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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Breastfeeding1 week old....

Posted by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:26 PM
  • 17 Replies
And I feel like a cow! I was told to throw out all clocks and feed when baby is hungry. It's been working fine it just seems so often. She sleeps in between feelings but when she wakes up she may do 15 mins on one breast then 15 on the other. Then she comes off and burps and then about 10 mins later she wants to do it again. Then she will fall asleep right after. Once she wakes up we're at it again. Also, when she's awake and full she just cries. She won't just sit and be content. I believe she's full because she eats quite a bit. She doesn't like her bouncy seat, she doesn't get soothed by rocking, music, walking, talking, pacifier, or laying. Swaddling was suggested yesterday and I've been trying it today. It seems to help with putting her to sleep but she still has her crying spells in between. Idk if this has anything to do with BF or not but I do feel overwhelmed with both.
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by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:26 PM
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stepconfused182
by Kelley on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:33 PM
Read Dr Sears info on high needs babies and see if that helps you at all. You are describing my life for the first 8 weeks of my daughters life. Your daughters nursing activity is perfectly normal as she is establishing your supply. Keep nursing on demand. Cosleeping also saved my sanity. Good luck and congrats! :)
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Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:34 PM

Offer to nurse every time she cries, even if she's just eaten. Babies tummies are tiny, like a marble and get fulll, and empty quickly. Also you may feel like she's getting plenty but in reality, there is no sure fire way to know how much she's getting in those 30 minutes it could be less than an ounce. All babies do for the first 6-8 weeks is nurse. It's completely normal, and she's building your supply. Also babies should not be introduced to a paci until at least 6 weeks. Hang in there mama, it will get easier. :-)

slovette
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:34 PM
Where can I find that to read? Is it a book or something on here?


Quoting stepconfused182:

Read Dr Sears info on high needs babies and see if that helps you at all. You are describing my life for the first 8 weeks of my daughters life. Your daughters nursing activity is perfectly normal as she is establishing your supply. Keep nursing on demand. Cosleeping also saved my sanity. Good luck and congrats! :)

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ceckyl
by Kyla on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:34 PM
2 moms liked this
Babies should pretty well be in the breast 24/7 for the first 6 weeks. Let her comfort nurse. Don't assume she's 'full' because she just ate.
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FebPenguins
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:43 PM

Is she cold? Is she hot? My daughter REFUSED to be wraped in blankets and she was born in March (we live in MI) so it was still cold. Day 3 we realized 70 degrees was just too hot for her. "they" tell you to keep baby warm, well, my dd had no problem keeping warm!!

Are the lights too bright? Does she have an itch? Have you done bath yet? I would try doing more skin to skin, she is not too old for that yet. Do you wear perfume or light candles, maybe too much smell for baby. Can dad/grandma hold baby while fussy? Sometimes baby feels your stress and thinks there is something for them to be upset over.

I would suggest you cut all dairy out of your diet. "they" say it doesn't effect baby, but I swear it did my oldest, and I cannot eat cheese right now b/c 6mth old gets gassy.

Just a few more ideas. Try to be patient  (and place baby in safe place and give yourself five in another room if necessary!)  and remember baby is getting use to being here in the world.

stepconfused182
by Kelley on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:58 PM
If you google his name and high needs babies you will see tons of information. Reading it and understanding my dd better and knowing I wasn't the only one who had a child who did nothing but cry when she wasn't sleepIng or eating made me feel unbelievably better. Dr Sears had several moms of his patients describe a baby like this and didn't fully understand until his fourth (I think) child came along and she was a high needs baby. He has published all kinds of info on it and it's extremely helpful.

Quoting slovette:

Where can I find that to read? Is it a book or something on here?




Quoting stepconfused182:

Read Dr Sears info on high needs babies and see if that helps you at all. You are describing my life for the first 8 weeks of my daughters life. Your daughters nursing activity is perfectly normal as she is establishing your supply. Keep nursing on demand. Cosleeping also saved my sanity. Good luck and congrats! :)

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K8wizzo
by Kate on Feb. 21, 2013 at 8:58 PM

Does this sound familiar?

Forceful Let-down (Milk Ejection Reflex) & Oversupply

AUGUST 20, 2011. Posted in: SUPPLY WORRIES

By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

 Is forceful let-down the problem?

Does your baby do any of these things?

  • Gag, choke, strangle, gulp, gasp, cough while nursing as though the milk is coming too fast
  • Pull off the breast often while nursing
  • Clamp down on the nipple at let-down to slow the flow of milk
  • Make a clicking sound when nursing
  • Spit up very often and/or tend to be very gassy
  • Periodically refuse to nurse
  • Dislike comfort nursing in general

If some of this sounds familiar to you, you probably have a forceful let-down. This is often associated with too much milk (oversupply). Some mothers notice that the problems with fast letdown or oversupply don’t start until 3-6 weeks of age. Forceful let-down runs the gamut from a minor inconvenience to a major problem, depending upon how severe it is and how it affects the nursing relationship.

What can I do about it?

There are essentially two ways you can go about remedying a forceful let-down: (1) help baby deal with the fast flow and (2) take measures to adjust your milk supply down to baby’s needs. Since forceful let-down is generally a byproduct of oversupply, most moms will be working on both of these things. It may take a couple of weeks to see results from interventions for oversupply, so try to be patient and keep working on it.

Help baby deal with the fast milk flow

  • Position baby so that she is nursing “uphill” in relation to mom’s breast, where gravity is working againstthe flow of milk. The most effective positions are those where baby’s head and throat are above the level of your nipple. Some nursing positions to try:
    • Cradle hold, but with mom leaning back (a recliner or lots of pillows helps)
    • Football hold, but with mom leaning back
    • Elevated football hold – like the football hold, but baby is sitting up and facing mom to nurse instead of lying down (good for nursing in public).
    • Side lying position – this allows baby to dribble the extra milk out of her mouth when it’s coming too fast
    • Australian position (mom is “down under”, aka posture feeding) – in this position, mom is lying on her back and baby is on top (facing down), tummy to tummy with mom. Avoid using this positioning frequently, as it may lead to plugged ducts.
  • Burp baby frequently if she is swallowing a lot of air.
  • Nurse more frequently. This will reduce the amount of milk that accumulates between feedings, so feedings are more manageable for baby.
  • Nurse when baby is sleepy and relaxed. Baby will suck more gently at this time, and the milk flow will be slower.
  • Wait until let-down occurs, then take baby off the breast while at the same time catching the milk in a towel or cloth diaper. Once the flow slows, you can put your baby back to the breast.
  • Pump or hand express until the flow of milk slows down, and then put baby to the breast. Use this only if nothing else is working, as it stimulates additional milk production. If you do this, try to express a little less milk each time until you are no longer expressing before nursing.

Adjust your supply to better match baby’s needs

  • If baby is gaining weight well, then having baby nurse from only one breast per feeding can be helpful.
  • If baby finishes nursing on the first side and wants to continue nursing, just put baby back onto the first side.
  • If the second side becomes uncomfortable, express a little milk until you’re more comfortable and then use cool compresses – aim for expressing less milk each time until you are comfortable without expressing milk.
  • Avoid extra breast stimulation, for example, unnecessary pumping, running the shower on your breasts for a long time or wearing breast shells.
  • Between feedings, try applying cool compresses to the breast (on for 30 minutes, off for at least an hour). This can discourage blood flow and milk production.
  • If nursing one side per feeding is not working after a week or so, try keeping baby to one side for a certain period of time before switching sides. This is called block nursing.
  • Start with 2-3 hours and increase in half-hour increments if needed.
  • Do not restrict nursing at all, but any time that baby needs to nurse simply keep putting baby back to the same side during that time period.
  • If the second side becomes uncomfortable, express a little milk until you’re more comfortable and then use cool compresses – aim for expressing less milk each time until you are comfortable without expressing milk.
  • In more extreme cases, mom may need to experiment a bit with time periods over 4 hours to find the amount of time per breast that works best.
  • Additional measures that should only be used for extreme cases of oversupply include cabbage leaf compresses and herbs.

Even if these measures do not completely solve the problem, many moms find that their abundant supply and fast let-down will subside, at least to some extent, by about 12 weeks (give or take a bit). At this point, hormonal changes occur that make milk supply more stable and more in line with the amount of milk that baby needs.

Sometimes babies of moms with oversupply or fast let-down get very used to the fast flow and object when it normally slows somewhere between 3 weeks to 3 months. Even though your let-down may not be truly slow, it can still seem that way to baby. See Let-down Reflex: Too Slow?for tips.

babydue1105
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 9:01 PM
My DD did this a lot, she would "cluster feed" everytime she had the slightest growth spurt. I would take her off the breast and she would cry until I put her back on. We had a marathon of 8 hours once uggghh its tough...hang in there momma it gets easier. Im stillat it and she is 16 months today. Your doing great!!! Google cluster feeds it will give you some insight.
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slovette
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 9:20 PM
I know about the paci but the crying was so much that I got desperate. I keep trying but she will only suck it for a little bit and then spit it out nsomitndoesnt really soothe her. Like u said every time she cries I nurse her. And she takes it every time. May not always be a long time but she will take it. But after she's done....she starts crying. The nursing all the time doesn't bother me as much as the crying. I mean even her pediatrician said that her belly button is going to be an outie because she strains so much crying all the time.


Quoting Cruz-s-mommy:

Offer to nurse every time she cries, even if she's just eaten. Babies tummies are tiny, like a marble and get fulll, and empty quickly. Also you may feel like she's getting plenty but in reality, there is no sure fire way to know how much she's getting in those 30 minutes it could be less than an ounce. All babies do for the first 6-8 weeks is nurse. It's completely normal, and she's building your supply. Also babies should not be introduced to a paci until at least 6 weeks. Hang in there mama, it will get easier. :-)


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slovette
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 9:21 PM
Ok, I'll try more nursing. I was assuming if she started crying 5 mins after I fed her, that she wasn't hungry.


Quoting ceckyl:

Babies should pretty well be in the breast 24/7 for the first 6 weeks. Let her comfort nurse. Don't assume she's 'full' because she just ate.

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