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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

i wish i could breastfeed

Posted by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:33 AM
  • 16 Replies
I wish I could breast feed exclusivley but instead I have been pumping since day 2 of my daughters birth. She is now 2 months old. I pump and supplement with formula because of not producing enough. I tried breastfeeding but she never really latched on. I've tried multiple lactation consultants and nothing but supplements to drink have really worked. If I had my way I would be exclusivley breastfeeding but things don't always work out. And trust my pumping every 2-3 hr. Sucks and is painful. For now because I want the best for my daughter I'm willing to deal with it for as long as I can. Start work soon and I know that will make it even more difficult. So congrats to those who have the luck with baby.
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by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:33 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Junebaby18
by Nannerz on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:38 AM
How much are you pumping out each time you pump?
BennyBaby09
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:41 AM
Have you tried an IBCLC? LLL is a great resource they usually have local one that can help free (I believe)
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juliasmom24
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:45 AM
I have been online LLL and have even tried the nipple shield with no success. I haven't tried IBCLC. Though I will def. Look into it. :-)
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juliasmom24
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:51 AM
@Jennybaby09 I just got done pumping after a little over 3 hrs, I pumped for about 20min. And 3.3 ounces that's when I'm lucky sometimes when I pump everytwo hours I only get 2 ounces if that.
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juliasmom24
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:51 AM
:-/


Quoting juliasmom24:

I wish I could breast feed exclusivley but instead I have been pumping since day 2 of my daughters birth. She is now 2 months old. I pump and supplement with formula because of not producing enough. I tried breastfeeding but she never really latched on. I've tried multiple lactation consultants and nothing but supplements to drink have really worked. If I had my way I would be exclusivley breastfeeding but things don't always work out. And trust my pumping every 2-3 hr. Sucks and is painful. For now because I want the best for my daughter I'm willing to deal with it for as long as I can. Start work soon and I know that will make it even more difficult. So congrats to those who have the luck with baby.

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juliasmom24
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:52 AM
:-/


Quoting BennyBaby09:

Have you tried an IBCLC? LLL is a great resource they usually have local one that can help free (I believe)

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juliasmom24
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:53 AM
:-/
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BennyBaby09
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 12:56 AM
1 mom liked this
Your doing great, and the best you can to give your child a good start so don't get down. There may be something like a tongue tie going on that is affecting her latch. Can you describe why you think her latch is bad? Maybe we can offer some better advice if we knew what was going on.
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doulala
by on Jan. 22, 2013 at 1:01 AM

Have you tried using the pumped milk/formula with a SNS?   (feed at the breast)

You can make your own formula, too, if you don't like the quality of commercial, or get milk from a bank so you don't use any formula at all.

maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Jan. 22, 2013 at 1:07 AM


Quoting juliasmom24:

@Jennybaby09 I just got done pumping after a little over 3 hrs, I pumped for about 20min. And 3.3 ounces that's when I'm lucky sometimes when I pump everytwo hours I only get 2 ounces if that.

That is good pumping output!

You only need 24-32 ounces in 24 hours and it sounds like you are pretty close to that. Can you add af ew pumping sessions?

What kind of pump do you have?

Are you doing "hands on pumping" https://breastfeedingusa.org/content/article/pump-more-milk-use-hands-pumping

Here's some info for you:

https://breastfeedingusa.org/content/article/breast-versus-bottle-how-much-milk-should-baby-take

Breast Versus Bottle: How much milk should baby take?

Q: Why does my breastfed baby take at most 4 ounces (120 mL) from the bottle when my neighbor’s formula-fed baby takes 7 or 8 ounces (210-240 mL)? Am I doing something wrong?

A: You are not doing anything wrong. And in this case, more is not necessarily better. Formula-fed babies typically consume much more milk at each feeding than breastfed babies, but they are also more likely to grow into overweight children and adults.1,2 One large study (16,755 babies in Belarus) compared feeding volumes in formula-fed and breastfed babies and found that the formula-fed babies consumed 49% more milk at 1 month, 57% at 3 months, and 71% at 5 months.3 Australian research found that between 1 and 6 months of age breastfed babies consistently take on average around 3 ounces (90mL) at a feeding. (Younger babies with smaller tummies take less milk.)

Breastfed babies’ milk intake doesn’t increase from months 1 to 6 because their growth rate slows.4 As growth slows, breastfed babies continue to get bigger and heavier on about the same daily milk intake, averaging about 25 ounces (750 mL) per 24 hours.

Why do formula-fed babies drink so much more milk? There are several reasons:

The bottle flows more consistently. During the first 3 to 4 months of life, after swallowing, an inborn reflex automatically triggers suckling.5 Milk flows more consistently from the bottle than the breast (which has a natural ebb and flow due to milk ejections, or let-downs), so babies tend to consume more milk from the bottle at a feeding. Before this reflexive suckling is outgrown, babies fed by bottle are at greater risk of overfeeding.

Breastfeeding gives babies more control over milk intake. Not seeing how much milk is in the breast makes a breastfeeding mother less likely to coax her baby to continue after he’s full.3,6 As the breastfed baby grows and thrives, his mother learns to trust her baby to take what he needs from both breast and bottle and also solid foods when they are introduced later. One U.K. study found that between 6 and 12 months of age breastfeeding mothers put less pressure on their babies to eat solid foods and were more sensitive to their babies’ cues.7

More milk in the bottle means more milk consumed. In the Belarus study mentioned before, babies took more formula at feedings when their mothers offered bottles containing more than 6 ounces (180 mL).3

Mother’s milk and formula are metabolized differently. Formula-fed babies use the nutrients in formula less efficiently,8 so they may need more milk to meet their nutritional needs. Formula is also missing hormones, such as leptin and adiponectin, which help babies regulate appetite and energy metabolism.9,10 Even babies’ sleep metabolism is affected, with formula-fed babies burning more calories during sleep than breastfed babies.11

Q: If my baby takes more milk from the bottle than I can express at one sitting, does that mean my milk production is low?

A: See the previous answer. Babies commonly take more milk from the bottle than they do from the breast. The fast, consistent milk flow of the bottle makes overfeeding more likely. So if your baby takes more milk from the bottle than you express, by itself this is not an indicator of low milk production.

To reduce the amount of expressed milk needed and to decrease the risk of overfeeding, take steps to slow milk flow during bottle-feeding:

  • Use the slowest flow nipple/teat the baby will accept.
  • Suggest the feeder try holding the baby in a more upright position with the bottle horizontal to slow flow and help the baby feel full on less milk.
  • Short breaks during bottle-feeding can also help baby “realize” he’s full before he takes more milk than needed.
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