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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

No nutritional value in bm after 1 year???

Posted by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:10 AM
  • 56 Replies

DD is 16 months.  Has not gained weight in the last 7 months.  Still bf.  Not eating enough solids. 

There is a feeding team coming to watch her eat today to see if they can recomment anything.

I also got a referal to see a dietician, who actually just called me.  When i mentionned to her that I was still breastfeeding, she said that passed the age of 1, there is no nutritional value in bm anymore - that bf at that point is only for bonding.


Really????  That is so not what I heard and read!

by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:10 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Amberleigh81
by Silver Member on Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:14 AM
11 moms liked this
I would cancel my appointment with someone so uneducated.
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momonetime
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:35 AM
Yup!!


Quoting Amberleigh81:

I would cancel my appointment with someone so uneducated.

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MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:40 AM
Check kellymom.com -- search "nutritional value of breastmilk". They are 100% wrong! Print it off for them an remind them that the American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend breastfeeding for at least two years! Can you give us a complete weight history on him?
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:59 AM
1 mom liked this

What's the weight history? While on the face of it not gaining for months doesn't sound good, if she gained a LOT before then things will level out, and yes, for months at a time!

SadieJames
by Sarah on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:37 AM
7 moms liked this

Like at 364 days its good for them but at 365 it turns to water...? Stupid.

eema.gray
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:43 AM
1 mom liked this

If she's hving difficulty with solids, physical difficulty, that **can** be an indication of something wrong in her mouth. 

My son has apraxia of speech.  It is a neurological condition and in short form is a short circuit between the speech centers in his brain and the muscles in his mouth.  He was functionally non verbal until he started getting therapy at age 3.  Many children with his condition are diagnosed between 6 and 18 months of age, when they present with feeding difficulties, aversions to certain textures, gagging, easily choking, etc.  My son had no feeding issues, which I partially attribute to having a relatively minor example of the condition and partially to nursing past a year AND baby led solids.

Who is sending out the feeding team?  In your shoes, I would want an assessment team from your county's early intervention office to evaluate him.  Reason being that if there is an actual problem, more than likely it will require occupational/physical therapy in addition to speech/feeding therapy (speech pathologists usually also have training in feeding therapy for babies because good eating skills exercise the muscles needed for speaking).  The E.I. team will also be less likely to be biased against long term nursing and therefore more likely to look for the root of the problem, not just a placebo "stop nursing" solution.

proudmama11212
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:45 AM
My mom told me that she asked a doctor about it and the doctor said it turns water so i print all research that says different for her and she was like this is helpful good for you to plan to breastfeed at least 3 years if bryan doesnt self wean
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paknari
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:48 AM
It's still good for them but you should be doing more solids. What type of solids are you giving her? And what are you eating?
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mamabens
by Miranda on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:51 AM

I'm a smart ass but I would have told her to prove it because every other thing I read said just the opposite. I'd cancel any appts with her & ignore any advice she has for you.

 BabyFruit Ticker


Cleo07
by Bronze Member on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:52 AM
Ditto on needing a weight history here. Many breastfed babies gain very quickly and then when they get active, stop gaining and settle into their natural growth curve where they may stay for several months before gaining weight again.

I also would not see a dietician who is so uneducated about breastfeeding and so quick to go against the WHO recommendation of breastfeeding for 2 years.

Furthermore, breastfeeding till two or beyond offers other non nutritional advantages like bite and jaw development and also benefits to your health as well with a marked decrease in breast cancer risk.
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