find that your baby is still having difficulty after four to seven days of feeding only on one breast per feeding, you may need to breastfeed on just one breast for a longer period of time (two or three feedings or even longer) in order to decrease your milk production further. Some mothers with extreme oversupply may need to feed only on one breast for as long as 12 hours. It is best to extend the time on one breast very slowly and carefully, going longer only if milk production is not slowing down. Feeding on one side for too long could lead to decreasing milk production too much. (Most mothers with oversupply find that it is easy to regain adequate milk production with a few additional pumping sessions.)

If you have very enthusiastic breasts and the strategy of feeding on only one side for extended periods is not taming them yet, you may need to try a more extreme structured approach that initially does include some pumping. Start by pumping both sides thoroughly so that your breasts are fairly soft about an hour before a feeding. Then feed on one breast for several feedings until that breast is completely soft and comfortable and the other breast starts to feel unbearably full. When you feel unbearably full, switch sides and feed on the second breast until the first breast starts to feel unbearably full. It may be necessary to pump both sides a second time during the day, both for comfort and to ward off plugged ducts. For the next several days, continue to feed on one breast until the other one feels overfull. This will result in keeping baby to one side for several hours before switching to the other side. As your body is allowed to get the "overfull" message, it will respond by slowing the rate of milk production, and pumping should gradually become unnecessary.

Young_Mommy89
by on Jun. 29, 2012 at 4:46 PM
I hand express a good bit...I soak through blankets. If I don't he will keep unlatching & my milk will run down my breast & side & squirt, which gets all over both of us.

I'm scared longer block feeding will cause my breasts to be even more uneven than they already are


Quoting maggiemom2000:



Quoting Young_Mommy89:

Would it happen within a few mins of taking the antibiotics?



Oh & its not my OAL I express before feedings

When you have an oversupply of milk, spitting up is a common symptom for baby, and mastitis is a common symptom for mom.
You mentin expressing before feeding. How much are you expressing? Are you just letting the first let down flow into a towel or are you pumping or hand expressing? That could be the cause of the problem.
You may need to stop expressing and do some block feeding. Here's some info for you:
http://www.llli.org/faq/oversupply.html

When a mother has more milk than her baby can handle, the following behaviors may be common:

  • Baby cries a lot, and is often very irritable and/or restless
  • Baby may sometimes gulp, choke, sputter, or cough during feedings at breast
  • Baby may seem to bite or clamp down on the nipple while feeding
  • Milk sprays when baby comes off, especially at the beginning of a feeding
  • Mother may have sore nipples
  • Baby may arch and hold himself very stiffly, sometimes screaming
  • Feedings often seem like battles, with baby nursing fitfully on and off
  • Feedings may be short, lasting only 5 or 10 minutes total
  • Baby may seem to have a "love-hate" relationship with the breast
  • Baby may burp or pass gas frequently between feedings, tending to spit up a lot
  • Baby may have green, watery or foamy, explosive stools
  • Mother's breasts feel very full most of the time
  • Mother may have frequent plugged ducts, which can sometimes lead to mastitis (breast infection)

If many of these experiences seem familiar to you, it may be because you have an overabundant supply of milk, which can cause a forceful milk ejection (sometimes referred to as overactive let-down), and/or foremilk-hindmilk imbalance.[1][2] The infant behaviors described above are caused by these issues but may frequently be misdiagnosed as colic, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergy, reflux, or hypertonicity (stiff muscle tone).

Since mothers with oversupply often produce enough milk in each breast for a full feeding, one strategy that can be very successful is to feed the baby on only one side per feeding. If your baby wants to nurse again within two hours, see how he responds if you continue to offer that same side. In the next two hours, offer only the other breast. The breasts should gradually slow down their rate of milk production because milk is being removed less often. This helps down-regulate the milk production rate to match baby's true needs while also reducing the amount of foremilk and lactose baby receives.[3] When you keep baby at the same breast for a longer period of time, it also ensures that your baby is fully draining the breast and getting more of the higher calorie hindmilk.

If you are uncomfortable on the breast that is not being used before you are ready to nurse on it again, you can hand express or pump for only a few moments (20-30 seconds or less), just enough to relieve some discomfort. Do not pump too much or you will signal your breasts to produce even more milk. There is a certain whey protein in the milk, called "Feedback Inhibitor of Lactation" (FIL), that begins to build up and concentrate when milk is not removed for a while. This protein needs to be allowed to build up high enough to trigger the breast to cut back milk production. By removing just barely enough milk to be comfortable, but still allowing the breast to be full enough to trigger the "cut back milk production" message, most mothers can decrease milk production without risking plugged ducts or a breast infection. Many mothers find that cold compresses -- chilled raw green cabbage leaves or a bag of frozen peas -- help ease the discomfort and reduce swelling from being overly full.

You will know the strategy of feeding only on one side for extended periods is working when your baby becomes less fussy and seems more satisfied between feedings, and his stool becomes less watery and more yellow. He will also gulp, choke, and sputter less during feedings, because the milk is not flowing as fast.

If you find that your baby is still having difficulty after four to seven days of feeding only on one breast per feeding, you may need to breastfeed on just one breast for a longer period of time (two or three feedings or even longer) in order to decrease your milk production further. Some mothers with extreme oversupply may need to feed only on one breast for as long as 12 hours. It is best to extend the time on one breast very slowly and carefully, going longer only if milk production is not slowing down. Feeding on one side for too long could lead to decreasing milk production too much. (Most mothers with oversupply find that it is easy to regain adequate milk production with a few additional pumping sessions.)

If you have very enthusiastic breasts and the strategy of feeding on only one side for extended periods is not taming them yet, you may need to try a more extreme structured approach that initially does include some pumping. Start by pumping both sides thoroughly so that your breasts are fairly soft about an hour before a feeding. Then feed on one breast for several feedings until that breast is completely soft and comfortable and the other breast starts to feel unbearably full. When you feel unbearably full, switch sides and feed on the second breast until the first breast starts to feel unbearably full. It may be necessary to pump both sides a second time during the day, both for comfort and to ward off plugged ducts. For the next several days, continue to feed on one breast until the other one feels overfull. This will result in keeping baby to one side for several hours before switching to the other side. As your body is allowed to get the "overfull" message, it will respond by slowing the rate of milk production, and pumping should gradually become unnecessary.

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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Jun. 29, 2012 at 4:53 PM

I was scared to death to try block feeding! I had constant plugged ducts and mastitis and was afraid to let the milk stay in there like that. Turns out my fears were just fears and it was the best thing I could do!

Don't worry at thsi point about uneven, you can always deal with that later. Uneven does not cause problems, oversupply does! You can always do longer blocks with the bigger producer to try and even things out.

Since you are already expressing before feeding, this method may work well for both of you:

Start by pumping both sides thoroughly so that your breasts are fairly soft about an hour before a feeding. Then feed on one breast for several feedings until that breast is completely soft and comfortable and the other breast starts to feel unbearably full. When you feel unbearably full, switch sides and feed on the second breast until the first breast starts to feel unbearably full. It may be necessary to pump both sides a second time during the day, both for comfort and to ward off plugged ducts. For the next several days, continue to feed on one breast until the other one feels overfull. This will result in keeping baby to one side for several hours before switching to the other side. As your body is allowed to get the "overfull" message, it will respond by slowing the rate of milk production, and pumping should gradually become unnecessary.

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You must be a member to reply to this post.
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