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Transitioning from breastfeeding all the time to bottle feeding?

Posted by on May. 2, 2013 at 12:58 PM
  • 16 Replies

I've breastfed my son since he was born , he is now 4months old. But I have to get a job. I have about a week until I start but have only 2oz saved up :( I don't usually pump alot, and he refuses a bottle. Any advice on pumping enough for him? He needs like 15oz for the few hours Ill be gone. My biggest concern is him refusing a bottle.. I know this is the breastfeeding group but if anyone could give me suggestions on bottles that are similar to breast that'd be a huge help... Thanks!

by on May. 2, 2013 at 12:58 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jackiewal10
by Silver Member on May. 2, 2013 at 1:01 PM

How many hours will you be gone?  15 ounces is a TON.  That would be enough if you were going to be gone for 12-15 hours a day.  Neither of my sons ever took a bottle.  We literally probably spent hundreds of dollars on different bottles.  I would try a sippy cup or even just a regular cup that someone can tip for him.

Januarybaby2013
by on May. 2, 2013 at 1:12 PM

He eats so much , He is very hungry and usually eats two ounces of rice cereal twice a day. & breast feeds on demand , so I was kind of going above what he needed just in case.. I'm a first time mom , very paranoid lol.

K8wizzo
by Kate on May. 2, 2013 at 1:15 PM
1 mom liked this

One of the frequently asked questions of breastfeeding is “How much milk should I leave my baby while we are separated?”

The answers that I’ve seen vary. The answer that I subscribe to is “The One Ounce Per Hour Rule”.  (Which could be better described as the 1-1.25oz/hour rule).

The one ounce per hour rule is based on the average daily requirements of a breastfed infant who will take in 25oz/day of milk. (This does not vary much between one and six months). While amounts might be more or less during exclusive pumping / bottle feeding, the “One Ounce Per Hour” rule is considered the standard for shorter periods of mother and infant separation.

This method is the “breastfeeding friendly” method that is most likely to lead to longer term breastfeeding success. Other methods that allow on-demand feeding from bottles or that follow amount guidelines for formula fed babies often lead to supply decrease and early weaning or supplementation of non-human milk.

I’ve heard a lot of moms say that they are anxious about the one-ounce-per-hour rule of feeding a breastfed infant while separated from mom. I understand it. I was anxious as a new mom, too, and wanted to leave MORE than my baby needed because it hurt to leave him and I wanted to make sure he would be happy and satisfied while I was away.

The thing is.. It’s not starving your baby and it’s not letting your baby go hungry. It’s something your baby is already used to. The supply in your breasts is not static. It goes up and down across the day. Your baby is already used to this.

Your baby eats the same amount each day between one month and when solids are introduced. (A bit more during growth spurts- but this should happen at mom’s breast, since her supply has to scale.) This amount for breastfed babies averages out to 25oz/day with some babies eating as little as 19oz/day. Your supply is not static across the day, it increases and decreases across the day, so baby learns to nurse more during high supply hours, and less during low supply hours (which are typically in the evening)

What the one ounce per hour rule does is it encourages baby to view the bottle feeds as “low supply”, and mom-feeds as “high supply” and baby nurses more with mom and less with the bottle. Baby’s needs are met, not exceeded. More than one ounce per hour means baby finds bottle = high supply, breast = low supply, and starts fussing for more bottle, less mom. This means mom is stuck pumping HUGE amounts of milk.

This causes problems because the pump is ineffective. It’s like trying to siphon water out of a well with a drinking straw. It’s tedious, it’s boring, it’s a pain in the butt. Mom’s breasts let down easily to an eager baby, and noooot so well to a pump. 1-2oz per pumping session is actually EXCELLENT output. If baby is downing 2oz/hour or more than one ounce/hour? Mom would have to pump constantly at work to make up for it.

Better to convince baby that the bottle has a rotten supply and that it’s easier to gorge off mom. Easier on mom, easy enough on baby, and baby’s needs are more than met with the ounce per hour.

Sources: Average Intake of Breastmilk (Kellymom)

*** Important caveat: As with all “rules” there are exceptions. If mom and baby are routinely separated from each other during ALL of the highest supply hours of mom’s day and are only together briefly, the one ounce per hour rule might not work and baby may need more frequent feedings during separation. View the rule as a guideline and as a possible warning sign that your caregiver is overfeeding the baby or giving bottles that are too large/too frequent. It may not be the amount that is a problem but the bottle size. Maybe baby will do better with more frequent 2oz bottles. Maybe your pumping sessions need to be longer or more frequent in order to get milk of the right composition for what baby needs while separated. Never follow ANY rule that doesn’t work for your child.

 
kellymom127
by Member on May. 2, 2013 at 1:16 PM

sound like you may be over feeding him with the rice cereal twice a day... solids shouldn't start until 6 months

someone other than mom needs to try to feed him a bottle since he most likely won't take it from you if you want to practice before you work (so see if he like that type of bottle).

Baby_Avas_Momma
by Elizabeth on May. 2, 2013 at 1:20 PM
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Way too young for solids, and rice cereal is garbage. Breastfed babies will only ever need 1-1.25oz per hour in bottles no larger than 3oz. Bottle amounts need to be kept at a minimum so that baby does not get overfed, and to preserve your supply. 15oz is a massive amount and is enough for a 12-15hr work day.
If you're the one giving the bottle, stop, you shouldn't even be in the house. Leave baby and bottle with sitter and go. Nipples on the bottle need to always be the slowest flow, baby needs to be fed upright with the bottle parallel to the floor. Baby needs to be burped after atleast every ounce, it needs to take a good 15-20 to finish a bottle. You can also try a sippy cup with or without the inside valve removed.
You WANT baby to be hungry when you get home, that's what will keep your supply up and make sure that you'll be able to keep up with pumping. And remember that breastmilk has more fat, calories, and nutrition than any solids, so giving him solids this early is decreasing the amount of good stuff he *needs* from your milk.
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KylersMom8-16-7
by Bronze Member on May. 2, 2013 at 1:59 PM
Unless you're working 15 hours he doesn't need that much...
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Dibsy
by on May. 2, 2013 at 2:25 PM
I can't say anything about how much or anything, I did have to pump in the beginning and it got to where my freezer was completely full and I'd be engourged all day long. That's off topic though. My son, when he was on the bottle, HATED Aventi and regular bottles. He'd eat from the Similac ones but his FAVORITE by far was Tommy Tippee. Something about the shape of the nipple and how flexible it was maybe. It helped a lot for us. But all babies are different so what my son liked your baby may hate, it's really trial and error.
aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 2, 2013 at 4:26 PM
All of this!!!
You'll need even less milk if you nurse right before you leave and as soon as you return, then leave 2-3 ounce bottles to be given every 2-3 hours between those nursing sessions.


Quoting Baby_Avas_Momma:

Way too young for solids, and rice cereal is garbage. Breastfed babies will only ever need 1-1.25oz per hour in bottles no larger than 3oz. Bottle amounts need to be kept at a minimum so that baby does not get overfed, and to preserve your supply. 15oz is a massive amount and is enough for a 12-15hr work day.
If you're the one giving the bottle, stop, you shouldn't even be in the house. Leave baby and bottle with sitter and go. Nipples on the bottle need to always be the slowest flow, baby needs to be fed upright with the bottle parallel to the floor. Baby needs to be burped after atleast every ounce, it needs to take a good 15-20 to finish a bottle. You can also try a sippy cup with or without the inside valve removed.
You WANT baby to be hungry when you get home, that's what will keep your supply up and make sure that you'll be able to keep up with pumping. And remember that breastmilk has more fat, calories, and nutrition than any solids, so giving him solids this early is decreasing the amount of good stuff he *needs* from your milk.
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aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 2, 2013 at 4:28 PM
Start pumping first thing every morning and you'll have plenty for your first day. Once you start, what you pump one day is what you send the next day. Keep pumping every morning and every 2-3 hours while you're gone.
How long will you be gone?
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turttlemom
by Nayelli on May. 2, 2013 at 4:31 PM

My son is at daycare 11 hours a day, he gets between 9 and 12 oz per feed every 3 or 4 hours and I just pump twice a day because of my meetings and stuff at work (not recommended, it's better every 2 hours), he doesn't like bottles either that's why he sometimes just eat 9 oz in total. He does nurse before I drop him and immediately when we get back home.

DS has used a lot of bottles and the one it seems he likes the most is Avent natural. But as PP said, every baby is different. Good luck mama.

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