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Iron drops

Posted by on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:26 PM
  • 12 Replies

So my ped is still trying to push the iron drops down my throat, at my daughters 4 month checkup he said all breastfed babies need iron drops at 4 months and then last week at her 6 month checkup he was upset because i hadnt given them to her because of a few things when she was first born i took an iron supplement she got constipated so i stopped takin them and she is also eating rice cereal and vegitables and fruits he wont do an iron test until shes 12 months old but is telling me my lactation consultant is wrong by saying not all breastfed babies need the iron so my question is how do i approach him? ive tried ex[plaining and he interupts me talks over me its very hard to keep calm when breastfeeding is so important and hes making me feel bad for choosing it, he makes me feel like im lacking for her bc i bfeed saying she doesnt weigh enough also... I dont know what to do

by on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:26 PM
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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:32 PM

First, have you considered switching doctors? Do you want to continue with a doctor who is interrupting you and talking over you?

Did this doctor recommend iron fortified rice cereal? If so, know that the AAP is suggesting NO iron fortified rice cereal, check out this article:

Rice Cereal Can Wait, Let Them Eat Meat First: AAP committee has changes in mind http://community.thenest.com/cs/ks/forums/thread/57384155.aspx?MsdVisit=1

Here's some research based info for you on iron supplements:

http://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/iron/

Which babies are more at risk for iron-deficiency anemia?

  • Babies who were born prematurely, since babies get the majority of their iron stores from their mother during the last trimester of pregnancy.
  • In addition, there is evidence that babies whose birth weights are less than 3000 grams – about 6.5 pounds – (whether term or premature) tend to have reduced iron stores at birth and appear to need additional iron earlier.
  • Babies born to mothers with poorly controlled diabetes.
  • Theoretically, babies born to mothers who were anemic during pregnancy could have lower iron stores, however medical studies donot show this to be a problem. Babies born to mothers who are anemic during pregnancy are no more likely to be iron deficient than those born to mothers who are not anemic during pregnancy.
  • Babies who are fed cow’s milk (instead of breastmilk or iron-fortified formula) during the first year of life.

Healthy, full-term infants who are breastfed exclusively for periods of 6-9 months have been shown to maintain normal hemoglobin values and normal iron stores. In one of these studies, done by Pisacane in 1995, the researchers concluded that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 7 months (and were not give iron supplements or iron-fortified cereals) had significantly higher hemoglobin levels at one year than breastfed babies who received solid foods earlier than seven months. The researchers found no cases of anemia within the first year in babies breastfed exclusively for seven months and concluded that breastfeeding exclusively for seven months reduces the risk of anemia.

The original recommendations for iron-fortified foods were based on a formula-fed baby’s need for them and the fact that breastmilk contains less iron than formula (doctors didn’t know then that the iron in breastmilk is absorbed much better). Also, a few babies do have lower iron stores and will need extra iron at some point in addition to what they are getting from solids (though this can often be remedied by making sure that solids are high in iron and vitamin C – see below).

If mom or doctor is concerned about a baby’s iron levels, have the doctor to do a blood test for hemoglobin.

Some babies are exclusively breastfed for a year (and occasionally up to two years) with no problems at all. In addition, some doctors recommend that babies with a high risk for allergies be exclusively breastfed for a year.

Why not use iron supplements as a protective measure for every baby?

The iron in breastmilk is bound to proteins which make it available to the baby only, thus preventing potentially harmful bacteria (likeE.coli, Salmonella, Clostridium, Bacteroides, Escherichia, Staphylococcus) from using it. These two specialized proteins in breastmilk (lactoferrin and transferrin) pick up and bind iron from baby’s intestinal tract. By binding this iron, they

  1. stop harmful bacteria from multiplying by depriving them of the iron they need to live and grow, and
  2. ensure that baby (not the bacteria) gets the available iron.

The introduction of iron supplements and iron-fortified foods, particularly during the first six months, reduces the efficiency of baby’s iron absorption. As long as your baby is exclusively breastfed (and receiving no iron supplements or iron-fortified foods), the specialized proteins in breastmilk ensure that baby gets the available iron (instead of “bad” bacteria and such). Iron supplements and iron in other foods is available on a first come, first served basis, and there is a regular “free-for-all” in the baby’s gut over it. The “bad” bacteria thrive on the free iron in the gut. In addition, iron supplements can overwhelm the iron-binding abilities of the proteins in breastmilk, thus making some of the iron from breastmilk (which was previously available to baby only) available to bacteria, also. The result: baby tends to get a lower percentage of the available iron.

Supplemental iron (particularly when administered in solution or as a separate supplement rather than incorporated into a meal) can interfere with zinc absorption. In addition, iron supplements and iron-fortified foods can sometimes cause digestive upsets in babies.

A recent study (Dewey 2002) found that routine iron supplementation of breastfed babies with normal hemoglobin levels may present risks to the infant, including slower growth (length and head circumference) and increased risk of diarrhea.

A recent review article on iron (Griffin and Abrams, 2001) indicates that if your baby is basically healthy, iron deficiency in the absence of anemia should not have developmental consequences.


MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:37 PM
Don't let him know you aren't giving the drops. Better yet, get a new pedi. The fact that he talks over you and gives incorrect information as well could be dangerous for your baby. The iron drops will interfere with the absorption of the iron in your milk. Go to kellymom.com and read the relevant articles. Print them and take them with you if you think it would help. Also, be sure you nurse first before solids until one year of age. Solids are not fully absorbed until then, and are for fun only.
MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:39 PM
Do you have her weight history from birth?
mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:43 PM
1 mom liked this
Your relationship with the pediatrician lasts for 18 years. It is really important that you feel like you can talk to your doctor honestly, and be treated with respect, even while disagreeing. Ask the LC or some LLL moms for the names of other doctors who know what they are talking about.
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SadieJames
by on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:46 PM

I would ditch this pedi.  He doesn't respect you as the mom, which is a huge slap in the face IMO.

off topic - what's your first name? I'm sfrazer too! (no I though).  I'm Sarah

PolishMamma2
by Marta on Jan. 13, 2013 at 11:47 PM
1 mom liked this

 Ok your Dr should never make you feel like your anything less then a good mom. Dont forget Just because they have the title DR. MDD MD MS or whatever dosnt meen they can say what they want or make you feel down in anyway. Remember that if it wasnt for you & the other patients they wouldnt have a practice, so technecaly they work for you. Your the mother so do what you feel is best for your baby...

Sfrazier
by Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 12:10 AM

Yes i have a book I write everything down in she was 7lbs 1 oz at birth  month- 8lbs 2 months- 10.8 lbs 4 months 12.3lbs and 6months 13lbs shes 5th percentile but 60th on her height my mom told me they used to say double weight at 6 months and triple by a year is this still and average to go by?

Quoting MusherMaggie:

Do you have her weight history from birth?


Sfrazier
by Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 12:12 AM

Im thinking of switching but also taking so literature in to him for other moms sakes my first name is Shannon thats funny our names are so close

Quoting SadieJames:

I would ditch this pedi.  He doesn't respect you as the mom, which is a huge slap in the face IMO.

off topic - what's your first name? I'm sfrazer too! (no I though).  I'm Sarah


SadieJames
by on Jan. 14, 2013 at 12:14 AM
1 mom liked this

I would take in info and talk to him about it.  If he's still adamant he's right I would switch and spread the word via Facebook and medical review websites that he doesn't follow AAP guidelines and disrespects moms.

it is : )

Quoting Sfrazier:

Im thinking of switching but also taking so literature in to him for other moms sakes my first name is Shannon thats funny our names are so close

Quoting SadieJames:

I would ditch this pedi.  He doesn't respect you as the mom, which is a huge slap in the face IMO.

off topic - what's your first name? I'm sfrazer too! (no I though).  I'm Sarah



Sfrazier
by Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 12:15 AM

I just feel weird because im a first time mom and i do want whats best for my daughter and if she needs he iron i would give it to her but with the things that ive read giving it uneeded is also very bad for her i just dont see why he cant check her iron i dont want him to make other moms feel this way what if they dont have the support like i do from a group like this and family

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