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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Help me make it work this time!!!

Posted by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 12:51 AM
  • 10 Replies

Hi mommas. I am currently pregnant with my DH and i's second baby. I am an avid supporter for breasting but did not have a successful experience with my DD.

Long story short i was only 19 and very uninformed about it. I assumed that it was pretty simple and basic but my ignorance caused a lot of issues when it came to breast feeding. Since i had a c section my milk didnt come in until 4 days after my DD was born. In the hospital the forced us to supplement with formula despite my absolute insistence on breastfeeding.They told me that nipple confuse was an old wives tale and assured me that everything would be fine and that i was killing my baby by my lack of supply and so i caved.

I am now much older and much wiser from the experience but having not been able to do it personally i want to here some of your lovely ladies suggestions, tips, and tricks for successfull breast feeding.

Some questions i do have in specific are

When did you start pumping? before or after baby?

how much should you pump/feed?

what is the best kind of breast pump?

Tricks for getting them to latch?


Thanks any answers would be would be helpful


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by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 12:51 AM
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Replies (1-10):
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Mar. 23, 2013 at 12:56 AM


Quoting villagemamma:

 Since i had a c section my milk didnt come in until 4 days after my DD was born.

It normally takes up to a week, even without a c-section.

In the hospital the forced us to supplement with formula despite my absolute insistence on breastfeeding.

Hope you're going to another hospital. Or to a barn.

They told me that nipple confuse was an old wives tale and assured me that everything would be fine and that i was killing my baby by my lack of supply and so i caved.

I am now much older and much wiser from the experience but having not been able to do it personally i want to here some of your lovely ladies suggestions, tips, and tricks for successfull breast feeding.

Some questions i do have in specific are

When did you start pumping? before or after baby?

After. There's no point to doing so before.. And if you're not working or going to be away from baby, don't bother. It's merely more work.

how much should you pump/feed?

Feed ON DEMAND. As often as baby wants. If you're going to be away from baby, pump one side whilke nursing the other once a day oin the AM. Takes NOTHING from baby!

what is the best kind of breast pump?

Depends on your need. SAHM? No pump needed, but if you really want one Avent Isis is fine. Working mom? Hygeia Enjoye or Ameda Purely Yours.

Tricks for getting them to latch?

Latching and Positioning Resources

AUGUST 29, 2011. Posted in: BREASTFEEDING BASICS

No matter what latch and positioning look like, the true measure is in the answers to these two questions:

  1. Is it effective?
  2. Is it comfortable?

Even if latch and positioning look perfect (and, yes, even if a lactation consultant told you they were fine), pain and/or ineffective milk transfer indicate that there is a problem somewhere, and the first suspect is ineffective latch/positioning.

If baby is transferring milk and gaining weight well, and mom is not hurting, then latch and positioning are – by definition – good, even if it’s nothing like the “textbook” latch and positioning that you’ve seen in books.

“Rules and regulations have no place in the mother-baby relationship. Each mother and baby dyad is different and what works well for one mother and baby may not work well for another mother and baby. The important thing to do is to look at the mother and baby as individuals.”– Andrea Eastman, MA, CCE, IBCLC in The Mother-Baby Dance

Following are some of my favorite resources on latch and positioning:

Biological Nurturing: Laid-Back Breastfeeding from Dr. Suzanne Colson. Breastfeeding in a semi-reclined position can be very helpful for both mom and baby.

Newborn Hands: Why are they always in the way while breastfeeding? from the San Diego Breastfeeding Center

Latching handouts by Diane Wiessinger, MS, IBCLC

Breastfeeding: Off to the best start from the UK Department of Health
(Lovely latching pictures here, with simple directions.)

Deep Latch Technique from The Pump Station.
(Good latching pictures and directions.)

When Latching by Anne J. Barnes, has instructions with drawings
(The drawings and tips here are helpful.)

Latching videos by Dr. Jack Newman

Animation illustrating assymetrical latch technique by Victoria Nesterova
(Nice animation — text is in Russian.)

The Mother-Baby Dance: Positioning and Latch-On by Andrea Eastman, MA, CCE, IBCLC
(This is a longish article written for breastfeeding counselors that has some nice descriptions of latching and positioning, along with info on why some things tend to work better than others.)

Is baby latching on and sucking efficiently? How to tell from AskDrSears.com
(A useful list.)

L-A-T-C-H-E-S * Breastfeeding Assessment Tool (for the first 4 weeks) and Scoring Key by Marie Davis, RN, IBCLC
(A tool for professionals that could also be useful for moms who are wondering if breastfeeding is going fine and whether additional help is needed.)

Help for various nursing positions

Lactation yoga, or side-lying nursing without getting up to switch sides by Eva Lyford, @ 

Nursing Laying Down (step-by-step description with photos) from Mother-to-Mother.com

Some tips on the football & cross cradle nursing positions by Kathy Kuhn, IBCLC

Some tips on nursing while lying down by Kathy Kuhn, IBCLC

More useful information

Latching: Thoughts on pushing baby’s chin down when latching @ 

Taking baby off the breast by Marie Davis, IBCLC

PDF Baby-led Latching: An “Intuitive” Approach to Learning How to Breastfeed by Mari Douma, DO, from the Michigan Breastfeeding Network Newsletter, December 2003, Volume 1, Issue 3.

PDF When the Back of the Baby’s Head is Held to Attach the Baby to the Breast by Robyn Noble DMLT, BAppSc(MedSc), IBCLC and Anne Bovey, BspThy

Breast Compression by Jack Newman, MD. The purpose of breast compression is to continue the flow of milk to the baby once the baby no longer drinks on his own, and thus keep him drinking milk. Breast compression simulates a letdown reflex and often stimulates a natural let-down reflex to occur. The technique may be useful for poor weight gain in the baby, colic in the breastfed baby, frequent feedings and/or long feedings, sore nipples in the mother, recurrent blocked ducts and/or mastitis, encouraging the baby who falls asleep quickly to continue drinking.

villagemamma
by Member on Mar. 23, 2013 at 1:01 AM

Awesome thank you! I was told that you needed to pump even if you are a SAHM. I thankfully will be getting to be one for at least the first few months. and i will definitely be reading all the info you sent thank you again.


Quoting gdiamante:


Quoting villagemamma:

 Since i had a c section my milk didnt come in until 4 days after my DD was born.

It normally takes up to a week, even without a c-section.


In the hospital the forced us to supplement with formula despite my absolute insistence on breastfeeding.

Hope you're going to another hospital. Or to a barn.

They told me that nipple confuse was an old wives tale and assured me that everything would be fine and that i was killing my baby by my lack of supply and so i caved.

I am now much older and much wiser from the experience but having not been able to do it personally i want to here some of your lovely ladies suggestions, tips, and tricks for successfull breast feeding.

Some questions i do have in specific are

When did you start pumping? before or after baby?

After. There's no point to doing so before.. And if you're not working or going to be away from baby, don't bother. It's merely more work.

how much should you pump/feed?

Feed ON DEMAND. As often as baby wants. If you're going to be away from baby, pump one side whilke nursing the other once a day oin the AM. Takes NOTHING from baby!

what is the best kind of breast pump?

Depends on your need. SAHM? No pump needed, but if you really want one Avent Isis is fine. Working mom? Hygeia Enjoye or Ameda Purely Yours.

Tricks for getting them to latch?

Latching and Positioning Resources

AUGUST 29, 2011. Posted in: BREASTFEEDING BASICS


No matter what latch and positioning look like, the true measure is in the answers to these two questions:


  1. Is it effective?
  2. Is it comfortable?

Even if latch and positioning look perfect (and, yes, even if a lactation consultant told you they were fine), pain and/or ineffective milk transfer indicate that there is a problem somewhere, and the first suspect is ineffective latch/positioning.

If baby is transferring milk and gaining weight well, and mom is not hurting, then latch and positioning are – by definition – good, even if it’s nothing like the “textbook” latch and positioning that you’ve seen in books.

“Rules and regulations have no place in the mother-baby relationship. Each mother and baby dyad is different and what works well for one mother and baby may not work well for another mother and baby. The important thing to do is to look at the mother and baby as individuals.”– Andrea Eastman, MA, CCE, IBCLC in The Mother-Baby Dance

Following are some of my favorite resources on latch and positioning:

Biological Nurturing: Laid-Back Breastfeeding from Dr. Suzanne Colson. Breastfeeding in a semi-reclined position can be very helpful for both mom and baby.

Newborn Hands: Why are they always in the way while breastfeeding? from the San Diego Breastfeeding Center

Latching handouts by Diane Wiessinger, MS, IBCLC

Breastfeeding: Off to the best start from the UK Department of Health
(Lovely latching pictures here, with simple directions.)

Deep Latch Technique from The Pump Station.
(Good latching pictures and directions.)

When Latching by Anne J. Barnes, has instructions with drawings
(The drawings and tips here are helpful.)

Latching videos by Dr. Jack Newman

Animation illustrating assymetrical latch technique by Victoria Nesterova
(Nice animation — text is in Russian.)

The Mother-Baby Dance: Positioning and Latch-On by Andrea Eastman, MA, CCE, IBCLC
(This is a longish article written for breastfeeding counselors that has some nice descriptions of latching and positioning, along with info on why some things tend to work better than others.)

Is baby latching on and sucking efficiently? How to tell from AskDrSears.com
(A useful list.)

L-A-T-C-H-E-S * Breastfeeding Assessment Tool (for the first 4 weeks) and Scoring Key by Marie Davis, RN, IBCLC
(A tool for professionals that could also be useful for moms who are wondering if breastfeeding is going fine and whether additional help is needed.)

Help for various nursing positions

Lactation yoga, or side-lying nursing without getting up to switch sides by Eva Lyford, @ 

Nursing Laying Down (step-by-step description with photos) from Mother-to-Mother.com

Some tips on the football & cross cradle nursing positions by Kathy Kuhn, IBCLC

Some tips on nursing while lying down by Kathy Kuhn, IBCLC

More useful information

Latching: Thoughts on pushing baby’s chin down when latching @ 

Taking baby off the breast by Marie Davis, IBCLC

PDF Baby-led Latching: An “Intuitive” Approach to Learning How to Breastfeed by Mari Douma, DO, from the Michigan Breastfeeding Network Newsletter, December 2003, Volume 1, Issue 3.

PDF When the Back of the Baby’s Head is Held to Attach the Baby to the Breast by Robyn Noble DMLT, BAppSc(MedSc), IBCLC and Anne Bovey, BspThy

Breast Compression by Jack Newman, MD. The purpose of breast compression is to continue the flow of milk to the baby once the baby no longer drinks on his own, and thus keep him drinking milk. Breast compression simulates a letdown reflex and often stimulates a natural let-down reflex to occur. The technique may be useful for poor weight gain in the baby, colic in the breastfed baby, frequent feedings and/or long feedings, sore nipples in the mother, recurrent blocked ducts and/or mastitis, encouraging the baby who falls asleep quickly to continue drinking.




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mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Mar. 23, 2013 at 1:23 AM
I've had 4 breastfed babies, cumulative 100+ months breastfed, and other than a little bit of pumping or hand expression just to relieve a little bit of engorgment during the first couple weeks, I didn't pump at all, no bottles ever. Women have been successfully breastfeeding long before pumps existed. Pumping before your supply is established (6 weeks give or take) isn't recommended. Supply equals demand. Having TOO much milk isn't a good thing either, unpleasant for both mom and baby.
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graycalico
by Member on Mar. 23, 2013 at 1:37 AM
Hopefully the hospital will have a lactation consultant this time. Don't be afraid to break a bad latch to save your nipples. I've had two sections with no problems getting a supply in, just insist that no formula even enter your hospital room.
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rdh2013
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 1:45 AM
Pumping before the baby could cause contractions and early labor. I like the medela brand. You should start to bf soon after birth. Within 30 mins of birth, the nurses already had my baby latched on for the first time.
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polkaspots
by Gold Member on Mar. 23, 2013 at 2:01 AM
Good luck! Breastfeeding is such a wonderful experience. It is tough in the beginning, but it gets so much easier. It's best to wait until your supply regulates before you start pumping to avoid painful oversupply. You'll know when that happens when your boobs stop feeling full. There are no reasons to pump unless somebody else is going to give baby milk.
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Zazayam
by Nicki on Mar. 23, 2013 at 2:06 AM

I don't think my milk came in to close to or around the 4 day mark...

I tried pumping after the baby, it doesn't work so well for me. I'd just stick to the breast and not the bottle for as long as you can anyway - If you're planning on going back to work or something you really only NEED to have enough stored to get through the first day, since you'll be pumping while you're at work anyway.

Latching tricks... Be flexible and willing to try as many positions/holds as it takes to find one that works for you and the baby. Belly to belly, LO shouldn't have to kink their neck to get at it.

Good luck and congrats! Great decision and you can do it. No question is silly, don't hesitate to ask. These ladies are amazing, they've answered quite a few of my random Q's here and there :)

tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Mar. 23, 2013 at 10:29 AM
NO ONE needs to pump unless baby is unable to nurse physically or because mom is away from baby
aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Mar. 23, 2013 at 11:34 AM
This.
If you're going to go to work, you will need a good double electric pump. I second the recommendation of the Hygeia or Ameda pumps for working and pumping.


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

NO ONE needs to pump unless baby is unable to nurse physically or because mom is away from baby
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Nolanzo
by on Mar. 23, 2013 at 2:06 PM
They snuck my first and second sons formula too. I was livid.

This time around I am EPing, but I actually asked about pumping beforehand. I'm having a c section and after my last c section (there were complications) I was so groggy I was unable to pump or latch for a good few hours, and once again, my second ds was given formula despite my explicit instructions not to.

This time I've. Got about 6 ounces frozen already to go right to the hospital the day of the surgery to avoid this exact scenario, if needed, again. That way if complications arise during my surgery and I have to be knocked out again, there is zero chance of them slipping the baby formula.

We are also insisting on NO nursery time and if she has to leave my side, DH will escort her everywhere.

I was told by my Ibclc that I can pump until 36 weeks IF I do not experience any cramping or contractions, and I think 6 oz is more than enough to sustain her for a few hours if needed. I have never had a problem with contractions.

I'm 34 weeks.

Also, I'm renting a Medela Symphony from the hospital. I've read they are the best, and they run about $12-1500 on amazon so renting is cheaper.

Hope this helps :)
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