Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

How do you honestly feel about milk banks?

If you dont know about milk banks they are places that take donor milk and test it, treat it, package it, process it and then sell it to needy families.  Insurance covers the cost for some babies like those in NICUs.  They charge $3-8 an ounce generally.

by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 6:23 PM
Replies (31-40):
First_One_8_18
by Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:09 PM
I understand. That's why it's so important to communicate what you want out of the donor +recipient relationship. The donor works hard and it really takes a ton of time and effort for a full time donation schedule. The recipient mom is just trying to do what's best for their baby and often struggles with what you're describing. A lot of moms that do donation do one time donations and some moms just ask for donations because they can't nurse and don't want to pay for formula.
Have you tried finding a la leche league near you? They offer amazing support. Most hospitals have lactation consultants on staff and they often hold support groups, as well.


Quoting victoriangavin:

But not everyone does what you did or cares like that. If i had someone i trusted then it wouldn't bother me but i don't even have support for breastfeeding here, just my mom who is 4 hours away so i'm doing my best with what i can




Quoting First_One_8_18:

When i donated, i gave the moms a copy of my blood work medically clearing me of all communicable diseases that can be spread through fluids.


Eta, i also developed a long term friendship with both of my moms i donated to. I let them know up front that i wanted a working relationship. I kept logs of every medication i took, how much i pumped and when, and what foods i ate that might make them gassy or give then upset tummies. I spent a lot of time and love pumping for their babies to be able to have the same start as my own daughter.









Quoting victoriangavin:

This one supplies hospitals here, for the nicu. And personally I could never supply my child with milk from a stranger without knowing what's in it. The blood test you take to become a donor is to protect those babies and if I had to buy breastmilk I would put my childs safety above all else. Too many people that have disease don't know they have them and I couldn't risk my son getting anything











Quoting tabi_cat1023:


ALL milk banks sell it, they say not for profit but they all charge...






Quoting victoriangavin:

I'm getting set up to donate but the one I'm donating to doesn't sell it


















Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
PoodleMum
by Silver Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:19 PM
1 mom liked this

I'm torn :/  So many people in the NICU think of it as more acceptable than "fresh" milk, so it is keeping babies off formula.  But I don't like what pasteurization does to raw milk...  My preference is mama to mama donation!  Sadly, we need both until fresh breastmilk is normalized

carolyntx
by Bronze Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:19 PM
I'm more for milk share but I know there are infants in the nicu that may have restrictions that the strenuous processes of the milk banks might benefit them.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
victoriangavin
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:21 PM
I've wanted to but with my situation thanks to my son's father until i can get a new car i'm stuck with having my step mom take us to doctors appointments and she's only off one day a week. If i ever have another baby i'll be in a different situation and will have learned from this one... Until then i'm honestly lucky my step mom hasn't thrown all the milk that's in the freezer in the trash and she's on my butt about gettin rid of it. I produce about 360 extra oz a month and am doing my best to have it used


Quoting First_One_8_18:

I understand. That's why it's so important to communicate what you want out of the donor +recipient relationship. The donor works hard and it really takes a ton of time and effort for a full time donation schedule. The recipient mom is just trying to do what's best for their baby and often struggles with what you're describing. A lot of moms that do donation do one time donations and some moms just ask for donations because they can't nurse and don't want to pay for formula.

Have you tried finding a la leche league near you? They offer amazing support. Most hospitals have lactation consultants on staff and they often hold support groups, as well.




Quoting victoriangavin:

But not everyone does what you did or cares like that. If i had someone i trusted then it wouldn't bother me but i don't even have support for breastfeeding here, just my mom who is 4 hours away so i'm doing my best with what i can






Quoting First_One_8_18:

When i donated, i gave the moms a copy of my blood work medically clearing me of all communicable diseases that can be spread through fluids.



Eta, i also developed a long term friendship with both of my moms i donated to. I let them know up front that i wanted a working relationship. I kept logs of every medication i took, how much i pumped and when, and what foods i ate that might make them gassy or give then upset tummies. I spent a lot of time and love pumping for their babies to be able to have the same start as my own daughter.












Quoting victoriangavin:

This one supplies hospitals here, for the nicu. And personally I could never supply my child with milk from a stranger without knowing what's in it. The blood test you take to become a donor is to protect those babies and if I had to buy breastmilk I would put my childs safety above all else. Too many people that have disease don't know they have them and I couldn't risk my son getting anything














Quoting tabi_cat1023:


ALL milk banks sell it, they say not for profit but they all charge...







Quoting victoriangavin:

I'm getting set up to donate but the one I'm donating to doesn't sell it






















Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Denisethedaring
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 11:57 PM

I think it's a great idea but wow, I had no idea how pricey it was! 

LucyHourglass
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 1:00 AM

haha i better not tell wic that im using donor milk then.... everyone acts like its sharing needles or something. everyone gets tested when they are pregnant so that makes matters a lot easier. people wouldnt breastfeed their own babies if they had a disease. and definitely wouldnt offer to donate it i would think..

Quoting tabi_cat1023:


Sadly WIC here discourages milk sharing, they found out I was donating milk and their IBCLC came and told me how dangerous it was, how much I was risking, and said I was lucky I didnt have a WIC pump because she would demand it back.

Quoting Baby_Avas_Momma:

I just don't like that they charge people for it, especially where there are things like WIC for example that pass out cases of formula at the drop of a hat. Donor milk should be just as available as formula, in my opinion. ;)





____________________________________________________________________________________

Non-vaccinating, breastfeeding, babywearing, co-sleeping, cloth diapering, attachment parenting, anti-CIO,  crunchy momma of one happy little baby boy. :)

MisfitInTN
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 3:45 AM
That is really expensive. Id rather use local mothers
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
catholicmamamia
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 5:09 AM

Not a fan. 


              ♥♥ Join us in  
Crunchy Moms  -  make friends and share advice
             on breastfeeding, babywearing, bedsharing, and natural living! ♥

lizzieiguana
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 7:04 AM

Not quite sure what to write here, since I press a button and the whole page just goes south.

Any IBCLC who talks about how dangerous donating milk is - or donated milk - really needs to get checked out.

Donating milk is awesome - but treating it? with what? does it wind up killing all the properties?

I would far sooner nurse another's baby than I would donate - because my supply doesn't respond to a pump.

besides, nursing another's baby gives the healing properties of milk - and the donor's milk supply - a chance to work.

If you nurse your baby, then nurse them again say, 1/2 hour later, by the time you nurse them again, your body has made anti-bodies for whatever the baby might be harboring - a cold, flu, other illness. Stored milk can't do that (well, unless the cold and anti-bodies match up baby to milk - and that isn't likely to happen if it is heat-treated or stored improperly, or just plain older than the cold virus going around!)


number1mahmee
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 8:05 AM
I don't personally care for milk banks. Its great what their purpose is but they pasturize breast milk then sell it to babiesthat need it. My first son and I struggled with breastfeeding like something fierce! Eventually we needed donor milk as he was deathly allergic to all brands and all variations of formula. Our milk bank wanted to charge us 8$ an ounce for DONATED milk!!! For a sick bay who would otherwise be hospitalized without it.
Luckily with the.love and.compassion of 36 women who donates their milk to my bub he is perfectly healthy today. And now my second son is here and we have no issues I tandem nurse as well as pump to donate directly to other sick babies that need it. If moms cone together as a community to help out a child in need directly its better. Using connections like Eats On Feets or Human Milk For Human Babies providing for eachother out of love is the way to go. And no I have never been worries about drugs or disease... you can normally tell if a momma isn't doing well health wise, and when a mom takes the time to nor only feed her own bub, but to take the extra time to pump out of her day... their moral compass is usually in tune :)
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN