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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Back to work blues/ pumping ?

Posted by on Sep. 13, 2012 at 9:41 PM
  • 8 Replies
Hello, I was hoping I could get some advice from all you experienced mama's out there. Paige is my first child. My maternity leave is almost over and I'm heading back to work full time next week. I'm blessed to have my mom caring for her, but I'm feeling just awful about the thought of leaving her. Every time I think about it I'm breaking out into tears..
I'm also concerned about keeping up my milk supply. I will be pumping at work. But how often should I make sure to pump? I really want to at least get 6 months of bf in
Thanks!
by on Sep. 13, 2012 at 9:41 PM
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JeniF
by on Sep. 13, 2012 at 10:35 PM
2 moms liked this

The first few days back are the hardest.  I have two and I wish I knew with my first what I did with my second as far as pumping.

Get a hands free bustier so you can pump both sides at the same time.  Lifesaver.  I took work with me to pump so my boss was happy (I pumped 2 or 3 times a day in those early months)

You have a good 2 phase electric pump?

Starting tomorrow morning and every morning before you go to work, pump one side while you nurse DD on the other.  You'll stock extra milk, take the pressure off what you produce at work, keep up your supply and get more milk out because baby is stimulating you on the other side.  

Keep in mind that on weekends you'll be VERY engorged in the am's because you get used to making all the morning milk.  Just pump away and build your stash.  You can use it later.

Take videos of DD nursing on your phone and watch them while you pump at work.  You'll let down faster and IMO make more 'milk per minute' :-)

Nothing makes this separation easier, but if you can keep pumping you'll feel good knowing you are doing the best thing you can for her.  She will thrive!


maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Sep. 13, 2012 at 10:38 PM
Here's some info for you:

From http://thebreastfeedingmother.blogspot.com/2012/07/returning-to-work-breastfeeding-mothers.html (more info and lots of links in the actual article)

How much milk will my baby need while I’m away?

Breastfed babies need, on average, 24 to 32 ounces of milk per day (Kent et al., 2006). If you spread that amount over a full day it equals 1-1.25 ounces per hour. With that information in mind, plan on leaving about 1-1.25 ounces of milk for each hour of separation. Most breastfed babies need no more than 2-4 ounces at each feeding (Kent et al., 2006). Breastfed babies need less milk than formula-fed babies do, and unlike with formula, the amount of breastmilk your baby needs does not increase as he grows bigger. When you return to work, your baby will need only a portion of this daily amount of milk from the care provider, because he will still be getting much of it by breastfeeding during the hours of the day and night when you are together.

Offering smaller bottles, of no more than 2-4 ounces, means there is a smaller chance that your baby will not finish his bottle and leave milk that must be thrown away by licensed daycares.


How many times do I need to express milk at work?

How many times you pump at work will depend on a few factors: how long you are away from baby, how well you respond to milk-expression, and your work situation. Many working moms plan to pump milk at least as often as every 3 hours. If you are becoming engorged between pumping times, you may need to remove milk more frequently. Every mother has her own “magic number” and will differ in how frequently she needs to express her milk to both maintain milk production and provide enough expressed milk for her baby. Try to remove milk as often as it takes to collect enough for your next work day.


What if I can’t stop to pump as frequently as I would like?

When it is challenging to find enough time to pump your milk, here are some time-saving options:

Breastmilk can be kept at room temperature for 6-8 hours (ABM, 2004). With this guideline in mind, you do not need to take time to wash out your pump parts after every use. Keep your pump parts and bottles of milk in a cool place, and cover them with a cool towel; a small cooler or insulated lunch pack is another option.
Some mothers place all of their pump parts in the refrigerator along with their bottles of expressed milk each time they pump. At the end of the day, they take all of the parts home to wash.
Consider arranging your schedule so that you can arrive at work 15 minutes before you need to “clock in” and pump before you start work. 
If you don’t have enough time to completely drain your breasts, it is still valuable to stop and express some milk, even if it you only have 5 minutes.
If expressing in your car could help you save some time, consider purchasing a car adapter for your pump and a hands-free pumping bra (or you can make your own) so that you can pump with your hands free. For your safety, we recommend that you do not express milk while driving.
If you are mobile during your work hours, a cooler for your milk will help preserve your milk at a lower temperature, and you can save time by expressing milk whenever you have an opportunity.


How should I store the milk I pump at work? Do I put it all in the freezer?

In order for your baby to get the most anti-infective properties from your milk, it is best to offer it fresh whenever possible. Freezing has been found to denature some of the antibodies and kill some of the living cells in milk (Orlando, 2006; Buckley & Charles, 2006). Whether fresh or frozen, your milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs, and you can count on your milk to support your baby in all areas of growth and development.

Here is a schedule many working mothers recommend for using frozen milk. With this system, your baby gets more fresh milk and therefore the best possible nutrition and immune factors to protect him from illness:

Pump on Monday; give this milk to your babysitter to use on Tuesday.
Pump on Tuesday; use this milk on Wednesday and so on until Friday.
Pump on Friday, label with the date, and freeze this milk; put it in the back of the freezer.
Use the oldest milk in the freezer for Monday.
Use your freezer stash only when you have an unusual need for extra milk, for example, when your baby is going through a growth spurt or you accidentally spill all of your freshly-pumped milk.
This system prevents the frozen milk from getting too old and needing to be thrown out. Another option would be to refrigerate Friday’s milk over the weekend and let your babysitter use it on Monday. This practice would preserve more of the antibodies in Friday’s milk but would not use up your frozen milk before it goes out of date.


What if my baby’s caregiver says my baby needs more milk?

With bottle-feeding, there can be a tendency for the person feeding to encourage the baby to finish the bottle. Milk flows easily from a bottle nipple, even when the baby is not actively sucking, and the faster flow can cause a baby to continue feeding after he is full. Caregivers may believe that a baby needs more milk than he actually does, and many childcare workers are accustomed to the larger amounts of formula they feed many babies. Make sure that your caregiver has the correct information about how much breastmilk a baby needs and understands the difference between bottle-feeding breastmilk and formula.

You can offer some tips to your baby’s caregiver on how to bottle feed in a way that supports breastfeeding:
Use a slow-flow soft bottle nipple that has a wide base and a shorter, round nipple (not the flatter, orthodontic kind).
Start by resting the tip of the nipple on the baby's upper lip and allow him to take it into his mouth himself, as if he were nursing.
Keep the bottle only slightly tilted, with the baby in a more upright position, so he has to work to get the milk out. If you hold the bottle straight down, the milk will come out too fast, and he may feel overwhelmed by the flow (Kassing, 2002).
lini1008
by on Sep. 13, 2012 at 10:41 PM
bump


gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Sep. 13, 2012 at 11:47 PM

Maggie really covered it.

One pump for every three hours away from baby should be fine.

mom2boyz8811
by on Sep. 14, 2012 at 5:34 AM
2 moms liked this
I think these ladies have covered it well. One thing that has helped me has been to drink lots of water while at work. I tend to get busy and forget so I have to make a conscious effort. I pump both sides when I first get up and then twice at work. I freeze my Friday milk. I pump first thing on the weekends as well and use that milk for Monday. I rarely use my freezer stash but it gives me piece mind to have it for emergencies. My mom is my baby sitter too. Aren't moms great?
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lucaslexie
by Hollie on Sep. 14, 2012 at 7:06 AM
1 mom liked this

I feed my dd around 4:30 5:30, then I pump around 6 00 or 6:30 (just for extra stash and to keep supply up).  Then I pump every 3 hours after that.  Usually 9,12 and 3.  Then my babysitter holds off feeding her if she can so either I feed her at the sitter or I feed her as soon as i get home.  At home we use NO bottles.  I nurse on demand when we are together just to keep my supply up.  My fear is my milk drying up.  Good luck :)

JeniF
by on Sep. 14, 2012 at 7:56 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting lucaslexie:

I feed my dd around 4:30 5:30, then I pump around 6 00 or 6:30 (just for extra stash and to keep supply up).  Then I pump every 3 hours after that.  Usually 9,12 and 3.  Then my babysitter holds off feeding her if she can so either I feed her at the sitter or I feed her as soon as i get home.  At home we use NO bottles.  I nurse on demand when we are together just to keep my supply up.  My fear is my milk drying up.  Good luck :)

YES! to both of these...when I first started picking DS up at day care, I couldn't figure out why he didn't want to nurse, the babysitter was tanking him up 'for the ride home'!  EEK!  Once I had her hold him off, I'd nurse him in the car in the parking lot before the ride home...MUCH better!  :-)

tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Sep. 14, 2012 at 9:14 AM
1 mom liked this

Maggie gave what I was gonna say.

I found pumping once a day even days off kept my pump response good, it wa a necessary thing for me

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