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...what my poor baby girl is categorized as. After satisfying weight gain, she lost a few ounces since last week. I know she gained quite a bit since her last weight check last week, but seeing as how I don't have a scale, I'm not sure exactly what she gained. Anyway, they wanted to admit her to be monitored. She doesn't have to have any labs or anything since her doctor took care of that a couple weeks ago and those all checked out. She had an appointment with an ENT on Tuesday, but he didn't see anything wrong with her tongue. My IBCLC thought that she may have been tongue tied, but guess not. They have me pumping, then feeding her (I know pumping isn't an indicator of what I'm producing, but I learned that apparently my right one is on strike for pumping lol), and finally, topping her off with formula. She's not a fan of the formula, but she'll drink it eventually if she's hungry enough. I'm not stressing, because I know that I don't necessarily have to rely on formula, but I will do the bare minimum to keep her happy while in the hospital.

On the bright side, this hospital stay is a nice little vaycay from the drama going on in my house. I'll miss my 2 year old son, but he's in good hands. Anyway, keep my little girl in your thoughts! :)
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by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 9:09 PM
Replies (21-30):
tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Feb. 15, 2013 at 8:45 AM

I'm running on this same wavelength


Quoting IrishIz:

I'm going to be very honest with you...to the point that you may not like it.

Something is wrong in this picture and I'm not saying it is your daughter.

There is nothing that you posted that suggests failure to thrive.  She is at an appropriate weight with appropriate growth.  Being on a 3rd percent doesn't mean failure to thrive...that means that somebody has to be there in order for the growth chart to exist.  You know how you have the fat friend and the skinny friend...same thing with babies.  There has to be a fat baby and a skinny baby and a "regular" baby for that growth chart to exist.  That chart compares the weights and lengths of other babies.  It doesn't mean 3rd percent with some spot on there normal...it means 97% of kids weigh more than her.  Period.  That's it.  So your spot on the chart doesn't define anything important.

You made it clear you would rather be in the hospital.  Why?  What haven't you told us?  What is going on?

A hospital is a place where there are risks.  As soon as a healthy person enters the doors of the hospital their risk of disease and infection and complication increase.  Why do you want your daughter, with no obvious medical issues, there?  What is going on at home?

The tip/tongue tie...if the IBCLC is suspicious and the ENT saw something but doesn't think it effects breastfeeding...new ENT.  The ENT shouldn't be trying to determine if it effects breastfeeding when there are signs that it very well might be.  Find a new ENT or dentist or somebody who can do the clip.

What is going on that you want to be in the hospital?



K8wizzo
by Kate on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:01 AM

This.  From what I've read, lip tie/tongue tie ARE an issue and you need to be forceful to get someone to revise them.  Nothing is saying this is worth a hospital visit here except that you seem to be afraid to be at home.

Self Help



Tongue Tie Help    Latch Help

Is My Baby Tongue-tied?

Now that more mothers are breastfeeding, tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is on the forefront of medical research again. Some tongue-tied babies breastfeed without difficulty, others cause their mother pain, don't get enough milk, or have difficulty swallowing properly and are very unhappy during and after feeding.

If you are concerned that your baby may be tongue-tied, the following may help you decide if you need more help. An IBCLC (International Board Certified Lactation Consultant) can help with breastfeeding, and many different dentists and doctors can help if your baby needs treatment for tongue-tie. Seehttp://www.lowmilksupply.org/frenotomy.shtml for a list of doctors and dentists who are particularly good at diagnosing and treating tongue-tie.

The first thing to assess is whether your baby can stick out his or her tongue. If you touch your baby's lips, he will probably open his mouth. You can then touch the front of his lower gum with your fingertip. This makes him stick the tongue out. We want to see the tongue come out flat over the lip, without dipping down or pointing down. If your baby can only stick his tongue out when his mouth is closed, that can indicate a posterior (further back) tongue-tie.


Next, we want to see if your baby can lift her tongue way up to the roof of the mouth. All the way up is perfect, half way is enough for most babies to be able to breastfeed. Again, her mouth should be wide open. Most tongue-tied babies can only lift their tongues when their mouths are mostly closed.


Obvious and Sneakier Tongue-ties:

This baby (figure 3) has an obvious tongue-tie. You can see the membrane right at the front of the tongue, and you can see how it makes it hard for him to lift his tongue up.

figure 3

The baby in figure 4 is also tongue-tied. If you run your finger along the outside of a baby's lower gum, her tongue will try to follow. If the tongue twists like this, it's a sign of tongue-tie.

figure 4

The baby in figure 5 has a sneaky (posterior) tongue-tie. You can see that it is difficult to get a finger under the tongue. If you press on the front of the little membrane under the tongue (the frenulum), a tied tongue will pull down in the center like this. This shows that the frenulum is tight and does not allow the tongue to move well. This diagnostic trick is called the Murphy Maneuver after Dr. Jim Murphy of California.

figure 5

Figure 6 shows a very sneaky tongue-tie - a posterior or submucosal one. The frenulum (membrane holding the tongue down) is hiding behind the floor of the mouth (the oral mucosa). You can see that the tongue doesn't lift very well, and that the floor of the mouth is tented out a little.

figure 6
figure 7

Notice how when the baby in figure 6 tries to lift her tongue (figure 7), nothing at all is visible except the limited ability to lift the tongue up.

Again, some babies with posterior or submucosal tongue-tie can breastfeed, others have a lot of difficulty. Moms breast and nipple shape and milk supply can make things easier or more difficult for the baby.

The best way to diagnose a posterior tongue-tie is to lift the tongue with a grooved director. Doctors who treat tongue-tie usually have one.


The final thing to do is watch your baby cry. If only the edges of the tongue curl up like in figure 9, that's a sure sign that the frenulum is tight.

figure 9

Now that you have an idea whether your baby has normal tongue movement ability or not, you can decide what kind of help may be most useful.


You can also take the Tongue-tie symptom questionare at Dr. James Ochi's site http://www.BabyTongueTie.com

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

I'm running on this same wavelength


Quoting IrishIz:

I'm going to be very honest with you...to the point that you may not like it.

Something is wrong in this picture and I'm not saying it is your daughter.

There is nothing that you posted that suggests failure to thrive.  She is at an appropriate weight with appropriate growth.  Being on a 3rd percent doesn't mean failure to thrive...that means that somebody has to be there in order for the growth chart to exist.  You know how you have the fat friend and the skinny friend...same thing with babies.  There has to be a fat baby and a skinny baby and a "regular" baby for that growth chart to exist.  That chart compares the weights and lengths of other babies.  It doesn't mean 3rd percent with some spot on there normal...it means 97% of kids weigh more than her.  Period.  That's it.  So your spot on the chart doesn't define anything important.

You made it clear you would rather be in the hospital.  Why?  What haven't you told us?  What is going on?

A hospital is a place where there are risks.  As soon as a healthy person enters the doors of the hospital their risk of disease and infection and complication increase.  Why do you want your daughter, with no obvious medical issues, there?  What is going on at home?

The tip/tongue tie...if the IBCLC is suspicious and the ENT saw something but doesn't think it effects breastfeeding...new ENT.  The ENT shouldn't be trying to determine if it effects breastfeeding when there are signs that it very well might be.  Find a new ENT or dentist or somebody who can do the clip.

What is going on that you want to be in the hospital?




lizzieiguana
by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:23 AM

SECOND OPINION!!!


aydensXmommy
by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:23 AM
There's nothing serious going on at home. Well, nothing that directly involves me, anyway. We have nine people in my house, and two if those people are going through problems if their own. I'm a person that would rather not deal with it if I'm not involved. I have so many responsibilities at home that aren't mine to deal with, and quite honestly, being here away from that has actually been quite nice. I am able to sleep, Abby is able to sleep, I'm able to pump way more here because I hardly can at home. I'd much rather her have my milk, I don't care how she gets it. Here, I'm able to do that. My son is in good hands while I'm gone (not at the house), so I don't have much to worry about. Here, I know exactly how much she is gaining. I have no clue at home. I'm just happy my baby girl is quite a lot happier the past day because it's actually been quiet.

Quoting mostlymaydays:

Twice you've mentioned that the hospital is a vacation compared to the drama at home. I have to ask if you're feeling threatened at home?



Quoting aydensXmommy:

Thank you for breaking it down for me. All the weights from 8 weeks to now are on the same scale. Funny thing was, she even had RSV during weeks 4-6, so I'm quite surprised she gained what she did.. As far as her clothes go, they don't for as snugly this week as they did last week, but it's still far better than it has been before. My son was FF and even he stayed in newborns for the first four months. I really do think she's just a slow gainer.





Now her old pedestrian? She would have had her in the hospital by a month. I hated that woman, and her new pediatrician I love so far. Yes, I know it seems drastic to put my daughter in the hospital over a few ounces, but I'm not complaining. I am not able to see first hand what I'm doing wrong. I'm not able to pump like I should at home, and even here in the hospital she's had more breastmilk than formula. She doesn't like it too much, and she's slowly gaining, so the nurses aren't pushing the formula issue. Besides, I'd really much rather be here than at home.






Quoting gdiamante:

Remembering that expected gain is 4-6 ounces a week...

Quoting aydensXmommy:

12 weeks. Birth weight was 8.3, lowest weight recorded was 7.3 at two weeks. 8.1 at five weeks,
Nearly a POUND? WHOA!
8.4 at six weeks,
And then a slowdown I would expect... remember, 4-6 ounces per week is the expected average gain.
8.12 at eight weeks,
Four ounces per week for this stretch.
8.14 two days after,
And ounce a day... overacheiving there...
9.2 at ten weeks,
Four ounces over ten days... slower than earlier ...
9.5 at eleven weeks,
And then three ounces in a week. The average over the period from 2 - 11 weeks was 3.66 ounces a week which is a tad low but not FTT low.
and now back to 9.2.
I have to ask... same scale?
Their concern is that she is in like the 3rd percentile
Percentiles don't matter with breastfed babies. Percentiles were created to meausre formula babies, not that they're valuable there either. All a percentile does is measure your baby against others of the same age... not really valuable info. There is an alternate chart for breastfed babies on kellymom.com.
and suddenly dropped after doing so well. I can tell she gained weight because her clothes were fitting much better in the past week. 
OK; that's a sign that MATTERS. Good luck!
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aydensXmommy
by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:30 AM
I am going to ask around for some good pediatric dentists. I asked him again if he was sure and he was just like, "I've been doing thus for forty years... There's nothing wrong with her." His "examination" wasn't nearly as thorough as the IBCLC.

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

I'm running on this same wavelength



Quoting IrishIz:

I'm going to be very honest with you...to the point that you may not like it.

Something is wrong in this picture and I'm not saying it is your daughter.

There is nothing that you posted that suggests failure to thrive.  She is at an appropriate weight with appropriate growth.  Being on a 3rd percent doesn't mean failure to thrive...that means that somebody has to be there in order for the growth chart to exist.  You know how you have the fat friend and the skinny friend...same thing with babies.  There has to be a fat baby and a skinny baby and a "regular" baby for that growth chart to exist.  That chart compares the weights and lengths of other babies.  It doesn't mean 3rd percent with some spot on there normal...it means 97% of kids weigh more than her.  Period.  That's it.  So your spot on the chart doesn't define anything important.

You made it clear you would rather be in the hospital.  Why?  What haven't you told us?  What is going on?

A hospital is a place where there are risks.  As soon as a healthy person enters the doors of the hospital their risk of disease and infection and complication increase.  Why do you want your daughter, with no obvious medical issues, there?  What is going on at home?

The tip/tongue tie...if the IBCLC is suspicious and the ENT saw something but doesn't think it effects breastfeeding...new ENT.  The ENT shouldn't be trying to determine if it effects breastfeeding when there are signs that it very well might be.  Find a new ENT or dentist or somebody who can do the clip.

What is going on that you want to be in the hospital?




Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
IrishIz
by Silver Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:35 AM
2 moms liked this

If you would rather be in the hospital with your healthy daughter...you need to find a way to change your living situation.

Breastfeeding...wanting to know exactly how much they are getting is a slippery slope that often leads to problems.  You pump, you bottle feed, baby doesn't latch, milk production suffers...that's the short story.  How much she is getting is evident in the fact that she is urinating and having bowel movements, meeting milestones and growing appropriately over a period of time (not day to day or week to week).

Seriously...if your insurance finds out she is in the hospital and healthy do you think they are going to be quick to pay the bill?  My sil and brother had their baby in the hospital.  Insurance determined he was in there longer than he needed to be.  Insurance WAS correct.  I told them early on that insurance might give them an issue.  Guess what...insurance said "hey this hospitalization wasn't okay" and paid for only a portion of the bill.  

You need to fix the problems at home...the hospital isn't the answer to your issues.

Quoting aydensXmommy:

There's nothing serious going on at home. Well, nothing that directly involves me, anyway. We have nine people in my house, and two if those people are going through problems if their own. I'm a person that would rather not deal with it if I'm not involved. I have so many responsibilities at home that aren't mine to deal with, and quite honestly, being here away from that has actually been quite nice. I am able to sleep, Abby is able to sleep, I'm able to pump way more here because I hardly can at home. I'd much rather her have my milk, I don't care how she gets it. Here, I'm able to do that. My son is in good hands while I'm gone (not at the house), so I don't have much to worry about. Here, I know exactly how much she is gaining. I have no clue at home. I'm just happy my baby girl is quite a lot happier the past day because it's actually been quiet.

Quoting mostlymaydays:

Twice you've mentioned that the hospital is a vacation compared to the drama at home. I have to ask if you're feeling threatened at home?




aydensXmommy
by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:37 AM
According to this, she scored a 42, highly likely to have a tongue tie. I'll definitely let my pediatrician/IBCLC know so we can find another ENT or dentist.

Quoting K8wizzo:

This.  From what I've read, lip tie/tongue tie ARE an issue and you need to be forceful to get someone to revise them.  Nothing is saying this is worth a hospital visit here except that you seem to be afraid to be at home.

Self Help



Tongue Tie Help    Latch Help

Is My Baby Tongue-tied?

Now that more mothers are breastfeeding, tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is on the forefront of medical research again. Some tongue-tied babies breastfeed without difficulty, others cause their mother pain, don't get enough milk, or have difficulty swallowing properly and are very unhappy during and after feeding.

If you are concerned that your baby may be tongue-tied, the following may help you decide if you need more help. An IBCLC (International Board Certified Lactation Consultant) can help with breastfeeding, and many different dentists and doctors can help if your baby needs treatment for tongue-tie. Seehttp://www.lowmilksupply.org/frenotomy.shtml for a list of doctors and dentists who are particularly good at diagnosing and treating tongue-tie.

The first thing to assess is whether your baby can stick out his or her tongue. If you touch your baby's lips, he will probably open his mouth. You can then touch the front of his lower gum with your fingertip. This makes him stick the tongue out. We want to see the tongue come out flat over the lip, without dipping down or pointing down. If your baby can only stick his tongue out when his mouth is closed, that can indicate a posterior (further back) tongue-tie.


Next, we want to see if your baby can lift her tongue way up to the roof of the mouth. All the way up is perfect, half way is enough for most babies to be able to breastfeed. Again, her mouth should be wide open. Most tongue-tied babies can only lift their tongues when their mouths are mostly closed.


Obvious and Sneakier Tongue-ties:

This baby (figure 3) has an obvious tongue-tie. You can see the membrane right at the front of the tongue, and you can see how it makes it hard for him to lift his tongue up.

figure 3

The baby in figure 4 is also tongue-tied. If you run your finger along the outside of a baby's lower gum, her tongue will try to follow. If the tongue twists like this, it's a sign of tongue-tie.

figure 4

The baby in figure 5 has a sneaky (posterior) tongue-tie. You can see that it is difficult to get a finger under the tongue. If you press on the front of the little membrane under the tongue (the frenulum), a tied tongue will pull down in the center like this. This shows that the frenulum is tight and does not allow the tongue to move well. This diagnostic trick is called the Murphy Maneuver after Dr. Jim Murphy of California.

figure 5

Figure 6 shows a very sneaky tongue-tie - a posterior or submucosal one. The frenulum (membrane holding the tongue down) is hiding behind the floor of the mouth (the oral mucosa). You can see that the tongue doesn't lift very well, and that the floor of the mouth is tented out a little.

figure 6
figure 7

Notice how when the baby in figure 6 tries to lift her tongue (figure 7), nothing at all is visible except the limited ability to lift the tongue up.

Again, some babies with posterior or submucosal tongue-tie can breastfeed, others have a lot of difficulty. Moms breast and nipple shape and milk supply can make things easier or more difficult for the baby.

The best way to diagnose a posterior tongue-tie is to lift the tongue with a grooved director. Doctors who treat tongue-tie usually have one.


The final thing to do is watch your baby cry. If only the edges of the tongue curl up like in figure 9, that's a sure sign that the frenulum is tight.

figure 9

Now that you have an idea whether your baby has normal tongue movement ability or not, you can decide what kind of help may be most useful.


You can also take the Tongue-tie symptom questionare at Dr. James Ochi's site http://www.BabyTongueTie.com

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

I'm running on this same wavelength



Quoting IrishIz:

I'm going to be very honest with you...to the point that you may not like it.

Something is wrong in this picture and I'm not saying it is your daughter.

There is nothing that you posted that suggests failure to thrive.  She is at an appropriate weight with appropriate growth.  Being on a 3rd percent doesn't mean failure to thrive...that means that somebody has to be there in order for the growth chart to exist.  You know how you have the fat friend and the skinny friend...same thing with babies.  There has to be a fat baby and a skinny baby and a "regular" baby for that growth chart to exist.  That chart compares the weights and lengths of other babies.  It doesn't mean 3rd percent with some spot on there normal...it means 97% of kids weigh more than her.  Period.  That's it.  So your spot on the chart doesn't define anything important.

You made it clear you would rather be in the hospital.  Why?  What haven't you told us?  What is going on?

A hospital is a place where there are risks.  As soon as a healthy person enters the doors of the hospital their risk of disease and infection and complication increase.  Why do you want your daughter, with no obvious medical issues, there?  What is going on at home?

The tip/tongue tie...if the IBCLC is suspicious and the ENT saw something but doesn't think it effects breastfeeding...new ENT.  The ENT shouldn't be trying to determine if it effects breastfeeding when there are signs that it very well might be.  Find a new ENT or dentist or somebody who can do the clip.

What is going on that you want to be in the hospital?





Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
aydensXmommy
by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:44 AM
I'm definitely aware that the hospital isn't the answer to my problems, but we're doing the best that we can to get out of that house. My husband is am over the road trucker and he's never home to help me out. It gets stressful to say the least. I am still breastfeeding, mainly because i don't want to stop, and she doesn't like formula. I'm not emptied whenever i nurse her, so I'm not doing it out of comfort or the be a human pacifier. She's putting out the appropriate diaper output, except in the past two days, as she's been sick. I don't care to eat when I'm sick, so i wouldn't expect her to be happy about it, either. She's made up for it since yesterday.

Quoting IrishIz:

If you would rather be in the hospital with your healthy daughter...you need to find a way to change your living situation.

Breastfeeding...wanting to know exactly how much they are getting is a slippery slope that often leads to problems.  You pump, you bottle feed, baby doesn't latch, milk production suffers...that's the short story.  How much she is getting is evident in the fact that she is urinating and having bowel movements, meeting milestones and growing appropriately over a period of time (not day to day or week to week).

Seriously...if your insurance finds out she is in the hospital and healthy do you think they are going to be quick to pay the bill?  My sil and brother had their baby in the hospital.  Insurance determined he was in there longer than he needed to be.  Insurance WAS correct.  I told them early on that insurance might give them an issue.  Guess what...insurance said "hey this hospitalization wasn't okay" and paid for only a portion of the bill.  

You need to fix the problems at home...the hospital isn't the answer to your issues.

Quoting aydensXmommy:

There's nothing serious going on at home. Well, nothing that directly involves me, anyway. We have nine people in my house, and two if those people are going through problems if their own. I'm a person that would rather not deal with it if I'm not involved. I have so many responsibilities at home that aren't mine to deal with, and quite honestly, being here away from that has actually been quite nice. I am able to sleep, Abby is able to sleep, I'm able to pump way more here because I hardly can at home. I'd much rather her have my milk, I don't care how she gets it. Here, I'm able to do that. My son is in good hands while I'm gone (not at the house), so I don't have much to worry about. Here, I know exactly how much she is gaining. I have no clue at home. I'm just happy my baby girl is quite a lot happier the past day because it's actually been quiet.



Quoting mostlymaydays:

Twice you've mentioned that the hospital is a vacation compared to the drama at home. I have to ask if you're feeling threatened at home?





Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:46 AM

I've had kids admitted to the hospital (not for ftt) and I know it is not something doctors typically do unless there is some legitimate worry. Room and board and nursing care runs about $1000 a day. The whole time we were in the hospital all I could think was "holy crap, what are they looking for? what do they think he has?" and I have never been more worried in my whole life, thinking my kid was going to get diagnosed with something life-threatening. 


You seriously need to find a place to live where you feel safe and happy and enjoy being in. Your home is where you go to be safe from the rest of the world. Your kids need that safe home-base, too. 

Quoting aydensXmommy:

There's nothing serious going on at home. Well, nothing that directly involves me, anyway. We have nine people in my house, and two if those people are going through problems if their own. I'm a person that would rather not deal with it if I'm not involved. I have so many responsibilities at home that aren't mine to deal with, and quite honestly, being here away from that has actually been quite nice. I am able to sleep, Abby is able to sleep, I'm able to pump way more here because I hardly can at home. I'd much rather her have my milk, I don't care how she gets it. Here, I'm able to do that. My son is in good hands while I'm gone (not at the house), so I don't have much to worry about. Here, I know exactly how much she is gaining. I have no clue at home. I'm just happy my baby girl is quite a lot happier the past day because it's actually been quiet.

Quoting mostlymaydays:




IrishIz
by Silver Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:50 AM
2 moms liked this

So how long do you plan to stay?  How long do they hope to keep her?  You are just increasing her chances of getting sick and increasing chances that they will find something "wrong" that will hurt the breastfeeding relationship.

Why do you live where you live?  What is stopping you from getting an apartment for your family?  I know it might make finances tight but tight finances is better than it being so bad you would rather be away from your son and in a hospital.  Truckers make okay money right?  Where is the pay going?  It needs to be going towards you moving out!

Quoting aydensXmommy:

I'm definitely aware that the hospital isn't the answer to my problems, but we're doing the best that we can to get out of that house. My husband is am over the road trucker and he's never home to help me out. It gets stressful to say the least. I am still breastfeeding, mainly because i don't want to stop, and she doesn't like formula. I'm not emptied whenever i nurse her, so I'm not doing it out of comfort or the be a human pacifier. She's putting out the appropriate diaper output, except in the past two days, as she's been sick. I don't care to eat when I'm sick, so i wouldn't expect her to be happy about it, either. She's made up for it since yesterday.

Quoting IrishIz:

If you would rather be in the hospital with your healthy daughter...you need to find a way to change your living situation.

Breastfeeding...wanting to know exactly how much they are getting is a slippery slope that often leads to problems.  You pump, you bottle feed, baby doesn't latch, milk production suffers...that's the short story.  How much she is getting is evident in the fact that she is urinating and having bowel movements, meeting milestones and growing appropriately over a period of time (not day to day or week to week).

Seriously...if your insurance finds out she is in the hospital and healthy do you think they are going to be quick to pay the bill?  My sil and brother had their baby in the hospital.  Insurance determined he was in there longer than he needed to be.  Insurance WAS correct.  I told them early on that insurance might give them an issue.  Guess what...insurance said "hey this hospitalization wasn't okay" and paid for only a portion of the bill.  

You need to fix the problems at home...the hospital isn't the answer to your issues.

Quoting aydensXmommy:

There's nothing serious going on at home. Well, nothing that directly involves me, anyway. We have nine people in my house, and two if those people are going through problems if their own. I'm a person that would rather not deal with it if I'm not involved. I have so many responsibilities at home that aren't mine to deal with, and quite honestly, being here away from that has actually been quite nice. I am able to sleep, Abby is able to sleep, I'm able to pump way more here because I hardly can at home. I'd much rather her have my milk, I don't care how she gets it. Here, I'm able to do that. My son is in good hands while I'm gone (not at the house), so I don't have much to worry about. Here, I know exactly how much she is gaining. I have no clue at home. I'm just happy my baby girl is quite a lot happier the past day because it's actually been quiet.



Quoting mostlymaydays:

Twice you've mentioned that the hospital is a vacation compared to the drama at home. I have to ask if you're feeling threatened at home?






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