Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Pumping moms!!

Posted by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:23 AM
  • 7 Replies
I pump twice a day for dd's cereal and always freeze some incase of an emergency. I'm planning on going out for a little while this weekend and don't know how much to give her in a bottle. She's 8 months old.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:23 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-7):
audmom1218
by Gold Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:27 AM
1 mom liked this
2oz-3oz bottles, no more than 1-1.25 oz per hour your way. (It gone 4 hrs absolutely no more than 4-5oz)
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
stepconfused182
by Kelley on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:27 AM
1 mom liked this

 No more than 3 oz at a time. How long are you planning on being gone?

Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:31 AM
1 mom liked this
1-1.25 per hour of seperstion in bottles no larger than 3 ounnces.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
kbutton24
by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:32 AM
No more than 5 hours.

Quoting stepconfused182:

 No more than 3 oz at a time. How long are you planning on being gone?

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
maggiemom2000
by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:51 AM

Nurse before you leave, leave one 3 ounce bottle to be given 2-3 hours afer you have left, then nurse when you get back!

Info for the babysitter on how to give the bottle:

With bottle-feeding, there can be a tendency for the person feeding to encourage the baby to finish the bottle. Milk flows easily from a bottle nipple, even when the baby is not actively sucking, and the faster flow can cause a baby to continue feeding after he is full. Caregivers may believe that a baby needs more milk than he actually does, and many childcare workers are accustomed to the larger amounts of formula they feed many babies. Make sure that your caregiver has the correct information about how much breastmilk a baby needs and understands the difference between bottle-feeding breastmilk and formula. 

You can offer some tips to your baby’s caregiver on how to bottle feed in a way that supports breastfeeding:

  • Use a slow-flow soft bottle nipple that has a wide base and a shorter, round nipple (not the flatter, orthodontic kind).
  • Start by resting the tip of the nipple on the baby's upper lip and allow him to take it into his mouth himself, as if he were nursing.
  • Keep the bottle only slightly tilted, with the baby in a more upright position, so he has to work to get the milk out. If you hold the bottle straight down, the milk will come out too fast, and he may feel overwhelmed by the flow (Kassing, 2002).
Quoting kbutton24:

No more than 5 hours.

Quoting stepconfused182:

 No more than 3 oz at a time. How long are you planning on being gone?


kbutton24
by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 10:55 AM
Thanks for the info! She'll be with df while I'm gone. We have yet to use a babysitter. I'm a little nutty and don't trust anyone with my baby!

Quoting maggiemom2000:

Nurse before you leave, leave one 3 ounce bottle to be given 2-3 hours afer you have left, then nurse when you get back!

Info for the babysitter on how to give the bottle:

With bottle-feeding, there can be a tendency for the person feeding to encourage the baby to finish the bottle. Milk flows easily from a bottle nipple, even when the baby is not actively sucking, and the faster flow can cause a baby to continue feeding after he is full. Caregivers may believe that a baby needs more milk than he actually does, and many childcare workers are accustomed to the larger amounts of formula they feed many babies. Make sure that your caregiver has the correct information about how much breastmilk a baby needs and understands the difference between bottle-feeding breastmilk and formula. 

You can offer some tips to your baby’s caregiver on how to bottle feed in a way that supports breastfeeding:

  • Use a slow-flow soft bottle nipple that has a wide base and a shorter, round nipple (not the flatter, orthodontic kind).
  • Start by resting the tip of the nipple on the baby's upper lip and allow him to take it into his mouth himself, as if he were nursing.
  • Keep the bottle only slightly tilted, with the baby in a more upright position, so he has to work to get the milk out. If you hold the bottle straight down, the milk will come out too fast, and he may feel overwhelmed by the flow (Kassing, 2002).
Quoting kbutton24:

No more than 5 hours.



Quoting stepconfused182:

 No more than 3 oz at a time. How long are you planning on being gone?


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
stepconfused182
by Kelley on Mar. 8, 2013 at 11:24 AM
1 mom liked this

 I'm a little nutty too ;)

Definitely what maggiemom said. She will only need one 3oz bottle if you nurse right before you leave.

Quoting kbutton24:

Thanks for the info! She'll be with df while I'm gone. We have yet to use a babysitter. I'm a little nutty and don't trust anyone with my baby!

Quoting maggiemom2000:

Nurse before you leave, leave one 3 ounce bottle to be given 2-3 hours afer you have left, then nurse when you get back!

Info for the babysitter on how to give the bottle:

With bottle-feeding, there can be a tendency for the person feeding to encourage the baby to finish the bottle. Milk flows easily from a bottle nipple, even when the baby is not actively sucking, and the faster flow can cause a baby to continue feeding after he is full. Caregivers may believe that a baby needs more milk than he actually does, and many childcare workers are accustomed to the larger amounts of formula they feed many babies. Make sure that your caregiver has the correct information about how much breastmilk a baby needs and understands the difference between bottle-feeding breastmilk and formula. 

You can offer some tips to your baby’s caregiver on how to bottle feed in a way that supports breastfeeding:

  • Use a slow-flow soft bottle nipple that has a wide base and a shorter, round nipple (not the flatter, orthodontic kind).
  • Start by resting the tip of the nipple on the baby's upper lip and allow him to take it into his mouth himself, as if he were nursing.
  • Keep the bottle only slightly tilted, with the baby in a more upright position, so he has to work to get the milk out. If you hold the bottle straight down, the milk will come out too fast, and he may feel overwhelmed by the flow (Kassing, 2002).
Quoting kbutton24:

No more than 5 hours.



Quoting stepconfused182:

 No more than 3 oz at a time. How long are you planning on being gone?


 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)