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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

What do I do?

Posted by on Feb. 17, 2013 at 11:07 AM
  • 7 Replies
My baby is 3 days old. Day 1 she really didn't nurse much at all... Kept offering she just wasn't having it. Day 2 she nursed better, she just won't latch. Once she finally does (which can take hours) she has a good latch. But it's nearly impossible to get her to start. I've tried pumping and only get a few drops, but I am leaking some and getting engorged with my milk coming in. Anyways I don't want to supplement and I'm not getting anything from a pump but I can't get her to eat now. She did pretty well last night-
Ate 12:45am for 14 min one side and had a wet diaper
1:30am ate 16 min the other side
1:55 wet
2:30 wet
2:45 ate 13 min one side
Then she would not wake up/eat until 7:45am and ate 10 min then
Then 8:45 10 min again
I've been trying/offering a ton since then but she just won't wake up. I've gotten her undressed, tried burping her, etc. she last was wet at 2:30 it's now 11. Her only poo yesterday was 12:45am
Help!
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by on Feb. 17, 2013 at 11:07 AM
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Replies (1-7):
mama-smurf
by Felisha on Feb. 17, 2013 at 11:15 AM
My daughter was like that in the first couple if says. Whatever nurses says no schedule feed on demand and do not supplement. Just keep offering breast. My daughter went hours without eating, fell asleep and nursed for 10 minutes. When nursing don't bundle her. It may seem tough but you will get through it. Just nurse in demand. If she is hungry she will eat. Their tummies are very small.
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luvmylilbean
by on Feb. 17, 2013 at 11:25 AM
Is the lack of nursing going to hurt my establishing a supply? Also she was a little jaundice when we left the hospital and I can see some yellow so I'm concerned it will get worse.

Quoting mama-smurf:

My daughter was like that in the first couple if says. Whatever nurses says no schedule feed on demand and do not supplement. Just keep offering breast. My daughter went hours without eating, fell asleep and nursed for 10 minutes. When nursing don't bundle her. It may seem tough but you will get through it. Just nurse in demand. If she is hungry she will eat. Their tummies are very small.
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shortyali
by Alicia on Feb. 17, 2013 at 12:01 PM
When jaundice is a factor you need to get her to nurse every 2 hours or so. Strip her down to just diaper and use a washcloth if needed to wake her up to eat. I do this with all of my babies until they are back up to birth weight. Usually the first 2 weeks or so.
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Zazayam
by Nicki on Feb. 17, 2013 at 12:18 PM

Try to have as much skin-to-skin contact as you can while nursing, and yeah don't bundle her up when you're trying to feed her. Can also squeeze a little milk into her mouth to get her interest.

Unless your pump is nicer then mine I'd put it aside for now, mine sucks and is a very unpleasant experience and you should try to be as relaxed and comfortable as you can. Avoid formula and just offer your breast every chance you get.

Good luck, and it'll be fine - don't stress out about it :)

catholicmamamia
by on Feb. 18, 2013 at 12:27 AM

How often should baby be nursing?

Frequent nursing encourages good milk supply and reduces engorgement. Aim for nursing at least 10 – 12 times per day (24 hours). You CAN’T nurse too often–you CAN nurse too little.

Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)–don’t wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy at first–wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing.

Is baby getting enough milk?

Weight gain: Normal newborns may lose up to 7% of birth weight in the first few days. After mom’s milk comes in, the average breastfed baby gains 6 oz/week (170 g/week). Take baby for a weight check at the end of the first week or beginning of the second week. Consult with baby’s doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

Dirty diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one dirty diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). After day 4, stools should be yellow and baby should have at least 3-4 stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often–this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy.

Wet diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one wet diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). Once mom’s milk comes in, expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet.

Breast changes

Your milk should start to “come in” (increase in quantity and change from colostrum to mature milk) between days 2 and 5. To minimize engorgement: nurse often, don’t skip feedings (even at night), ensure good latch/positioning, and let baby finish the first breast before offering the other side. To decrease discomfort from engorgement, use cold and/or cabbage leaf compresses between feedings. If baby is having trouble latching due to engorgement, use reverse pressure softening or express milk until the nipple is soft, then try latching again.

Call your doctor, midwife and/or lactation consultant if:

  • Baby is having no wet or dirty diapers
  • Baby has dark colored urine after day 3(should be pale yellow to clear)
  • Baby has dark colored stools after day 4(should be mustard yellow, with no meconium)
  • Baby has fewer wet/soiled diapers or nurses less frequently than the goals listed here
  • Mom has symptoms of mastitis (sore breast with fever, chills, flu-like aching)

Weeks two through six

How often should baby be nursing?

Frequent nursing in the early weeks is important for establishing a good milk supply. Most newborns need to nurse 8 – 12+ times per day (24 hours). You CAN’T nurse too often—you CAN nurse too little.

Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)—don’t wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy - wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing. Once baby has established a good weight gain pattern, you can stop waking baby and nurse on baby’s cues alone.

The following things are normal:

  • Frequent and/or long feedings.
  • Varying nursing pattern from day to day.
  • Cluster nursing (very frequent to constant nursing) for several hours—usually evenings—each day. This may coincide with the normal “fussy time” that most babies have in the early months.
  • Growth spurts, where baby nurses more often than usual for several days and may act very fussy. Common growth spurt times in the early weeks are the first few days at home, 7 – 10 days, 2 – 3 weeks and 4 – 6 weeks.

Is baby getting enough milk?

Weight gain: The average breastfed newborn gains 6 ounces/week (170 grams/week). Consult with baby’s doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

Dirty diapers: Expect 3-4+ stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often–this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is yellow and loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy. After 4 – 6 weeks, some babies stool less frequently, with stools as infrequent as one every 7-10 days. As long as baby is gaining well, this is normal.

Wet diapers: Expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet. After 6 weeks, wet diapers may drop to 4-5/day but amount of urine will increase to 4-6+ tablespoons (60-90+ mL) as baby’s bladder capacity grows.

Milk supply?

Some moms worry about milk supply. As long as baby is gaining well on mom’s milk alone, then milk supply is good. Between weight checks, a sufficient number of wet and dirty diapers will indicate that baby is getting enough milk.


http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing/



                
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MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on Feb. 18, 2013 at 7:49 AM
Lay topless in the bed with baby in her diaper. Every 2 hours or every time she moves try to latch her
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K8wizzo
by Kate on Feb. 18, 2013 at 9:15 AM

This.  Skin to skin with her on your chest will make her want to nurse.

Quoting MommyO2-6631:

Lay topless in the bed with baby in her diaper. Every 2 hours or every time she moves try to latch her


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