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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

PUMP OR NOT TO PUMP

Posted by on Jan. 11, 2013 at 11:56 AM
  • 61 Replies

So we started solids today, and should I pump when hed normaill eat or will my boobs adjust to the new feeding schedule, I don't want to stop breast feeding at all and am conserned with milk production, any advice would be amazing, thanks


by on Jan. 11, 2013 at 11:56 AM
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mamabens
by Miranda on Jan. 11, 2013 at 12:01 PM
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You should always breastfeed BEFORE any solids. Solids before 12 months of age should never replace a feeding. So there would be no need to pump.

 BabyFruit Ticker


SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on Jan. 11, 2013 at 12:13 PM

Like PP said, nurse before solids... if you're getting engorged because of starting solids, then youre giving entirly too much. 

Mama_Of_Two2012
by on Jan. 11, 2013 at 1:09 PM
When i fed my daughter solids it replaced a meal. What is the point if it isnt to replace a bf session. I started solids because wanted to nurse WAY to often
maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Jan. 11, 2013 at 1:12 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Mama_Of_Two2012:

When i fed my daughter solids it replaced a meal. What is the point if it isnt to replace a bf session. I started solids because wanted to nurse WAY to often

Well, solids are not supposed to replace a breastfeeding until around 12 months old.

From http://kellymom.com/nutrition/starting-solids/solids-how/

Should solids replace breastmilk?

No. Solids during the first year are only meant to complement breastmilk, not take precedence over it or replace any breastfeedings. It is more of a way to add textures to the baby’s diet, to allow the baby new experiences, and to help her develop hand/eye coordination through finger feeding. Your baby should still be allowed to nurse on demand, as your milk should be her primary source of nutrition until closer to the end of the first year. Continuing to allow on-demand feedings also better ensures your milk supply.

Complementary Feeding

How often and how much?

Introduce your baby gradually to solid foods. Once she accepts them (it might take some time), continue breastfeeding as often as before and add solids as your baby’s appetite increases. A few bites once a day is enough in the beginning, but gradually increase. Following are some general guidelines – if baby starts solids later than six months, then proceed in a similar manner, at baby’s pace.

 SolidsLiquids
0 – 4 monthsBreastmilk onlyBreastmilk only
4 – 6 months

Breastmilk only

See also: What if my 4-5 month old seems developmentally ready for solids?

Continue nursing on cue.

When your 4 – 6 month old baby is learning to use a cup, giving him a few sips of expressed breastmilk or water (no more than 2 ounces per 24 hours) a couple of times a day is fine and fun.

6 – 7 monthsOffer solids once a day, at most. Many start out offering solids every few days or even less often.

Continue nursing on cue. Solid foods should not replace nursing sessions unless you’re actively weaning.

Limit water to SIPS from a cup with meals.

Juice is not necessary for baby’s nutrition. If you offer juice, limit to sips from a cup with meals and introduce it gradually just like any other new food. It’s best to dilute juice with water and limit total juice intake to no more than 3-4 ounces a day.

7 – 9 monthsWatch baby’s cues – this is particularly easy if baby nurses beforehand and most/all of the solids are offered to baby to self-feed. Increase solids gradually if baby is interested, with a maximum of 2 meals per day.
9 – 12 monthsWatch baby’s cues – this is particularly easy if baby nurses beforehand and most/all of the solids are offered to baby to self-feed. Increase solids gradually if baby is interested. Aim for baby getting no more than 25% of her calories from solids by the age of 12 months (some babies eat less than this at 12 months and that’s also normal).

If your baby is younger than a year (and you are not weaning), make sure that you always nurse before offering solids. Babies who start solids early, and babies who eat a lot of solids tend to wean earlier.

It often works well to offer the solids about an hour after you nurse. If nursing has come before the solids you can continue feeding your baby the solids until she shows signs of fullness; i.e. turning her head, closing her mouth, batting at the spoon, wanting down, spitting the food out, etc. (trying to feed past this point is overfeeding). Most babies will balance their milk intake with their solid food intake well if you feed in this way.

From https://breastfeedingusa.org/content/article/good-foods-babies

“Wow, I am excited to start! But I was wondering, if I start on other foods, won't he nurse less often? I don't want to lose my milk, and I am not ready to stop nursing.”

Your milk remains the most important part of your baby's diet until he is about a year old. Always nurse him before offering other foods and afterwards as well if he is interested. Nursing before offering solids will both ensure that baby gets enough breastmilk and maintain your milk production.

Babies need only their mother’s milk for about the first six months. Your baby will continue to receive the same nutrition and protection from your milk as long as you continue to nurse.

The continuing protection from illness is important for your baby, because when babies become more mobile, they are toddling around and picking up all kinds of germs, some of which go straight into their mouths.

lorsmommy08
by on Jan. 11, 2013 at 1:14 PM

Before a year, solids are only for practice mostly. Maggiesmom gave really good info on why.

Quoting Mama_Of_Two2012:

When i fed my daughter solids it replaced a meal. What is the point if it isnt to replace a bf session. I started solids because wanted to nurse WAY to often



shortyali
by Alicia on Jan. 11, 2013 at 1:30 PM
No need to pump since you nurse first then give solids. Their bodies aren't equipped yet to get all of the nutrients from solids.
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Mama_Of_Two2012
by on Jan. 11, 2013 at 2:15 PM
So if solids aren't saposed to take over a feeding, then how do I get my son to eat less often. he went from 2+ hr between feeds to every hour or 1.5 hour.....I can't do that. I have an older child to tend to and a house to also tend to and can't be sitting on the couch all day long like a patato, even if I didn't have a house or another child I can't sit on the couch all day, I am just not capable of doing that....
mamabens
by Miranda on Jan. 11, 2013 at 2:27 PM

6 months is a growth spurt, it will slow down. Also invest in a sling/carrier. It saved my life. When my son was born I had a 3 yr old & a 5 yr old, I know it's tough.  Some babies eat/comfort nurse a lot(I had one) & that's what makes the sling so nice. I could latch him on & go about my day & even chase my 3 yr old!

Quoting Mama_Of_Two2012:

So if solids aren't saposed to take over a feeding, then how do I get my son to eat less often. he went from 2+ hr between feeds to every hour or 1.5 hour.....I can't do that. I have an older child to tend to and a house to also tend to and can't be sitting on the couch all day long like a patato, even if I didn't have a house or another child I can't sit on the couch all day, I am just not capable of doing that....


 BabyFruit Ticker


shortyali
by Alicia on Jan. 11, 2013 at 2:28 PM
Get a wrap or a sling. Put baby in it and you can nurse on the go. I have 3 kids under the age of 5 and my moby had been my lifesaver.
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K8wizzo
by Kate on Jan. 11, 2013 at 2:40 PM

Put baby in a sling and nurse while you go about your day.  You can give solids immediately after nursing, but really that won't decrease the frequency of his nursing.  He may be going through a growth spurt or teething.

Quoting Mama_Of_Two2012:

So if solids aren't saposed to take over a feeding, then how do I get my son to eat less often. he went from 2+ hr between feeds to every hour or 1.5 hour.....I can't do that. I have an older child to tend to and a house to also tend to and can't be sitting on the couch all day long like a patato, even if I didn't have a house or another child I can't sit on the couch all day, I am just not capable of doing that....


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