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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Do you smoke?

Posted by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:19 PM
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1 mom liked this

Breastfeeding mamas... do you smoke now that you aren't pregnant? 

If so, how long till you were back at it, and do you wait an hour or so after a cigarette to breastfeed? 

Does your baby show any negative symptoms from it, like nausea or trouble staying asleep?

 


EDIT: I don't want googled advice about the risks. I have obviously read them already and that is why. Just looking for moms to share their own experiences. SIDE NOTE >> CM is supposed to be a place for women to find support and friendship. OBVIOUSLY I'm not asking for people to support me and my smoking. My addiction does enough of that. Just curious about other women who are in a similar situation! Thanks :)

by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:19 PM
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Replies (1-10):
bear.katten
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:23 PM
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I started again when DS was 2 months. Research shows that very little nicotine goes into breastmilk and that it is just like alcohol where it is filtered out within a couple of hours. I have actually done a lot of reading on this. It is highly recommended that if you are going to smoke you should keep breastfeeding. It is healthier for baby to be breastfed than formula fed by a smoker. We always smoke outside, take off our jackets and wash our hands, arms, chest. Also, if you smoke a pack or less a day there is minimal risk (I smoke about a half a pack).
I always smoke after breastfeeding so most if not all of the nicotine is gone by the 2nd feeding. I quit for 2 months a bit ago and saw absolutely no change in him.
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xXVICKYXx
by Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:24 PM
I breast feed. Nicotine is out of your milk in 30 mins. My son has never had any negative side effects from my cigarette smoking.
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IrishIz
by Silver Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:27 PM
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Nope never. The risk of second hand smoke is too great. Washing hands and clothes and having a smoking jacket does not remove the risk. This risk is not something I would take with my child.
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kbutton24
by Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:29 PM
1 mom liked this
This. The tar sticks to everything. Third hand smoke is just as bad as second.

Quoting IrishIz:

Nope never. The risk of second hand smoke is too great. Washing hands and clothes and having a smoking jacket does not remove the risk. This risk is not something I would take with my child.
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Bonita131
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:36 PM
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The amount of nicotine that’s present in a smoker’s breast milk is more than double the amount in her bloodstream. Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture containing about 4,000 chemical compounds, including more than 60 carcinogens. How many of these compounds are found in a mother’s milk, and at what levels, has not been determined.

Studies have shown that babies sleep less when their mothers smoke prior to breastfeeding. In addition, heavy smoking can significantly reduce your milk production. Smoking has also been observed to augment the caffeine effect.

Babies of smokers – breastfed or not – are prone to colic and respiratory infections. Smoking and passive smoke may also increase respiratory and ear infections in babies. If you are unwilling to give up smoking, research does show that it is still better to breastfeed than the alternative, because the benefits of breast milk still outweigh the risks from nicotine. The risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) becomes greater when a mother smokes or when the baby is around second-hand (or passive) smoke.

If you find it difficult to quit smoking, limit yourself to as few cigarettes as possible, and try not to light up for several hours before a feeding. (Milk nicotine levels peak 30 to 60 minutes after smoking one or two cigarettes, and it takes three hours for nicotine to clear from your body.)

Never smoke around your baby or inside your home or car (or any indoor area where your baby may be). Wash your hands and face and change your shirt after smoking.

http://www.truthnhealth.com/2012/05/breastfeeding-with-alcohol-caffeine-nicotine-medication-and-recreational-drugs/

MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:44 PM
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No. I've stayed clean for almost 2 years now.
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kss12
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:48 PM
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Not me but my neighbor does.. Kids are fine, she doesn't smoke around any of her kids, baby is fine and she smoked right after giving birth. She only smokes 4 cigarettes a day and says she waits.
I saw a women about to pop smoking a cigarette.
That is beyond me but breastfeeding and smoking is better than formula feeding. Barely any nicotine is in the milk.
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Kreeman
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:48 PM

Yeah, I didn't ask for your googled opinion. This post asked for the honest observations and opinions from breastfeeding smokers! Thanks but no thanks. 


Quoting Bonita131:

The amount of nicotine that’s present in a smoker’s breast milk is more than double the amount in her bloodstream. Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture containing about 4,000 chemical compounds, including more than 60 carcinogens. How many of these compounds are found in a mother’s milk, and at what levels, has not been determined.

Studies have shown that babies sleep less when their mothers smoke prior to breastfeeding. In addition, heavy smoking can significantly reduce your milk production. Smoking has also been observed to augment the caffeine effect.

Babies of smokers – breastfed or not – are prone to colic and respiratory infections. Smoking and passive smoke may also increase respiratory and ear infections in babies. If you are unwilling to give up smoking, research does show that it is still better to breastfeed than the alternative, because the benefits of breast milk still outweigh the risks from nicotine. The risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) becomes greater when a mother smokes or when the baby is around second-hand (or passive) smoke.

If you find it difficult to quit smoking, limit yourself to as few cigarettes as possible, and try not to light up for several hours before a feeding. (Milk nicotine levels peak 30 to 60 minutes after smoking one or two cigarettes, and it takes three hours for nicotine to clear from your body.)

Never smoke around your baby or inside your home or car (or any indoor area where your baby may be). Wash your hands and face and change your shirt after smoking.

http://www.truthnhealth.com/2012/05/breastfeeding-with-alcohol-caffeine-nicotine-medication-and-recreational-drugs/



kss12
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 5:53 PM
1 mom liked this
Lol go kreeman! That's my pet peeve on CM when people just google and copy and paste an answer. Gah!!


Quoting Kreeman:

Yeah, I didn't ask for your googled opinion. This post asked for the honest observations and opinions from breastfeeding smokers! Thanks but no thanks. 



Quoting Bonita131:

The amount of nicotine that’s present in a smoker’s breast milk is more than double the amount in her bloodstream. Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture containing about 4,000 chemical compounds, including more than 60 carcinogens. How many of these compounds are found in a mother’s milk, and at what levels, has not been determined.


Studies have shown that babies sleep less when their mothers smoke prior to breastfeeding. In addition, heavy smoking can significantly reduce your milk production. Smoking has also been observed to augment the caffeine effect.


Babies of smokers – breastfed or not – are prone to colic and respiratory infections. Smoking and passive smoke may also increase respiratory and ear infections in babies. If you are unwilling to give up smoking, research does show that it is still better to breastfeed than the alternative, because the benefits of breast milk still outweigh the risks from nicotine. The risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) becomes greater when a mother smokes or when the baby is around second-hand (or passive) smoke.


If you find it difficult to quit smoking, limit yourself to as few cigarettes as possible, and try not to light up for several hours before a feeding. (Milk nicotine levels peak 30 to 60 minutes after smoking one or two cigarettes, and it takes three hours for nicotine to clear from your body.)


Never smoke around your baby or inside your home or car (or any indoor area where your baby may be). Wash your hands and face and change your shirt after smoking.


http://www.truthnhealth.com/2012/05/breastfeeding-with-alcohol-caffeine-nicotine-medication-and-recreational-drugs/





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bear.katten
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 6:02 PM
1 mom liked this
This is bullshit. I have never read anything that says that and my pedi said the opposite. And how the hell would it magically double?!


Quoting Bonita131:

The amount of nicotine that’s present in a smoker’s breast milk is more than double the amount in her bloodstream. Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture containing about 4,000 chemical compounds, including more than 60 carcinogens. How many of these compounds are found in a mother’s milk, and at what levels, has not been determined.


Studies have shown that babies sleep less when their mothers smoke prior to breastfeeding. In addition, heavy smoking can significantly reduce your milk production. Smoking has also been observed to augment the caffeine effect.


Babies of smokers – breastfed or not – are prone to colic and respiratory infections. Smoking and passive smoke may also increase respiratory and ear infections in babies. If you are unwilling to give up smoking, research does show that it is still better to breastfeed than the alternative, because the benefits of breast milk still outweigh the risks from nicotine. The risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) becomes greater when a mother smokes or when the baby is around second-hand (or passive) smoke.


If you find it difficult to quit smoking, limit yourself to as few cigarettes as possible, and try not to light up for several hours before a feeding. (Milk nicotine levels peak 30 to 60 minutes after smoking one or two cigarettes, and it takes three hours for nicotine to clear from your body.)


Never smoke around your baby or inside your home or car (or any indoor area where your baby may be). Wash your hands and face and change your shirt after smoking.


http://www.truthnhealth.com/2012/05/breastfeeding-with-alcohol-caffeine-nicotine-medication-and-recreational-drugs/


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