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Pumping while pregnant?

Posted by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:23 PM
  • 9 Replies
So I know many moms who are pregnant and still nursing. My question is, if I'm not currently nursing but I want to start pumping before baby to collect my colostrum and build milk supply, how long should I wait before I start.

My previous two kiddos, I couldn't get my supply up because of latching issues and it took too long to get a pump. Now I have a double pump and want to get a supply going closer to time. I'm only 22 weeks but I was thinking of starting around 36 weeks. I can feel my boobs starting to change already so I'm assuming there starting to make stuff :p
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by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:23 PM
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mamabens
by Miranda on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:28 PM
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Pumping brings on contractions and labor. I wouldn't do it, plus there's no reason to store it. Best thing to do is wait til baby gets here and breastfeeding. . Just because your others had issues doesn't mean this one will

beachlove512
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:28 PM

An LC could probably answer this better, but I wouldn't suggest pumping. Newborns need very little colostrum in the first few days of life so you shouldn't need to build a stash. Even if you were to pump now, your milk wouldn't come in because that doesn't happen until after baby arrives. Right now all you would get is colostrum. Also, pumping during pregnancy can trigger contractions which may bring on labor.

Good luck to you breastfeeding!

egrzesik91
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:30 PM
1 mom liked this
Not sure if it will really build milk supply, other than having an overactive letdown since your body will make more and the baby will be new to nursing and having a newborn stomach that can literally hold a teaspoon. It can take a few days for milk to come in.

I nursed throughout my pregnancy and the skin to skin after birth helped my milk come in and I didn't engorged. I personally think your best bet is to do skin to skin multiple times daily, count wet and poppy dipes, drink a ton of water/juice to stay hydrated during nursing and just relax. Every baby is different and the baby may have no latch issues whatsoever. Also, having a good nursing position is key for a latch. Make sure the babys mouth is open wide and they take in even the areola so you don't get blisters or anything. The first six weeks are tough but you need to get through it.
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KMS8907
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:30 PM
My babies couldn't latch because my nipples are too short. We tried the shields and all kinds of tricks and it just couldn't work. That's why I'm planning to exclusively pump. I'm gonna try again to get baby to latch but I am happy knowing I have my pump to help.

Quoting mamabens:

Pumping brings on contractions and labor. I wouldn't do it, plus there's no reason to store it. Best thing to do is wait til baby gets here and breastfeeding. . Just because your others had issues doesn't mean this one will

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egrzesik91
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:35 PM
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Also, pumping will NOT bring on contractions unless your body is already in the beginning stages of labor. Technically pitocin can't even induce labor unless your body already started. That goes the same for stopping contractions. Once true labor (not braxton hicks though they can be constant as every 15 minutes throughout your entire pregnancy) has begun, no medication or stimulation can stop it. It can slow it down however, that's why staying relaxed during the early stages helps to keep labor steady and getting increasingly now intense.
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mamabens
by Miranda on Apr. 3, 2013 at 9:35 PM

Have you tried wearing shells in your bra when not nursing to pull the nipples out more? Ewing is hard, but doable. I still wouldn't pump before birth.

Quoting KMS8907:

My babies couldn't latch because my nipples are too short. We tried the shields and all kinds of tricks and it just couldn't work. That's why I'm planning to exclusively pump. I'm gonna try again to get baby to latch but I am happy knowing I have my pump to help.

Quoting mamabens:

Pumping brings on contractions and labor. I wouldn't do it, plus there's no reason to store it. Best thing to do is wait til baby gets here and breastfeeding. . Just because your others had issues doesn't mean this one will


 BabyFruit Ticker


maggiemom2000
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:04 PM

Pumping before you have your baby will not help you build up your milk supply. Although you may be able to collect small amounts of colostrum before baby arrives, it will not help with your long term output. Having a "stash" ready before baby arrives won't really help your supply either because you will want to either nurse or pump enough to meet baby's needs. If you give baby what you collected before delivery it will negatively affect your milk supply just like giving formula will.

My suggestion is that instead you learn about how to maximize pumping effectively, and establishing a milk supply by pumping after baby arrives. This video tells you exactly what to do:

http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastfeeding/MaxProduction.html

You may be surprised and have baby latch on great from the beginning!

gdiamante
by Gina on Apr. 4, 2013 at 12:08 AM

Pumping now will do nothing, I'm afraid. Milk comes oly with delivery of the placenta.

Short nipples aren't a problem. Really, they're not. It means mom has to work a little harder at getting baby to open the mouth and mom has to be more pro-acitve about getting the nipple in... push it in, no being shy. **smile**

Check out the kellymom info on flat and inverted nipples; I think it will help you.

aehanrahan
by Group Admin - Amy on Apr. 4, 2013 at 2:24 AM
This!

Quoting gdiamante:

Pumping now will do nothing, I'm afraid. Milk comes oly with delivery of the placenta.

Short nipples aren't a problem. Really, they're not. It means mom has to work a little harder at getting baby to open the mouth and mom has to be more pro-acitve about getting the nipple in... push it in, no being shy. **smile**

Check out the kellymom info on flat and inverted nipples; I think it will help you.

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