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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Solids

Posted by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 1:52 PM
  • 15 Replies

When did you stop ebf and what did you feed lo?
I've been told to start mixing oatmeal cereal and breast milk once a day at 6th months.



Thank you for the advice! I'll be starting with avocados, sweat potato, and possibly bannanas. :)

by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 1:52 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on Apr. 23, 2013 at 1:55 PM
At six months we started giving tastes of things on our plate but he didn't actually eat food until nine months. He ate some ham and green beans on easter.
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K8wizzo
by Kate on Apr. 23, 2013 at 1:56 PM

We started offering bits of avocado or banana at around 6 months.  After that we moved on to other veggies, fruits, and meats (shredded chicken, small bits of steak or pork chop, etc).  Nathan picked them up and fed himself--no spoonfeeding, no cereal.  Infants can't digest grains until they're about 12 months old, so don't bother with cereal.  

Signs of readiness:

at least 6 months old

able to sit unassisted

able to pick up items using a pincer grasp

loss of tongue thrust

When ALL of those conditions are met, cut up some of what you're eating (soft foods) and put it in front of baby.  Easy-peasy.

Macyboss
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:01 PM
I've heard lots of bad things about cereal so it confuses me as to why the doctor recommends it. I've been leaning toward starting with vegies. What about the baby jars of food, did you ever gives those to your babies? I'll do more research when he's closer to that age of course. I think personal experience is good to hear too.


Quoting K8wizzo:

We started offering bits of avocado or banana at around 6 months.  After that we moved on to other veggies, fruits, and meats (shredded chicken, small bits of steak or pork chop, etc).  Nathan picked them up and fed himself--no spoonfeeding, no cereal.  Infants can't digest grains until they're about 12 months old, so don't bother with cereal.  

Signs of readiness:

at least 6 months old

able to sit unassisted

able to pick up items using a pincer grasp

loss of tongue thrust

When ALL of those conditions are met, cut up some of what you're eating (soft foods) and put it in front of baby.  Easy-peasy.


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MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:03 PM
Look up "baby-led solids" on kellymom.com or other resources. A baby should be able to sit it a high chair unsupported, have lost the tongue thrust reflex, and be able to use pincer grasp to put small pieces of food in her own mouth. Therefore, spoon-feeding is not necessary. Most babies do not have the enzymes necessary to properly digest grain products until a year or so, so grains are no longer considered a good first food. Avocado and sweet potato are. Also, until one year, solids are just for fun. The main source of nutrition should still be be breastmilk, which is more calorie-dense than solids. Solids should only be offered after a full nursing session; no nursing, no solids. It is not necessary to offer them even daily at first. The Kellymom article will have more details as to what, when and how. Hope this helps!

Margarett RBC Zavodnyteal ribbon

Macyboss
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:05 PM
Thank you!


Quoting MusherMaggie:

Look up "baby-led solids" on kellymom.com or other resources. A baby should be able to sit it a high chair unsupported, have lost the tongue thrust reflex, and be able to use pincer grasp to put small pieces of food in her own mouth. Therefore, spoon-feeding is not necessary. Most babies do not have the enzymes necessary to properly digest grain products until a year or so, so grains are no longer considered a good first food. Avocado and sweet potato ate. Also, until one year, solids are just for fun. The main source of nutrition should syllable be breastmilk, which is more calorie-dense than solids. Solids should only be offered after s full nursing session; no nutsing, no solids. It is not necessary to offer them even daily at first. The Kellymom article will have more details as to what, when and how. Hope this helps!

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K8wizzo
by Kate on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:09 PM

We never did jarred food, even for my baby who ate purees (oral issues... he couldn't handle chunks until he was about 16 months old).  I made them all myself.  The doctor is going off of old recommendations.  Keep in mind that pedis MAYBE get an hour or two of nutrition classes in school and that's it.  The rest of the info that they get either comes from research they do on their own, or the info that comes with the free samples of formula and baby food that come to their office.

Quoting Macyboss:

I've heard lots of bad things about cereal so it confuses me as to why the doctor recommends it. I've been leaning toward starting with vegies. What about the baby jars of food, did you ever gives those to your babies? I'll do more research when he's closer to that age of course. I think personal experience is good to hear too.


Quoting K8wizzo:

We started offering bits of avocado or banana at around 6 months.  After that we moved on to other veggies, fruits, and meats (shredded chicken, small bits of steak or pork chop, etc).  Nathan picked them up and fed himself--no spoonfeeding, no cereal.  Infants can't digest grains until they're about 12 months old, so don't bother with cereal.  

Signs of readiness:

at least 6 months old

able to sit unassisted

able to pick up items using a pincer grasp

loss of tongue thrust

When ALL of those conditions are met, cut up some of what you're eating (soft foods) and put it in front of baby.  Easy-peasy.



MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:09 PM
The artificial fortifiers in cereal, especially the iron, interfere with the absorption of nutrients in breastmilk, and can actually cause anemia. Most doctors receive their instruction in nutrition from formula companies. Even the American Acadamy of Pediatrics no longer recommends cereal as a first food. You doctor is simply not up to date with his own professional organization.
Mom2Just1
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:09 PM
We do
Baby led solids. No cereal for us.
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Macyboss
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:12 PM
Thank you everyone! I was just talking with the doctor about cereal and then read a post about how bad cereal is and thought I'd ask people that have been through it recently. Ill definitely be staying away from the cereal.
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Macyboss
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:13 PM
I will definitely research that more when he's getting closer to 6 months. Staying away from cereal sounds like a good plan to me.


Quoting MusherMaggie:

The artificial fortifiers in cereal, especially the iron, interfere with the absorption of nutrients in breastmilk, and can actually cause anemia. Most doctors receive their instruction in nutrition from formula companies. Even the American Acadamy of Pediatrics no longer recommends cereal as a first food. You doctor is simply not up to date with his own professional organization.

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