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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

is it acceptible?

Posted by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 7:59 PM
  • 9 Replies

my luella was discharged at 5 lbs 9oz 19 inches long today she was 6 lbs 11 ox and 20 1/2 inches she is 16 days old. i was told she needs to be put on fourmula and no bm! the doc we went to today is NOT the one i picked but had to see this one because i cant drive yet and didnt have a ride to take her to the doc i like.

by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 7:59 PM
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Replies (1-9):
speidelboys
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 8:00 PM

ps i plan on bfing untill i get a second opnion. becuse the docs here are quacks and there not good with kids at all.

 

justone_jen
by Jen on Feb. 14, 2013 at 8:04 PM
She's gained a pound in two weeks. I believe ideally, we want to see 4-6 ounces of gain per week, so she's fine.

It's 5-9 oz per week, I just checked. Still fine.
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lovinmyboys...
by Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 8:06 PM
3 moms liked this
Time for a new doc.
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justone_jen
by Jen on Feb. 14, 2013 at 8:07 PM

 http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/weight-gain/

Average Weight Gain for Breastfed Babies

August 14, 2011. Posted in: Growth & Development,What is Normal?

© Miroslav Beneda - Fotolia.com

Baby’s Age Average Weight Gain 1 Average Weight Gain 2,3
0-4 months 5.5 – 8.5 ounces per week 5 – 7 ounces per week †
4-6 months 3.25 – 4.5 ounces per week 4 – 5 ounces per week
6-12 months 1.75 – 2.75 ounces per week ‡ 2 – 4 ounces per week
[click here to see tables in Metric Units]† It is acceptable for some babies to gain 4-5 ounces per week.‡ The average breastfed baby doubles birth weight by 3-4 months. By one year, the typical breastfed baby will weigh about 2 1/2 – 3 times birth weight. 1Sources:

  1. World Health Organization Child Growth Standards, 2006. Available at: http://www.who.int/childgrowth/en/. To figure average weight gain, we used the weight-per-age percentile charts for birth – 5 years. The range is a combination of boys and girls 5% to 95%, rounded to the nearest quarter-ounce. Click here for more details on calculations [PDF file].
  2. Riordan J. Breastfeeding and Human Lactation, 3rd ed. Boston: Jones and Bartlett, 2005, p. 103, 512-513.
  3. Mohrbacher N and Stock J. The Breastfeeding Answer Book, Third Revised ed. Schaumburg, Illinois: La Leche League International, 2003, p. 148-149.

 

Baby’s Age Avg. Length Increase Avg. Head Circumference Increase
0-6 months 1 inch per month 1/2 inch per month
6-12 months † 1/2 inch per month 1/4 inch per month
[click here to see tables in Metric Units]† By one year, the typical breastfed baby will increase birth length by 50% and head circumference by 33%.Source: Mohrbacher N and Stock J. The Breastfeeding Answer Book, Third Revised ed. Schaumburg, Illinois: La Leche League International, 2003, p. 148-149.

 

 

See also the Infant growth calculators and breastfed baby growth charts @

 

A few things to keep in mind when evaluating weight gain

A 5-7% weight loss during the first 3-4 days after birth is normal. A 10% weight loss is sometimes considered normal, but this amount of weight loss is a sign that the breastfeeding needs to be evaluated. It’s a good idea to have a routine weight check at 5 days (baby should be gaining rather than losing weight by day 5), so that any developing problems can be caught and remedied early.

Baby should regain birth weight by 10 days to 2 weeks. If your baby lost a good bit of weight in the early days, or if your baby is sick or premature, it may take longer to regain birth weight. If baby does not regain birth weight by two weeks, this is a sign that the breastfeeding needs to be evaluated.

Always figure weight gain from the lowest point rather than from baby’s birth weight.

Baby needs to be weighed on the same scale with the same amount of clothing (preferably naked) each time to get an accurate picture of weight gain. Different scales can give very different readings (I’ve personally seen a difference of a pound in two different scales); clothing or diapers can vary in weight and throw the numbers off. The scale should be zeroed before weighing, and baby should be centered on the scale tray. It’s never a bad idea to do a second measurement (it should be close to the first) and then use an average of the two measurements. If your baby is very active or distressed, don’t expect to get an accurate measurement. Babies grow in spurts rather than at a steady rate – to keep from needless worrying, it’s generally best to weigh baby no more often than once a week.

 

MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on Feb. 14, 2013 at 8:51 PM
You should see an average of a pound a MONTH gained from the lowest weight. You are doing amazing. And a lot of what was posted above is not entirely true. 10% loss is fine if fluids were given. Most babies continue to lose the entire first week. My 8 month old just passed double his birth weight (normal). Remember always an average of a pound a MONTH from the LOWEST weight.
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Mrsfarr
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 9:00 PM
1 mom liked this
Keep breast feeding. Most pediatricians are woefully uninformed when it comes to such things.
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ACrowsNest
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 9:01 PM

What is wrong with some doctors??? If I were you I'd NEVER see that doctor again!

Journeysmama11
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 9:24 PM

My dr said this to me with my dd because her birth weight was wrong. she was full of fluid, they said she was 8lbs when she was actually so full of fluid she was 7lbs 2 oz. less than 2hrs after being born! so they were also saying "back to birth weight" and her birthweight was incorrect. The dr kept saying to supplement...My supply was enough for 4 babies! FOUR! I was getting 8oz about every hour!!! I stored a lot up thankfully but because he told me to just do formula I was scared for my baby so I did...unfortunately I was uninformed and a new mom and was afraid of hurting my baby! I'm SO glad we have a new amazing dr and I am much more informed and I really want to be  a lactation consultant now because of my experience! My son is nearly 7 months and still bf! No supplementing! You can do it and you are doing awesome! Get a new dr though! :)

asaffell
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 9:34 PM

Baby is fine. Don't see that doctor anymore.

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