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emergency need advice asap

Posted by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:41 PM
  • 10 Replies

my son was just diagnosed with staph infection of the throat.... as was his friend next door!  here is the issue I have not been tested for it yet I have an apt tomorrow morning my daughter who is 3 mnths is still ebf my question is should I look for donnor milk asap and just pump and dump for now until I get tested and wait for results??  the nurse who called with my son's diagnosis was NO help at all and told me to ask my dr in the morning... the same dr who suggested that I start using gentlese formula for my daughter so I could pair a mood stabilizer with my birth control because it was causing me to have severe mood swings... so instead I tossed the bc.  i'm in a panick right now... what if i have it and have been passing it to my daughter through my breast milk!!!!  I'm freaking out right now!!!

by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:41 PM
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jjchick75
by Gold Member on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:43 PM
1 mom liked this

You can't pass an infection through your breastmilk but you do pass on antibodies! Nursing is the best thing you can do for baby right now! 

K8wizzo
by Kate on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:46 PM
1 mom liked this

Nurse.  You are passing antibodies to her, not an infection.

Should breastfeeding continue when mom is sick?

JULY 29, 2011. Posted in: ILLNESS, SURGERY & MEDICAL PROCEDURES,MOM'S HEALTH

By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC

It is very, very rare for a mom to need to stop breastfeeding for any illness. There are only a few very serious illnesses that might require a mom stop breastfeeding for a period of time or permanently. Per Dr. Ruth Lawrence, “HIV and HTLV-1 are the only infectious diseases that are considered absolute contraindications to breastfeeding in developed countries” (Lawrence & Lawrence 2001).

During any “ordinary” illness such as a cold, sore throat, flu, tummy bug, fever, mastitis, etc. you should continue to breastfeed. Just remind your doctor you are nursing so that if medications are needed he can prescribe something that is compatible with breastfeeding. Most medications are safe to take while breastfeeding, and for those that are not recommended there is almost always an alternative medication that is safe.

If mom has food poisoning, breastfeeding should continue. As long as the symptoms are confined to the gastrointestinal tract (vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps), breastfeeding should continue without interruption as there is no risk to the baby. This is the case with most occurences of food poisoning. If the food poisoning progresses to septicemia, meaning the bacteria has passed into mom’s bloodstream (mom would most likely be hospitalized), see this guidance from Dr. Ruth Lawrence:

“Maternal infections of the genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract do not pose a risk to infants except in the rare circumstances when septicemia occurs and bacteria might reach the milk. Even in this event, continued breastfeeding while the mother receives appropriate antibiotic therapy that is compatible with breastfeeding is the safest course for the infant. If the infecting organism is especially virulent or contagious (e.g., an invasive group A streptococcal infection causing severe disease in the mother), breastfeeding should continue after a temporary suspension during the first 24 hours of maternal therapy. Prophylactic or empiric therapy for the infant, against the same organism, may be indicated.” [source: Lawrence RM & Lawrence RA. Given the Benefits of Breastfeeding, what Contraindications Exist? 
Pediatric Clinics of North America
 2001 (February);48(1): 235-51.]

The best thing you can do for your baby when you’re sick is to continue to breastfeed.When you have a contagious illness such as a cold, flu, or other mild virus, your baby was exposed to the illness before you even knew you were sick. Your milk will not transmit your illness to baby, but it does have antibodies in it that are specific to your illness (plus anything else you or baby have been exposed to) – they’ll help prevent baby from getting sick, or if he does get sick, he’ll probably not be as sick as you.

Withholding your breastmilk during an illness increases
the possibility that baby will get sick, and deprives baby
of the comfort and superior nutrition of nursing.

You can also take measures to prevent baby from getting sick by doing the usual things to prevent the spread of illness: washing hands often, avoid sneezing/coughing on baby, limiting face-to-face contact, etc .

When you’re sick, it can help to just tuck baby into bed beside you and nurse lying down whenever baby gets hungry. If baby starts getting sick and not wanting to nurse, then see Baby refuses to nurse when sick.

Many times moms don’t nurse frequently enough and don’t get enough fluids to keep the milk supply going. Sometimes medications can cause your milk supply to diminish, as well. To avoid a decreased milk supply, drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration, continue to nurse often and avoid/limit any medications that tend to decrease milk supply.

Journeysmama11
by Member on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:49 PM
1 mom liked this

Your breastmilk fights off infection. From what I just read, staph infections can not be passed through breastmilk.


Kayla-Kay
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:57 PM

Thank you so much! I am still freaking out about my son having staph in his throat... the dr said it is common for this age especially since our neighbor has it and its spread through direct contact ;( so for example kids sharing slobber toys and cups spoons etc.... 

Quoting K8wizzo:

Nurse.  You are passing antibodies to her, not an infection.

Should breastfeeding continue when mom is sick?

JULY 29, 2011. Posted in: ILLNESS, SURGERY & MEDICAL PROCEDURES,MOM'S HEALTH

By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC

It is very, very rare for a mom to need to stop breastfeeding for any illness. There are only a few very serious illnesses that might require a mom stop breastfeeding for a period of time or permanently. Per Dr. Ruth Lawrence, “HIV and HTLV-1 are the only infectious diseases that are considered absolute contraindications to breastfeeding in developed countries” (Lawrence & Lawrence 2001).

During any “ordinary” illness such as a cold, sore throat, flu, tummy bug, fever, mastitis, etc. you should continue to breastfeed. Just remind your doctor you are nursing so that if medications are needed he can prescribe something that is compatible with breastfeeding. Most medications are safe to take while breastfeeding, and for those that are not recommended there is almost always an alternative medication that is safe.

If mom has food poisoning, breastfeeding should continue. As long as the symptoms are confined to the gastrointestinal tract (vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps), breastfeeding should continue without interruption as there is no risk to the baby. This is the case with most occurences of food poisoning. If the food poisoning progresses to septicemia, meaning the bacteria has passed into mom’s bloodstream (mom would most likely be hospitalized), see this guidance from Dr. Ruth Lawrence:

“Maternal infections of the genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract do not pose a risk to infants except in the rare circumstances when septicemia occurs and bacteria might reach the milk. Even in this event, continued breastfeeding while the mother receives appropriate antibiotic therapy that is compatible with breastfeeding is the safest course for the infant. If the infecting organism is especially virulent or contagious (e.g., an invasive group A streptococcal infection causing severe disease in the mother), breastfeeding should continue after a temporary suspension during the first 24 hours of maternal therapy. Prophylactic or empiric therapy for the infant, against the same organism, may be indicated.” [source: Lawrence RM & Lawrence RA. Given the Benefits of Breastfeeding, what Contraindications Exist? 
Pediatric Clinics of North America
 2001 (February);48(1): 235-51.]

The best thing you can do for your baby when you’re sick is to continue to breastfeed.When you have a contagious illness such as a cold, flu, or other mild virus, your baby was exposed to the illness before you even knew you were sick. Your milk will not transmit your illness to baby, but it does have antibodies in it that are specific to your illness (plus anything else you or baby have been exposed to) – they’ll help prevent baby from getting sick, or if he does get sick, he’ll probably not be as sick as you.

Withholding your breastmilk during an illness increases
the possibility that baby will get sick, and deprives baby
of the comfort and superior nutrition of nursing.

You can also take measures to prevent baby from getting sick by doing the usual things to prevent the spread of illness: washing hands often, avoid sneezing/coughing on baby, limiting face-to-face contact, etc .

When you’re sick, it can help to just tuck baby into bed beside you and nurse lying down whenever baby gets hungry. If baby starts getting sick and not wanting to nurse, then see Baby refuses to nurse when sick.

Many times moms don’t nurse frequently enough and don’t get enough fluids to keep the milk supply going. Sometimes medications can cause your milk supply to diminish, as well. To avoid a decreased milk supply, drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration, continue to nurse often and avoid/limit any medications that tend to decrease milk supply.


K8wizzo
by Kate on Jan. 31, 2013 at 3:06 PM

Staph and strep are very common bacteria and some strains of them typically live in your body in controlled amounts.  Staph doesn't necessarily mean MRSA unless your doctor specifically mentioned that so I wouldn't be too worried about it.

Quoting Kayla-Kay:

Thank you so much! I am still freaking out about my son having staph in his throat... the dr said it is common for this age especially since our neighbor has it and its spread through direct contact ;( so for example kids sharing slobber toys and cups spoons etc.... 

Quoting K8wizzo:

Nurse.  You are passing antibodies to her, not an infection.

Should breastfeeding continue when mom is sick?

JULY 29, 2011. Posted in: ILLNESS, SURGERY & MEDICAL PROCEDURES,MOM'S HEALTH

By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC

It is very, very rare for a mom to need to stop breastfeeding for any illness. There are only a few very serious illnesses that might require a mom stop breastfeeding for a period of time or permanently. Per Dr. Ruth Lawrence, “HIV and HTLV-1 are the only infectious diseases that are considered absolute contraindications to breastfeeding in developed countries” (Lawrence & Lawrence 2001).

During any “ordinary” illness such as a cold, sore throat, flu, tummy bug, fever, mastitis, etc. you should continue to breastfeed. Just remind your doctor you are nursing so that if medications are needed he can prescribe something that is compatible with breastfeeding. Most medications are safe to take while breastfeeding, and for those that are not recommended there is almost always an alternative medication that is safe.

If mom has food poisoning, breastfeeding should continue. As long as the symptoms are confined to the gastrointestinal tract (vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps), breastfeeding should continue without interruption as there is no risk to the baby. This is the case with most occurences of food poisoning. If the food poisoning progresses to septicemia, meaning the bacteria has passed into mom’s bloodstream (mom would most likely be hospitalized), see this guidance from Dr. Ruth Lawrence:

“Maternal infections of the genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract do not pose a risk to infants except in the rare circumstances when septicemia occurs and bacteria might reach the milk. Even in this event, continued breastfeeding while the mother receives appropriate antibiotic therapy that is compatible with breastfeeding is the safest course for the infant. If the infecting organism is especially virulent or contagious (e.g., an invasive group A streptococcal infection causing severe disease in the mother), breastfeeding should continue after a temporary suspension during the first 24 hours of maternal therapy. Prophylactic or empiric therapy for the infant, against the same organism, may be indicated.” [source: Lawrence RM & Lawrence RA. Given the Benefits of Breastfeeding, what Contraindications Exist? 
Pediatric Clinics of North America
 2001 (February);48(1): 235-51.]

The best thing you can do for your baby when you’re sick is to continue to breastfeed.When you have a contagious illness such as a cold, flu, or other mild virus, your baby was exposed to the illness before you even knew you were sick. Your milk will not transmit your illness to baby, but it does have antibodies in it that are specific to your illness (plus anything else you or baby have been exposed to) – they’ll help prevent baby from getting sick, or if he does get sick, he’ll probably not be as sick as you.

Withholding your breastmilk during an illness increases
the possibility that baby will get sick, and deprives baby
of the comfort and superior nutrition of nursing.

You can also take measures to prevent baby from getting sick by doing the usual things to prevent the spread of illness: washing hands often, avoid sneezing/coughing on baby, limiting face-to-face contact, etc .

When you’re sick, it can help to just tuck baby into bed beside you and nurse lying down whenever baby gets hungry. If baby starts getting sick and not wanting to nurse, then see Baby refuses to nurse when sick.

Many times moms don’t nurse frequently enough and don’t get enough fluids to keep the milk supply going. Sometimes medications can cause your milk supply to diminish, as well. To avoid a decreased milk supply, drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration, continue to nurse often and avoid/limit any medications that tend to decrease milk supply.



Kayla-Kay
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 3:47 PM
She did say that it was NOT mrsa thank God for that!!!!

And we are treating it with amoxicillin and sanitizing everything I mean everything in this house


Quoting K8wizzo:

Staph and strep are very common bacteria and some strains of them typically live in your body in controlled amounts.  Staph doesn't necessarily mean MRSA unless your doctor specifically mentioned that so I wouldn't be too worried about it.

Quoting Kayla-Kay:

Thank you so much! I am still freaking out about my son having staph in his throat... the dr said it is common for this age especially since our neighbor has it and its spread through direct contact ;( so for example kids sharing slobber toys and cups spoons etc.... 

Quoting K8wizzo:

Nurse.  You are passing antibodies to her, not an infection.

Should breastfeeding continue when mom is sick?

JULY 29, 2011. Posted in: ILLNESS, SURGERY & MEDICAL PROCEDURES,MOM'S HEALTH

By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC

It is very, very rare for a mom to need to stop breastfeeding for any illness. There are only a few very serious illnesses that might require a mom stop breastfeeding for a period of time or permanently. Per Dr. Ruth Lawrence, “HIV and HTLV-1 are the only infectious diseases that are considered absolute contraindications to breastfeeding in developed countries” (Lawrence & Lawrence 2001).

During any “ordinary” illness such as a cold, sore throat, flu, tummy bug, fever, mastitis, etc. you should continue to breastfeed. Just remind your doctor you are nursing so that if medications are needed he can prescribe something that is compatible with breastfeeding. Most medications are safe to take while breastfeeding, and for those that are not recommended there is almost always an alternative medication that is safe.

If mom has food poisoning, breastfeeding should continue. As long as the symptoms are confined to the gastrointestinal tract (vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps), breastfeeding should continue without interruption as there is no risk to the baby. This is the case with most occurences of food poisoning. If the food poisoning progresses to septicemia, meaning the bacteria has passed into mom’s bloodstream (mom would most likely be hospitalized), see this guidance from Dr. Ruth Lawrence:

“Maternal infections of the genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract do not pose a risk to infants except in the rare circumstances when septicemia occurs and bacteria might reach the milk. Even in this event, continued breastfeeding while the mother receives appropriate antibiotic therapy that is compatible with breastfeeding is the safest course for the infant. If the infecting organism is especially virulent or contagious (e.g., an invasive group A streptococcal infection causing severe disease in the mother), breastfeeding should continue after a temporary suspension during the first 24 hours of maternal therapy. Prophylactic or empiric therapy for the infant, against the same organism, may be indicated.” [source: Lawrence RM & Lawrence RA. Given the Benefits of Breastfeeding, what Contraindications Exist? 
Pediatric Clinics of North America
 2001 (February);48(1): 235-51.]

The best thing you can do for your baby when you’re sick is to continue to breastfeed.When you have a contagious illness such as a cold, flu, or other mild virus, your baby was exposed to the illness before you even knew you were sick. Your milk will not transmit your illness to baby, but it does have antibodies in it that are specific to your illness (plus anything else you or baby have been exposed to) – they’ll help prevent baby from getting sick, or if he does get sick, he’ll probably not be as sick as you.

Withholding your breastmilk during an illness increases
the possibility that baby will get sick, and deprives baby
of the comfort and superior nutrition of nursing.

You can also take measures to prevent baby from getting sick by doing the usual things to prevent the spread of illness: washing hands often, avoid sneezing/coughing on baby, limiting face-to-face contact, etc .

When you’re sick, it can help to just tuck baby into bed beside you and nurse lying down whenever baby gets hungry. If baby starts getting sick and not wanting to nurse, then see Baby refuses to nurse when sick.

Many times moms don’t nurse frequently enough and don’t get enough fluids to keep the milk supply going. Sometimes medications can cause your milk supply to diminish, as well. To avoid a decreased milk supply, drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration, continue to nurse often and avoid/limit any medications that tend to decrease milk supply.



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K8wizzo
by Kate on Jan. 31, 2013 at 4:27 PM

Good. :)  Really though, it's a pretty common childhood illness and nothing to be overly concerned about.  You'll likely see quite a few more illnesses before your kids are grown.

Quoting Kayla-Kay:

She did say that it was NOT mrsa thank God for that!!!!

And we are treating it with amoxicillin and sanitizing everything I mean everything in this house


Quoting K8wizzo:

Staph and strep are very common bacteria and some strains of them typically live in your body in controlled amounts.  Staph doesn't necessarily mean MRSA unless your doctor specifically mentioned that so I wouldn't be too worried about it.

Quoting Kayla-Kay:

Thank you so much! I am still freaking out about my son having staph in his throat... the dr said it is common for this age especially since our neighbor has it and its spread through direct contact ;( so for example kids sharing slobber toys and cups spoons etc.... 

Quoting K8wizzo:

Nurse.  You are passing antibodies to her, not an infection.

Should breastfeeding continue when mom is sick?

JULY 29, 2011. Posted in: ILLNESS, SURGERY & MEDICAL PROCEDURES,MOM'S HEALTH

By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC

It is very, very rare for a mom to need to stop breastfeeding for any illness. There are only a few very serious illnesses that might require a mom stop breastfeeding for a period of time or permanently. Per Dr. Ruth Lawrence, “HIV and HTLV-1 are the only infectious diseases that are considered absolute contraindications to breastfeeding in developed countries” (Lawrence & Lawrence 2001).

During any “ordinary” illness such as a cold, sore throat, flu, tummy bug, fever, mastitis, etc. you should continue to breastfeed. Just remind your doctor you are nursing so that if medications are needed he can prescribe something that is compatible with breastfeeding. Most medications are safe to take while breastfeeding, and for those that are not recommended there is almost always an alternative medication that is safe.

If mom has food poisoning, breastfeeding should continue. As long as the symptoms are confined to the gastrointestinal tract (vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps), breastfeeding should continue without interruption as there is no risk to the baby. This is the case with most occurences of food poisoning. If the food poisoning progresses to septicemia, meaning the bacteria has passed into mom’s bloodstream (mom would most likely be hospitalized), see this guidance from Dr. Ruth Lawrence:

“Maternal infections of the genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract do not pose a risk to infants except in the rare circumstances when septicemia occurs and bacteria might reach the milk. Even in this event, continued breastfeeding while the mother receives appropriate antibiotic therapy that is compatible with breastfeeding is the safest course for the infant. If the infecting organism is especially virulent or contagious (e.g., an invasive group A streptococcal infection causing severe disease in the mother), breastfeeding should continue after a temporary suspension during the first 24 hours of maternal therapy. Prophylactic or empiric therapy for the infant, against the same organism, may be indicated.” [source: Lawrence RM & Lawrence RA. Given the Benefits of Breastfeeding, what Contraindications Exist? 
Pediatric Clinics of North America
 2001 (February);48(1): 235-51.]

The best thing you can do for your baby when you’re sick is to continue to breastfeed.When you have a contagious illness such as a cold, flu, or other mild virus, your baby was exposed to the illness before you even knew you were sick. Your milk will not transmit your illness to baby, but it does have antibodies in it that are specific to your illness (plus anything else you or baby have been exposed to) – they’ll help prevent baby from getting sick, or if he does get sick, he’ll probably not be as sick as you.

Withholding your breastmilk during an illness increases
the possibility that baby will get sick, and deprives baby
of the comfort and superior nutrition of nursing.

You can also take measures to prevent baby from getting sick by doing the usual things to prevent the spread of illness: washing hands often, avoid sneezing/coughing on baby, limiting face-to-face contact, etc .

When you’re sick, it can help to just tuck baby into bed beside you and nurse lying down whenever baby gets hungry. If baby starts getting sick and not wanting to nurse, then see Baby refuses to nurse when sick.

Many times moms don’t nurse frequently enough and don’t get enough fluids to keep the milk supply going. Sometimes medications can cause your milk supply to diminish, as well. To avoid a decreased milk supply, drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration, continue to nurse often and avoid/limit any medications that tend to decrease milk supply.




maggiemom2000
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 5:00 PM

The WORST thing you could do would be to stop breastfeeding her. You have both been exposed (since before your DS even showed the first symptoms). Stopping breastfeeding you take away the thing that is protecting her the most! She is significantly less likely to get it if she continues to nurse (directly from the breast gives her the most antibodies). If, worst case scenario one or both if you get it, you can both take the antibiotics.

You may want to pump some and give it to your 2 yr old to drink. Especially with the infection in his throat, that milk will coat the infection and attack it with both antibodies and live white blood cells. Freshly pumped is best.

aehanrahan
by Group Admin - Amy on Jan. 31, 2013 at 5:31 PM
THIS!!!
I completely agree with giving some pumped milk to your older son. It really can help!


Quoting maggiemom2000:

The WORST thing you could do would be to stop breastfeeding her. You have both been exposed (since before your DS even showed the first symptoms). Stopping breastfeeding you take away the thing that is protecting her the most! She is significantly less likely to get it if she continues to nurse (directly from the breast gives her the most antibodies). If, worst case scenario one or both if you get it, you can both take the antibiotics.

You may want to pump some and give it to your 2 yr old to drink. Especially with the infection in his throat, that milk will coat the infection and attack it with both antibodies and live white blood cells. Freshly pumped is best.

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Paradys
by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 5:39 PM
Also breastmilk eases inflammation, so that might make him a bit better.
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