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Theoretical Question--Swapping nursing/Wet Nursing/Tandemly

Posted by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 2:35 AM
  • 3 Replies

Okay, so we know that the major health institutions list the options for feeding young babies as:

1) Mother's milk nursed from the breast

2) Mom's milk pumped and given in a alternative manner

3) Donated human milk

4) Articial infant formula

Now, where would swapping nursing or wet nursing go? First of all swapping nursing baby is still getting moms own BM from her breast, while wet nursing would employ one woman long term, so I consider them two separate things. I'm thinking that the occasional nursing by another mom would be around number 3 and considered donated milk. On the other hand, if it's a regular thing I would think that mom would start creating antibodies for that baby, but it still wouldn't be the specifically tailored milk of mom, so it would actually bump up to number 2 and bump EPing down to number 3 (since with nursing baby is getting things like antibodies he doesn't get with pumped milk). Wet nursing I'd put at number 1.5 (can't quite say number one, but want to go close--;) ) I feel that wet nursing would have the same benefits because the woman's body would start to create tailored antibodies as well as making milk specific for the child.

Now onto my next question. How would these rankings and the benefits of the milk (still better than formula) sit if the woman wet nursing or temporarily nursing has a child significantly older or younger? Milk changes composition over time. Therefore where would the milk received from these two feeding option in this situation rank?

by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 2:35 AM
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Replies (1-3):
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Jan. 3, 2013 at 2:43 AM


Quoting MonicaV1982:

Okay, so we know that the major health institutions list the options for feeding young babies as:

1) Mother's milk nursed from the breast

2) Mom's milk pumped and given in a alternative manner

3) Donated human milk

4) Articial infant formula

Now, where would swapping nursing or wet nursing go?

Donated.

First of all swapping nursing baby is still getting moms own BM from her breast, while wet nursing would employ one woman long term, so I consider them two separate things. I'm thinking that the occasional nursing by another mom would be around number 3 and considered donated milk.

Yep, and it really remains there.

On the other hand, if it's a regular thing I would think that mom would start creating antibodies for that baby, but it still wouldn't be the specifically tailored milk of mom, so it would actually bump up to number 2 and bump EPing down to number 3 (since with nursing baby is getting things like antibodies he doesn't get with pumped milk). Wet nursing I'd put at number 1.5 (can't quite say number one, but want to go close--;) ) I feel that wet nursing would have the same benefits because the woman's body would start to create tailored antibodies as well as making milk specific for the child.

Now onto my next question. How would these rankings and the benefits of the milk (still better than formula) sit if the woman wet nursing or temporarily nursing has a child significantly older or younger? Milk changes composition over time. Therefore where would the milk received from these two feeding option in this situation rank?

Donated. Always. It's still another woman's milk no matter what the delivery method. The DNA is different.


MonicaV1982
by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 3:12 AM

I would posit that it's more than that, especially for longer term situations (wet nurses and adoptive moms for instance) The chemical responses that the breasts get and then create antibodies to say disease is not present in pumped milk.


Quoting gdiamante:


Quoting MonicaV1982:

Okay, so we know that the major health institutions list the options for feeding young babies as:

1) Mother's milk nursed from the breast

2) Mom's milk pumped and given in a alternative manner

3) Donated human milk

4) Articial infant formula

Now, where would swapping nursing or wet nursing go?

Donated.

First of all swapping nursing baby is still getting moms own BM from her breast, while wet nursing would employ one woman long term, so I consider them two separate things. I'm thinking that the occasional nursing by another mom would be around number 3 and considered donated milk.

Yep, and it really remains there.

On the other hand, if it's a regular thing I would think that mom would start creating antibodies for that baby, but it still wouldn't be the specifically tailored milk of mom, so it would actually bump up to number 2 and bump EPing down to number 3 (since with nursing baby is getting things like antibodies he doesn't get with pumped milk). Wet nursing I'd put at number 1.5 (can't quite say number one, but want to go close--;) ) I feel that wet nursing would have the same benefits because the woman's body would start to create tailored antibodies as well as making milk specific for the child.

Now onto my next question. How would these rankings and the benefits of the milk (still better than formula) sit if the woman wet nursing or temporarily nursing has a child significantly older or younger? Milk changes composition over time. Therefore where would the milk received from these two feeding option in this situation rank?

Donated. Always. It's still another woman's milk no matter what the delivery method. The DNA is different.



luna321
by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:02 AM

I agree that in most causes it would be donated milk so 3- unless its long term, especially adoptive moms, then it would be right up there close to 1.

Quoting MonicaV1982:

I would posit that it's more than that, especially for longer term situations (wet nurses and adoptive moms for instance) The chemical responses that the breasts get and then create antibodies to say disease is not present in pumped milk.


Quoting gdiamante:


Quoting MonicaV1982:

Okay, so we know that the major health institutions list the options for feeding young babies as:

1) Mother's milk nursed from the breast

2) Mom's milk pumped and given in a alternative manner

3) Donated human milk

4) Articial infant formula

Now, where would swapping nursing or wet nursing go?

Donated.

First of all swapping nursing baby is still getting moms own BM from her breast, while wet nursing would employ one woman long term, so I consider them two separate things. I'm thinking that the occasional nursing by another mom would be around number 3 and considered donated milk.

Yep, and it really remains there.

On the other hand, if it's a regular thing I would think that mom would start creating antibodies for that baby, but it still wouldn't be the specifically tailored milk of mom, so it would actually bump up to number 2 and bump EPing down to number 3 (since with nursing baby is getting things like antibodies he doesn't get with pumped milk). Wet nursing I'd put at number 1.5 (can't quite say number one, but want to go close--;) ) I feel that wet nursing would have the same benefits because the woman's body would start to create tailored antibodies as well as making milk specific for the child.

Now onto my next question. How would these rankings and the benefits of the milk (still better than formula) sit if the woman wet nursing or temporarily nursing has a child significantly older or younger? Milk changes composition over time. Therefore where would the milk received from these two feeding option in this situation rank?

Donated. Always. It's still another woman's milk no matter what the delivery method. The DNA is different.




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