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my daughter Abigail is a month old and I have been struggling to get her to nurse exclusively. She will nurse on both breasts for about 30 min to an hour and still want 1-4 ounces on top of that. How can I get her to nurse exclusively and be satified to where I am not having to pump after her nursing to give her a bottle? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Me and her have already gotten her improper latch corrected (she corrected it her self I am surprized).

by on Nov. 18, 2012 at 10:04 PM
Replies (31-39):
aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Nov. 19, 2012 at 2:48 PM
I think you might need to start block feeding to reduce your massive oversupply. Start with one side for a 4 hour block, then switch to the other side for the next 4 hours, and so on. When the unused side gets engorged hand express JUST ENOUGH for relief. What breast pads did you use? I leaked a ton too. I kept trying different ones until I found what worked for me. Pumping is really just making it worse. The reclined nursing suggested earlier will help to reduce the gassiness because it reduces the force of the flow of milk and also decreases the amount of air taken in.
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aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Nov. 19, 2012 at 2:50 PM
Oh, and the doctor was wrong about the amount that she should be taking in a bottle. Doctors are not taught about breastfeeding in medical school. Most of what they usually know about infant feeding comes from formula companies.
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MayFlowerMomma
by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 2:54 PM

Good luck. Hope everything works out for you

mamabens
by Miranda on Nov. 19, 2012 at 4:56 PM
1 mom liked this

Sorry doc is wrong, he's probably thinking of a formula fed baby, they do that . Docs know very little about lactation. YOu can pump just enough to be comfy but  pumping just because you leak is honestly only making it worse. You're going to end up with mastitis if you keep up pumping like that. Not trying to be mean, just honest.

Quoting TheMommaJessie:

accordding 2 doc she is suppose 2 be having 3-4 ounces at a feeding and i have 2 do something my breast leak all the time if i dont pump an hour after her feedings

Quoting mamabens:

pumping & bottlefeeding seems to be making things worse for you. Ditch the pump, recline feed(since it's obvious you have an oversupply) . Pumping is only making the overabundance of milk  worse. Remember if you DO give a bottle, you shouldnt give it & baby needs no more than 3 oz per bottle ever.



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TheMommaJessie
by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 9:12 PM

i have been told by a lactation person and researched it all says the same thing plus the breast feeding guide i was given says that 2. i used several different kinds don't remember the names they were given 2 me.

Quoting aehanrahan:

Oh, and the doctor was wrong about the amount that she should be taking in a bottle. Doctors are not taught about breastfeeding in medical school. Most of what they usually know about infant feeding comes from formula companies.


jocelynred
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 10:56 AM

if there's no tounge tie and she is getting enough from the breast then my question is are you swaddling her to get her to sleep? if she falls asleep and wakes when you move her she may not be truly hungry. try the 5 "s"'s to get her to fall asleep before feeding her a bottle. suck, swaddle, side lying, sway, and shushing. usually a combination of these techniques will calm a crying baby enough to get them to sleep if they are tired and not hungry. once you get a good swaddle you may find that she'll take the paci. if it's been an hour, instead of a bottle offer the breast. if she refuses the breast she's likely not hungry but tired.

gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Nov. 20, 2012 at 11:52 AM

Was the Lactation COnsulktant IBCLC? If not, she was likely as qualified as an auto mechanic to advise you. Awful but it's too often true.

And look at who published the breastfeeding guide. If it was a formula company (and the freebies typically are from formula companies) then burn it because they have NO interest in telling you correct info about breastfeeding.It costs them oney if you're successful at breastfeeding! And if the LC gave you a breastfeeding guide from a formula company, yep, she's in the auto mechanic category.

Baby needs no more than three ounces in a bottle. Really. NO MORE. Baby's daily need is 24-30 ounces per day.

Quoting TheMommaJessie:

i have been told by a lactation person and researched it all says the same thing plus the breast feeding guide i was given says that 2. i used several different kinds don't remember the names they were given 2 me.

Quoting aehanrahan:

Oh, and the doctor was wrong about the amount that she should be taking in a bottle. Doctors are not taught about breastfeeding in medical school. Most of what they usually know about infant feeding comes from formula companies.



maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Nov. 20, 2012 at 1:48 PM


Quoting TheMommaJessie:

i have been told by a lactation person and researched it all says the same thing plus the breast feeding guide i was given says that 2. i used several different kinds don't remember the names they were given 2 me.

Quoting aehanrahan:

Oh, and the doctor was wrong about the amount that she should be taking in a bottle. Doctors are not taught about breastfeeding in medical school. Most of what they usually know about infant feeding comes from formula companies.


Actually 3-4 ounces per feeding is correct if baby is only feeding every 3-4 hours. However, since you are working to transition baby back to the breast, more frequent smaller feedins will be better. Baby needs to work harder at the breast to get the same amount from the bottle, so baby may get frustrated when she can't easily get 3-4 ounces, and seem unsatisfied at the breast. More frequent feeding is usually key in getting baby 100% on the breast and eliminating "top offs" with the bottle. Try to get baby to the breast every 1.5 to 2 hours, at least to begin with, when you are wanting to eliminate bottles and pumping.

http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/milkcalc/

How much milk do babies need?

Many mothers wonder how much expressed breastmilk they need to have available if they are away from baby.

In exclusively breastfed babies, milk intake increases quickly during the first few weeks of life, then stays about the same between one and six months (though it likely increases short term during growth spurts). Current breastfeeding research does not indicate that breastmilk intake changes with baby’s age or weight between one and six months. After six months, breastmilk intake will continue at this same level until — sometime after six months, depending in baby’s intake from other foods — baby’s milk intake begins to decrease gradually (see below).

The research tells us that exclusively breastfed babies take in an average of 25 oz (750 mL) per day between the ages of 1 month and 6 months. Different babies take in different amounts of milk; a typical range of milk intakes is 19-30 oz per day (570-900 mL per day).

We can use this information to estimate the average amount of milk baby will need at a feeding:

  • Estimate the number of times that baby nurses per day (24 hours).
  • Then divide 25 oz by the number of nursings.
  • This gives you a “ballpark” figure for the amount of expressed milk your exclusively breastfed baby will need at one feeding.

Example: If baby usually nurses around 8 times per day, you can guess that baby might need around 3 ounces per feeding when mom is away. (25/8=3.1).

TheMommaJessie
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 3:26 PM

she will not swaddle she will scream and cry when trying 2 swaddle her.  she loves her paci. she has refused the breast all day today been having to bottle feed, she is wanting to sleep all the time too. she was up until 1am before going to sleep last night & wanted fed every hour from 7pm-1am. i think im just going to pump she nursed and nursed so much that my nips are raw now and i had to give bottles around 10pm because of it.

Quoting jocelynred:

if there's no tounge tie and she is getting enough from the breast then my question is are you swaddling her to get her to sleep? if she falls asleep and wakes when you move her she may not be truly hungry. try the 5 "s"'s to get her to fall asleep before feeding her a bottle. suck, swaddle, side lying, sway, and shushing. usually a combination of these techniques will calm a crying baby enough to get them to sleep if they are tired and not hungry. once you get a good swaddle you may find that she'll take the paci. if it's been an hour, instead of a bottle offer the breast. if she refuses the breast she's likely not hungry but tired.


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