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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Back to work and worried I can't keep up with DDs needs

Posted by on Mar. 5, 2013 at 7:21 PM
  • 23 Replies
My daughter was 3 mos Friday and I went back to work yesterday. She is Ebf and I knew she was a piggie cause she is always on the boob. Well I work 8 hours, I feed her in the am pump 2-3 oz after twice at work for a total of 9-10 oz and room ad I'm home breadtfeed. Well she burned through the 13 oz that was in the fridge today while I was at work:( I thought I was doing good but then I see wow she needs prob 15 while I'm gone but doesn't that seem like slot. She is only about 11 lbs, could it be a growth spurt? I'm just afraid I won't keep up, my job will only a lot for 2 sessions every 3 hours I can't pump more often? I pump right before I walk out the door after feeding and then she eats as soon as I get home? Suggestions? Thanks
by on Mar. 5, 2013 at 7:21 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Sunflower_rn
by on Mar. 5, 2013 at 7:24 PM
Oh I also pump at night before we go to bed but I don't get but about an oz cause she eats for Like an hour straight then sleeps til the am when I wake her to feed her.
MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Mar. 5, 2013 at 7:41 PM
2 moms liked this
She only needs 1-1.5 ounces for each hour you're separated. It should be fed every 2-3 hours in bottles no mote than three ounces each, baby held sitting upright with bottle parallel to flit. Burp after each ounce. More than that is overfeeding. The idea is that bottle is famine, breast is feast.
MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Mar. 5, 2013 at 7:42 PM
2 moms liked this
Kellymom.com has an article on bottlefeeding the breastfed baby. Print a copy for your caregivers.
mamabens
by Miranda on Mar. 5, 2013 at 7:49 PM

This, no way does she need more. 

Quoting MusherMaggie:

She only needs 1-1.5 ounces for each hour you're separated. It should be fed every 2-3 hours in bottles no mote than three ounces each, baby held sitting upright with bottle parallel to flit. Burp after each ounce. More than that is overfeeding. The idea is that bottle is famine, breast is feast.


 BabyFruit Ticker


bebe_ju-rah
by on Mar. 5, 2013 at 7:54 PM
I was afraid of this BC when I left my ds with dh he blew through 2oz in 15 mins and wanted more. He's been with the nanny for 2 days now and he eats 2 ozs every 3 hrs (he's 7 weeks). Maybe whoever is watching her should consider trying to soothe her in other ways besides feeding?
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Baby_Avas_Momma
by Gold Member on Mar. 5, 2013 at 8:11 PM
For an 8hr day, baby needs no more than 8-10oz. Whoever is watching her needs to learn how to properly bottle feed a breastfed baby (Kellymom.com has a great article) and they need to find other ways of comforting her that doesn't involve feeding.
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audmom1218
by Silver Member on Mar. 5, 2013 at 8:29 PM

What everyone else said.  We usually left less than 1 oz/hr becuase I would nurse right before I left and as soon as I got back.  This was our typical schedule:

7am drop off (nurse)

9am 2oz bottle

11am 2oz bottle

1pm 2 oz bottle 

3:30/4pm I was back, nurse.  So for an 8.5-9hr day I left 6oz.  It worked so much better once we set the schedule.  My In laws were just assuming she was hungry cuz she would keep eating ifyou offered more.  But the fact is babies need to suck for comfort.  And when they suck on a bottle they get more out.  Bottles need to be slowly given (2oz should take 15 -20 min for baby to finish).  Burp after every ounce, bottle held paralel to fhe floor. In between bottles we allowed a pacifier to allow DD to suck while not overfeeding.   

MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on Mar. 5, 2013 at 9:18 PM
You need to make it very clear that bottles larger than 3 oz are not allowed and 3 oz should last at least 2.5-3 hours. In between offer a paci or keep her occupied other ways. The logic is that breastfed babies drink between 24-32 oz of milk a day. Divide that by hours in a day and you get 1-1.25 oz an hour. Therefore baby does not need more than that while you are away or she is being overfed. Kellymom.com is a great resource on the subject.
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maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Mar. 5, 2013 at 9:21 PM

From 

Returning to Work: The Breastfeeding Mother’s Guide

How much milk will my baby need while I’m away?

Breastfed babies need, on average, 24 to 32 ounces of milk per day (Kent et al., 2006). If you spread that amount over a full day it equals 1-1.25 ounces per hour. With that information in mind, plan on leaving about 1-1.25 ounces of milk for each hour of separation. Most breastfed babies need no more than 2-4 ounces at each feeding (Kent et al., 2006). Breastfed babies need less milk than formula-fed babies do, and unlike with formula, the amount of breastmilk your baby needs does not increase as he grows bigger. When you return to work, your baby will need only a portion of this daily amount of milk from the care provider, because he will still be getting much of it by breastfeeding during the hours of the day and night when you are together.


Offering smaller bottles, of no more than 2-4 ounces, means there is a smaller chance that your baby will not finish his bottle and leave milk that must be thrown away bylicensed daycares. 
What if my baby’s caregiver says my baby needs more milk?

With bottle-feeding, there can be a tendency for the person feeding to encourage the baby to finish the bottle. Milk flows easily from a bottle nipple, even when the baby is not actively sucking, and the faster flow can cause a baby to continue feeding after he is full. Caregivers may believe that a baby needs more milk than he actually does, and many childcare workers are accustomed to the larger amounts of formula they feed many babies. Make sure that your caregiver has the correct information about how much breastmilk a baby needs and understands the difference between bottle-feeding breastmilk and formula. 

You can offer some tips to your baby’s caregiver on how to bottle feed in a way that supports breastfeeding:
  • Use a slow-flow soft bottle nipple that has a wide base and a shorter, round nipple (not the flatter, orthodontic kind).
  • Start by resting the tip of the nipple on the baby's upper lip and allow him to take it into his mouth himself, as if he were nursing.
  • Keep the bottle only slightly tilted, with the baby in a more upright position, so he has to work to get the milk out. If you hold the bottle straight down, the milk will come out too fast, and he may feel overwhelmed by the flow (Kassing, 2002).
Sunflower_rn
by on Mar. 6, 2013 at 5:27 AM
Now that I do the math we are not far off I am away close to 9 1/2-10 hrs due to commute. She sleeps 7-10 hrs a night she does not sleep but maybe can hour during the day, she is not textbook. So at 14 oz yesterday she was at a little over an ounce and a half an hour, she had No trouble nursing when she i got home ;) she had had a 2 oz bottle before I had gotten home then nursed for about 30 minutes. Putting her on a schedule isn't an option because I do not have a set schedule today I had to wake her up to nurse at 5 am, yesterday we didn't get up til 630. My hours vary day to day and my priority is her nursing from me obviously. So I need to basically have 10-12 oz available daily. My husband also brought up my first day back she only took 8 oz while I was gone, and this is my first few days back. Both dh and the nanny know no more than a 3 oz bottle every 2-3 hours with an average of around an oz an hour.
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