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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

needing some encouragement

Posted by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 2:58 AM
  • 25 Replies
I'm 7 months pregnant with an 18 month old DD. I bf DD for a month before switching to formula. It was very painful and I didn't think she was getting enough to eat. This time around, I want to make sure I'm as educated about bf as possible so I don't become discouraged again.

I just wonder how im going to do it now that I have a toddler at my heels when I couldn't do it the first time around without another child needing my attention. Also, do I have to solely bf? Does it make it more difficult if I pump as well? If I do pump, how often (or how little) should she be drinking from a bottle?

I feel overwhelmed. It seems so easy for other moms. But this is our last baby and I really want to experience breast feeding ..not to mention all the known benefits of bf.

Please share your tips, advice, and encouragement with me!!! :-)
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by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 2:58 AM
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Replies (1-10):
outstandingLove
by Cheri on Mar. 24, 2013 at 3:07 AM

It's not always easy. I had a very difficult time with it.

What kind of pain were you in before? Was there nipple damage (cracked or bleeding)?

The easiest way to tell if your nursling is getting enough is by counting diapers! Lots of input = lots of output.

dallas4nu
by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 3:16 AM
Yes, my nipples were cracked and it was just so painful when she latched on (even when I used lanolin). Plus it took a week for my milk to come in (or drop...I don't remember the correct terminology lol) so I'd try and feed or pump for hours and..nothing. idk what I was doing wrong


Quoting outstandingLove:

It's not always easy. I had a very difficult time with it.

What kind of pain were you in before? Was there nipple damage (cracked or bleeding)?

The easiest way to tell if your nursling is getting enough is by counting diapers! Lots of input = lots of output.


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outstandingLove
by Cheri on Mar. 24, 2013 at 3:23 AM
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Quoting dallas4nu:

Yes, my nipples were cracked and it was just so painful when she latched on (even when I used lanolin). Plus it took a week for my milk to come in (or drop...I don't remember the correct terminology lol) so I'd try and feed or pump for hours and..nothing. idk what I was doing wrong


Quoting outstandingLove:

It's not always easy. I had a very difficult time with it.

What kind of pain were you in before? Was there nipple damage (cracked or bleeding)?

The easiest way to tell if your nursling is getting enough is by counting diapers! Lots of input = lots of output.


Bad latch or a tongue tie.

I had to stop using lanolin because i have a sensitivty to wool (which is what lanolin is made of) and it caused a horribe burning sensation. I switched to coconut oil.

A week for your milk to come in seems like a long time, but may have been due to how much pain you were in.


There are lots of women in this group who can offer support and information! You can do it this time!


oliver92
by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 3:53 AM

You can do it successfully, i ebf but its not always easy, with my ds now 3 i was sure it was going to be crazy bc of the other 2 kids, now 14 wks pg with a toddler and the two 11 yr olds, but we just worked it out, never was an issue, I also pump to have supply ready just in case, but pumping was really difficult with my ds, couldnt get a lot out, gave up eventually after a few months, but first ds was much easier.  Hoping this one will be too.  Take a few classes, join some groups, get to know a lc that you can call anytime that will help you latch, etc. surround yourself with positive pro bf people, and dont have formula or bottles on hand to just jump back into. 

Zazayam
by Nicki on Mar. 24, 2013 at 4:41 AM

As far as a toddler to chase you might consider baby wearing, a lot of moms say they nurse their babies in their slings (or whatever carriers) and get a lot done at the same time.

I can hardly pump a couple drops, so I have no advice there...

I think it's pretty normal for your milk to take a weekish to come in, mine was always somewhere between 3 - 5 days. Just count on the baby being stuck to you for the first little while either way :)

Don't even buy/keep formula, you can do it and it's easier without something RIGHT there to use instead if you're feeling frustrated. It's not always easy, but it's worth it. Proper latch is key! Try as many random nursing positions as you have to until you find one that's comfy for you and the baby.

Ask as many questions as you want, no matter how "silly" they feel. These ladies around here have answered all sorts of questions for me, they're pretty amazing.

I always found that lanolin stuff to be crap. Just squeeze a lil milk out and massage it onto your nipples and let it dry, works wonders.

Congrats on the upcoming baby :)

amaromandy
by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 4:55 AM
You can do it! I had my daughter and i breast fed for a month and gave up but this time I didn't give up! Even tough it hurt for a little it goes away! I'm so glad I never gave up! I love being so close with my son! The fact that you don't have to make and warm a bottle especially at night is a plus!
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aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Mar. 24, 2013 at 5:20 AM
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It can take up to a week for mature milk to come in. Before that, you have colostrum, which is all the baby needs until then. Was the pain only at the latch or throughout the whole feeding? Pain at the latch that goes away is normal and will subside within the first few days to weeks. Pain that lasts throughout the feeding indicates a latch issue. It could be from a lip and/or tongue tie that would need to be clipped.
If you decide to pump some, that's fine. Bottles should only be given when you're not there to nurse or the baby could develop a bottle flow preference and refuse to nurse.
When you have more than one child, babywearing is just about mandatory. A sling or wrap would be very helpful so the baby could nurse on demand as needed and allow you to do things with and for your older child. I LOVED my mei tai carrier.
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MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Mar. 24, 2013 at 7:11 AM
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I would wait to pump until your supply is established and baby is nursing well. Before then it can be counter productive because a baby is much better at removing milk than a pump, if properly latched. Read everything you can on kellymom.com.
LilliansMama27
by Candy on Mar. 24, 2013 at 8:04 AM
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Don't worry about not having milk (you won't have it). You will have colostrum and even though its very little it's exactly what baby needs. My LC explained it like this: baby's stomach is about the size of a walnut. Doesn't take much to fill it. That being said, it also will empty quickly so you'll need to nurse often at first. Gives you lots of practice and helps bring your milk in. Colostrum helps get babies first poop out very effectively. Think of it like a powerbar. It'll fill the baby up, but won't be too much for their little tummies. Also, while you're getting all that practice make sure you are always examining the latch and fixing it before it causes damage to your nipples (stick your pink in the side of baby's mouth to break suction then remove and try again).

Good luck! I hope all goes well! Just remember if you ever have a question you can always post on this board. Everyone here is so helpful and they can talk you through any problems you come across :)
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damselle
by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 10:54 AM

Regarding your question about if you have to solely breastfeed...you can combination feed if you feel you need to for some reason.  A lot of working mothers do so if pumping does not work out for them. But it is better to try to exclusively breastfeed for at least the first month or as long as you are able to in order to establish your supply delay the bottle.  However it can eventually lead to an earlier weaning, but at least the baby and you can experience the benefits.  Any amount is better than none.


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