Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

One boob is fuller than the other?

Posted by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 10:19 AM
  • 6 Replies

 Whenever i pump at work, i only get like 2 oz from my right and 5 from my left...what gives???

by on Sep. 10, 2012 at 10:19 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-6):
melindabelcher
by mel on Sep. 10, 2012 at 10:23 AM
Very normal to have one breast that responds better to a pump.
Very abnormal to get the amounts your pumping! Holy moly!!! 0.5-2oz total combined is normal pumping output!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
hello_kitty25
by Member on Sep. 10, 2012 at 10:26 AM

 thats what i hear! but i kinda glad im over producing a bit! cause i get nervous when my frozen supply goes down like im not going to have enough when i go to work and will have to supplement! nooooo!!!! we have about 80 oz in the freezer in 4 oz bags right now, and i pump with my double electric pump about every 3-4 hours at work.

Quoting melindabelcher:

Very normal to have one breast that responds better to a pump.
Very abnormal to get the amounts your pumping! Holy moly!!! 0.5-2oz total combined is normal pumping output!


melindabelcher
by mel on Sep. 10, 2012 at 10:29 AM
Why does your frozen supply go down?
As long as your following the 1-1.25oz per hr no larger then 3oz every 2.5hr with a slow flow nipple you'll be fine


Quoting hello_kitty25:

 thats what i hear! but i kinda glad im over producing a bit! cause i get nervous when my frozen supply goes down like im not going to have enough when i go to work and will have to supplement! nooooo!!!! we have about 80 oz in the freezer in 4 oz bags right now, and i pump with my double electric pump about every 3-4 hours at work.

Quoting melindabelcher:

Very normal to have one breast that responds better to a pump.

Very abnormal to get the amounts your pumping! Holy moly!!! 0.5-2oz total combined is normal pumping output!



Posted on CafeMom Mobile
hello_kitty25
by Member on Sep. 10, 2012 at 10:34 AM

 it goes down when my dh uses it to feed baby while im at work. so he should only be eating 3oz every 2.3 hr? i think that sounds about right. he says he will eat like 2 oz. then 3 or 4 hours later eat 5oz. then 3 hours later another 1-2 oz. very sporadic. we use the 5oz NUK bottles, is that slow flow?

 so should i bag up the milk in 3 oz instead of 4 or 5?

Quoting melindabelcher:

Why does your frozen supply go down?
As long as your following the 1-1.25oz per hr no larger then 3oz every 2.5hr with a slow flow nipple you'll be fine


Quoting hello_kitty25:

 thats what i hear! but i kinda glad im over producing a bit! cause i get nervous when my frozen supply goes down like im not going to have enough when i go to work and will have to supplement! nooooo!!!! we have about 80 oz in the freezer in 4 oz bags right now, and i pump with my double electric pump about every 3-4 hours at work.

Quoting melindabelcher:

Very normal to have one breast that responds better to a pump.

Very abnormal to get the amounts your pumping! Holy moly!!! 0.5-2oz total combined is normal pumping output!




melindabelcher
by mel on Sep. 10, 2012 at 10:49 AM
sounds like hes overfeeding. In general frozen is extra for emergency like caught in traffic or mandated at work. what you pump today you take what baby needs tommorow the rest goes in the freezer. if your gone 8hrs you'd leave 8-10oz. Thats all baby needs any more is overfeeding.
I believe the nuk 5oz is slow flow


Quoting hello_kitty25:

 it goes down when my dh uses it to feed baby while im at work. so he should only be eating 3oz every 2.3 hr? i think that sounds about right. he says he will eat like 2 oz. then 3 or 4 hours later eat 5oz. then 3 hours later another 1-2 oz. very sporadic. we use the 5oz NUK bottles, is that slow flow?

 so should i bag up the milk in 3 oz instead of 4 or 5?

Quoting melindabelcher:

Why does your frozen supply go down?

As long as your following the 1-1.25oz per hr no larger then 3oz every 2.5hr with a slow flow nipple you'll be fine





Quoting hello_kitty25:

 thats what i hear! but i kinda glad im over producing a bit! cause i get nervous when my frozen supply goes down like im not going to have enough when i go to work and will have to supplement! nooooo!!!! we have about 80 oz in the freezer in 4 oz bags right now, and i pump with my double electric pump about every 3-4 hours at work.

Quoting melindabelcher:

Very normal to have one breast that responds better to a pump.


Very abnormal to get the amounts your pumping! Holy moly!!! 0.5-2oz total combined is normal pumping output!






Posted on CafeMom Mobile
maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Sep. 10, 2012 at 11:30 AM
1 mom liked this

from 

Preparing for Your Return to Work: The Breastfeeding Mother’s Guide

How much milk should I have stored in my freezer?

Many mothers find that they feel less stress if they to know that they don't need to create a large freezer stash of milk before they return to work. Instead, they can use their maternity leave to focus on being with their babies and getting breastfeeding well-established. If you have enough milk to send with your baby on your first day, then you have enough in the freezer.

It is important to express as much milk while you are at work as your baby needs during that time. If your baby needs 10 ounces while you are away at work, then you need to pump at least 10 ounces each day.
For example:
If you were to only pump 8 ounces and send 2 ounces from the freezer each day, you would not be expressing the amount of milk your baby requires. Your body will “think” that your baby needs 2 fewer ounces each day than he really does, and your production will not match his demand. If you start to run out of milk in your freezer, you may face the difficult decision of how to meet your baby’s needs. Many mothers learn too late that increasing their milk supply to meet their baby’s demands is more complex than it seems. Meeting your child’s daily needs for expressed milk during separation is the best way to avoid difficulties later.

Using the simple system described, you pump each day what your baby would need the next day. This way you only use the small freezer stash for emergencies, such as dropping and spilling a day’s worth of milk, or other milk-related calamities.

Returning to Work: The Breastfeeding Mother’s Guide

How much milk will my baby need while I’m away?

Breastfed babies need, on average, 24 to 32 ounces of milk per day (Kent et al., 2006). If you spread that amount over a full day it equals 1-1.25 ounces per hour. With that information in mind, plan on leaving about 1-1.25 ounces of milk for each hour of separation. Most breastfed babies need no more than 2-4 ounces at each feeding (Kent et al., 2006). Breastfed babies need less milk than formula-fed babies do, and unlike with formula, the amount of breastmilk your baby needs does not increase as he grows bigger. When you return to work, your baby will need only a portion of this daily amount of milk from the care provider, because he will still be getting much of it by breastfeeding during the hours of the day and night when you are together.


Offering smaller bottles, of no more than 2-4 ounces, means there is a smaller chance that your baby will not finish his bottle and leave milk that must be thrown away by licensed daycares. 

How many times do I need to express milk at work?

How many times you pump at work will depend on a few factors: how long you are away from baby, how well you respond to milk-expression, and your work situation. Many working moms plan to pump milk at least as often as every 3 hours. If you are becoming engorged between pumping times, you may need to remove milk more frequently. Every mother has her own “magic number” and will differ in how frequently she needs to express her milk to both maintain milk production and provide enough expressed milk for her baby. Try to remove milk as often as it takes to collect enough for your next work day.

How should I store the milk I pump at work? Do I put it all in the freezer?

In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible. Freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando, 2006; Buckley & Charles, 2006). Whether fresh or frozen, your milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs, and you can count on your milk to support your baby in all areas of growth and development.

Here is a schedule many working mothers recommend for using frozen milk. With this system, your baby gets more fresh milk and therefore the best possible nutrition and immune factors to protect him from illness:

  • Pump on Monday; give this milk to your babysitter to use on Tuesday.
  • Pump on Tuesday; use this milk on Wednesday and so on until Friday.
  • Pump on Friday, label with the date, and freeze this milk; put it in the back of the freezer.
  • Use the oldest milk in the freezer for Monday.
  • Use your freezer stash only when you have an unusual need for extra milk, for example, when your baby is going through a growth spurt or you accidentally spill all of your freshly-pumped milk.
This system prevents the frozen milk from getting too old and needing to be thrown out. Another option would be to refrigerate Friday’s milk over the weekend and let your babysitter use it on Monday. This practice would preserve more of the antibodies in Friday’s milk but would not use up your frozen milk before it goes out of date.

What if my baby’s caregiver says my baby needs more milk?

With bottle-feeding, there can be a tendency for the person feeding to encourage the baby to finish the bottle. Milk flows easily from a bottle nipple, even when the baby is not actively sucking, and the faster flow can cause a baby to continue feeding after he is full. Caregivers may believe that a baby needs more milk than he actually does, and many childcare workers are accustomed to the larger amounts of formula they feed many babies. Make sure that your caregiver has the correct information about how much breastmilk a baby needs and understands the difference between bottle-feeding breastmilk and formula. 

You can offer some tips to your baby’s caregiver on how to bottle feed in a way that supports breastfeeding:
  • Use a slow-flow soft bottle nipple that has a wide base and a shorter, round nipple (not the flatter, orthodontic kind).
  • Start by resting the tip of the nipple on the baby's upper lip and allow him to take it into his mouth himself, as if he were nursing.
  • Keep the bottle only slightly tilted, with the baby in a more upright position, so he has to work to get the milk out. If you hold the bottle straight down, the milk will come out too fast, and he may feel overwhelmed by the flow (Kassing, 2002).
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)