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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

for those of you with seasonal allergies....

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 4:04 PM
  • 12 Replies

what do you take to help? i'm dying here!!  the last time i took zyrtec (3 babies ago), my milk supply all but disappeared and it took a lot of time (and heartache) to build it back up.  this year, my allergies are worse than they ever have been and i'm going nuts.  any suggestions?

by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 4:04 PM
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Replies (1-10):
turttlemom
by Nayelli on Apr. 25, 2013 at 4:40 PM

I don't have suggestions... I'm also wondering the same... since last week I have been sneezing like crazy at work... and I don't know what is causing it!!!!

Junebaby18
by Nannerz on Apr. 25, 2013 at 4:55 PM
1 mom liked this
Claritin, Zyrtec, Allegra
Any without the "D" is safe to take. Just make sure to stay very hydrated, no matter what you take.
MaddiesMama09
by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 5:46 PM

 I'm severly allergic to Zyrtec but have found great relief with Allegra. Claritin made me feel really woozy.

anxiousschk
by Bronze Member on Apr. 25, 2013 at 5:50 PM
2 moms liked this

i take mucinex d and 1 benadryl---- the lactmed app doesnt indicate issues with the "d" in meds-- just stay hydrated 

K8wizzo
by Kate on Apr. 25, 2013 at 7:40 PM
1 mom liked this

For each of the big 3 allergy meds--allegra, zyrtec, and claritin--it warns about taking them in combination with a decongestant.

This is the listing for pseudoephedrine (the "D" in cold/allergy meds) which clearly states that it can cause a drop in milk production.  In fact, studies found a drop of 24%.

Although the small amounts of pseudoephedrine in breastmilk are unlikely to harm the nursing infant, it may cause occasional irritability. A single dose of pseudoephedrine decreases milk production acutely and repeated use seems to interfere with lactation. Mothers with newborns whose lactation is not yet well established or mothers who are having difficulties producing sufficient milk should not receive pseudoephedrine.


Drug Levels: 
Maternal Levels. A single oral dose of 60 mg of pseudoephedrine in 3 women resulted in peak milk levels of less than 1 mg/L 1 hour after the dose.[1] Other authors used data from this study to calculate the amount excreted in milk to be 5.5% of the weight-adjusted maternal dosage.[2] After a 60 mg oral dose of immediate-release pseudoephedrine, peak milk levels averaging 698 mcg/L occurred 1.7 hours after the dose, and half-life in milk was 5.5 hours. A fully breastfed infant would receive a dose of 4.3% (range 2.2 to 6.7%) of the maternal weight-adjusted dose.[2] 

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.


Effects in Breastfed Infants: 
Irritability was reported in 20% of infants exposed to pseudoephedrine in one study of breastfeeding mothers.[3]


Possible Effects on Lactation: 
After a single dose of pseudoephedrine 60 mg orally in 8 nursing mothers, there was a mean 24% decrease in milk production. No change in blood flow to the breast was detected that could explain the decreased milk production; there was a 13.5% decrease in serum prolactin after pseudoephedrine, but this change did not achieve statistical significance. Oxytocin levels were not measured.[2]

Quoting anxiousschk:

i take mucinex d and 1 benadryl---- the lactmed app doesnt indicate issues with the "d" in meds-- just stay hydrated 


GoodyBrook
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 1:32 AM

I've heard that daily eating local, raw honey is supposed to help you build immunity against your allergies...

aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Apr. 26, 2013 at 4:51 AM
I take Zyrtec and use Flonase daily for my seasonal allergies that seem to be year-round here in Sacramento.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Apr. 26, 2013 at 4:52 AM
I have heard this too. I really should look into this and use it in my morning coffee since I don't like to eat honey.

Quoting GoodyBrook:

I've heard that daily eating local, raw honey is supposed to help you build immunity against your allergies...

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
anxiousschk
by Bronze Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 8:35 AM

And yet when I looked  up Allegra D on my lactmed app it only indicates that it *might* have a negative effect on lactation when used with a "D" agent. 

DD is 3 months, I take both regurlarly and just pumped 9oz and then fed her.  The negative effect o lactation is associated with dehydration.  You drink to stay hydrated.  


Quoting K8wizzo:

For each of the big 3 allergy meds--allegra, zyrtec, and claritin--it warns about taking them in combination with a decongestant.

This is the listing for pseudoephedrine (the "D" in cold/allergy meds) which clearly states that it can cause a drop in milk production.  In fact, studies found a drop of 24%.

Although the small amounts of pseudoephedrine in breastmilk are unlikely to harm the nursing infant, it may cause occasional irritability. A single dose of pseudoephedrine decreases milk production acutely and repeated use seems to interfere with lactation. Mothers with newborns whose lactation is not yet well established or mothers who are having difficulties producing sufficient milk should not receive pseudoephedrine.


Drug Levels: 
Maternal Levels. A single oral dose of 60 mg of pseudoephedrine in 3 women resulted in peak milk levels of less than 1 mg/L 1 hour after the dose.[1] Other authors used data from this study to calculate the amount excreted in milk to be 5.5% of the weight-adjusted maternal dosage.[2] After a 60 mg oral dose of immediate-release pseudoephedrine, peak milk levels averaging 698 mcg/L occurred 1.7 hours after the dose, and half-life in milk was 5.5 hours. A fully breastfed infant would receive a dose of 4.3% (range 2.2 to 6.7%) of the maternal weight-adjusted dose.[2] 

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.


Effects in Breastfed Infants: 
Irritability was reported in 20% of infants exposed to pseudoephedrine in one study of breastfeeding mothers.[3]


Possible Effects on Lactation: 
After a single dose of pseudoephedrine 60 mg orally in 8 nursing mothers, there was a mean 24% decrease in milk production. No change in blood flow to the breast was detected that could explain the decreased milk production; there was a 13.5% decrease in serum prolactin after pseudoephedrine, but this change did not achieve statistical significance. Oxytocin levels were not measured.[2]

Quoting anxiousschk:

i take mucinex d and 1 benadryl---- the lactmed app doesnt indicate issues with the "d" in meds-- just stay hydrated 




K8wizzo
by Kate on Apr. 26, 2013 at 8:40 AM

That's awesome that it doesn't affect you.  It doesn't affect me either.  However, the OP already has a history of allergy medications causing a severe decrease in her milk supply.  Hydration can be a factor, but it is NOT the only reason that decongestants can cause a drop in supply.  Some women like you and I will be fine, but in someone with a history of supply problems the best practice advice is to avoid anything that has been demonstrated to cause supply problems.

Quoting anxiousschk:

And yet when I looked  up Allegra D on my lactmed app it only indicates that it *might* have a negative effect on lactation when used with a "D" agent. 

DD is 3 months, I take both regurlarly and just pumped 9oz and then fed her.  The negative effect o lactation is associated with dehydration.  You drink to stay hydrated.  


Quoting K8wizzo:

For each of the big 3 allergy meds--allegra, zyrtec, and claritin--it warns about taking them in combination with a decongestant.

This is the listing for pseudoephedrine (the "D" in cold/allergy meds) which clearly states that it can cause a drop in milk production.  In fact, studies found a drop of 24%.

Although the small amounts of pseudoephedrine in breastmilk are unlikely to harm the nursing infant, it may cause occasional irritability. A single dose of pseudoephedrine decreases milk production acutely and repeated use seems to interfere with lactation. Mothers with newborns whose lactation is not yet well established or mothers who are having difficulties producing sufficient milk should not receive pseudoephedrine.


Drug Levels: 
Maternal Levels. A single oral dose of 60 mg of pseudoephedrine in 3 women resulted in peak milk levels of less than 1 mg/L 1 hour after the dose.[1] Other authors used data from this study to calculate the amount excreted in milk to be 5.5% of the weight-adjusted maternal dosage.[2] After a 60 mg oral dose of immediate-release pseudoephedrine, peak milk levels averaging 698 mcg/L occurred 1.7 hours after the dose, and half-life in milk was 5.5 hours. A fully breastfed infant would receive a dose of 4.3% (range 2.2 to 6.7%) of the maternal weight-adjusted dose.[2] 

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.


Effects in Breastfed Infants: 
Irritability was reported in 20% of infants exposed to pseudoephedrine in one study of breastfeeding mothers.[3]


Possible Effects on Lactation: 
After a single dose of pseudoephedrine 60 mg orally in 8 nursing mothers, there was a mean 24% decrease in milk production. No change in blood flow to the breast was detected that could explain the decreased milk production; there was a 13.5% decrease in serum prolactin after pseudoephedrine, but this change did not achieve statistical significance. Oxytocin levels were not measured.[2]

Quoting anxiousschk:

i take mucinex d and 1 benadryl---- the lactmed app doesnt indicate issues with the "d" in meds-- just stay hydrated 





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