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Did you worry about your baby suffocating when you first started nursing?

Posted by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 3:52 PM
  • 23 Replies

Mom Suffocates Baby While Breastfeeding, But It Could Have Been Prevented

Posted by Nicole Fabian-Weber on November 8, 2012 

breastfeeding
Not the baby
It's a mother's nightmare come true. A 1-month-old baby boy recently died via suffocation while his mother was breastfeeding him. The 32-year-old new mom had reportedly gone out for a night of drinking, and when she returned to nurse her baby, she fell asleep while doing so. The next morning when she woke up, she saw that her baby's lips were blue (I really don't want to go into further detail of the state of the baby, as it's too disturbing), and she realized her brand new baby had passed away.

Yes, I know what you're thinking.

You shouldn't be going out for a night of drinking when you're breastfeeding, right? I agree. Nonetheless, this is extremely sad.

It's hard to think of anything more horrifying and disturbing -- waking up next to your child who passed away in the middle of the night. I certainly don't want to "lecture" a mom who's going through something awful, or act like I'm the world's greatest mother, but I will say, probably not the best idea to go out imbibing all night -- if this is true -- when you're breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding, as anyone who's tried knows, is hard. Really hard. It's so much more than, "Oh, I'm just going to pop this baby on my boob and feed it." Not only does it hurt (a lot) at first, you have to give up things. And "nights of drinking" are among those things. If you really, really can't do that -- honestly? Switch to formula. At that point, it's what's best. And, please, don't co-sleep if you're wasted.

My heart truly breaks for this poor woman. It's a tragedy in every sense. But the saddest part of all is that this could have been prevented. What a shame.

Did you worry about your baby suffocating when you first started nursing?

by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 3:52 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Nov. 8, 2012 at 4:03 PM
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I'm not completely convinced the suffocation happened *while* breastfeeding. If the mother was drunk, she could have just rolled over on the baby at any point. I'm not sure breastfeeding should have been dragged into this story.

I've never worried about suffocating my baby while breastfeeding. But if I completely drunk, I'd worry about suffocating a baby sleeping next to me.
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mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Nov. 8, 2012 at 4:06 PM
4 moms liked this
Breastfeeding moms CAN drink and breastfeed, with reasonable caution. I'm bothered by the insinuation that formula is the solution. And any responsible cosleeping (bed sharing) mother will tell you that being under the influence of any drug or alcohol is a huge no-no.
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gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Nov. 8, 2012 at 4:25 PM
1 mom liked this

This was not a breastfeeding problem. This was a drunk mom problem. Co-sleeping while drunk is as bad as driving while intoxicated.

I have indeed been there with suffocation. At six days old, my son stopped breathing while I was trying to nurse him. Blue lips. Pale skin. Not breathing. My husband administered CPR while I called 911.

We found he stopped breathing because I had a letdown that could douse a forest fire, and the milk hit just the right spot to make him stop breathing. It's the same principle as when you choke and cough because something went "down the wrong pipe." It's the vagus nerve. 

I had been so convinced that my attempt to keep him on the breast by holding his head firmly in the football hold was what made him stop breathing. But an excellent lactation consultant actually demonstrated to me that it didn't work that way; his nose was designed to handle the position I had him in. I'd have had to be lying on top of him. 

And that might indeed be the case for the woman in the above article. And sorry, but my heart doesn't break for this mom. It breaks for the rest of the family, but mom made an irresponsible decision. If she had hit a car and killed an adult, people would be calling for her blood.

aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Nov. 8, 2012 at 4:49 PM
1 mom liked this
I agree with everything said above!
This wasn't a breastfeeding issue. It was a drunk mom issue. Breastfeeding moms CAN enjoy a few drinks and continue breastfeeding as long as they follow the sober to drive, sober to nurse rule.
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crheinheimer
by Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 7:26 PM
I don't drink while breastfeeding but while nursing a newborn I do worry about suffocation. I have very large breasts and have to hold part of my boob down around the nose until the baby gets old enough to move his/head on their own.
cassdw
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 7:43 PM

That's why I think you should always pump, along with breastfeeding.  I'm a worrier by nature...I have a freezer full of pumped milk, and I constantly rotate and throw it out, but I have a "stash" like other people have formula stashes (which I also have, but hope to never have to use).

She shouldn't have had the baby in the bed with her after drinking, especially with a one month old, you're not getting enough sleep as it is, add a little alcohol and that's an accident waiting to happen.  So sad.  She could have given him a bottle of pumped milk and just pumped the alcohol filled milk and dumped it (pump and dump).  I feel really bad for her and her family and would not want to judge.  We've probably all made some bad choices that we're glad didn't end a different way.  So sad, but I do agree, you can't blame BREASTFEEDING...wth??  Now they're going to try to make breastfeeding seem dangerous? 

Char07
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 8:00 PM
2 moms liked this
Ever looked into donating the milk before it comes time to throw it away?

Quoting cassdw:

That's why I think you should always pump, along with breastfeeding.  I'm a worrier by nature...I have a freezer full of pumped milk, and I constantly rotate and throw it out, but I have a "stash" like other people have formula stashes (which I also have, but hope to never have to use).


She shouldn't have had the baby in the bed with her after drinking, especially with a one month old, you're not getting enough sleep as it is, add a little alcohol and that's an accident waiting to happen.  So sad.  She could have given him a bottle of pumped milk and just pumped the alcohol filled milk and dumped it (pump and dump).  I feel really bad for her and her family and would not want to judge.  We've probably all made some bad choices that we're glad didn't end a different way.  So sad, but I do agree, you can't blame BREASTFEEDING...wth??  Now they're going to try to make breastfeeding seem dangerous? 

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mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Nov. 8, 2012 at 8:24 PM
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Babies noses are designed by nature to nurse even while smooshed at the breast. That's why their noses are so flat and nostrils flared. Unless their head is being held forcibly into the breast, they will choose breathing over nursing and unlatch if its more breast than they can handle.
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gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Nov. 8, 2012 at 9:34 PM
1 mom liked this

Wouldn't be the first time. Nor the last.

Quoting cassdw:

Now they're going to try to make breastfeeding seem dangerous? 


catholicmamamia
by on Nov. 9, 2012 at 12:20 AM

Poor baby.. sounds like the baby might have passed from suffocation due to overlying.


         

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