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Is my baby eating too much (when bottlefed)???

Posted by on May. 6, 2013 at 3:23 PM
  • 29 Replies

 So I am going back to work tonight, and I have been getting Jaylah used to getting bottlefed for the past week. She eats 4-5 ounces every 3 hours..... is that too much??? I dont want to compromise my supply! But I dont want her to act hungry either! She is 2 months old!

by on May. 6, 2013 at 3:23 PM
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Replies (1-10):
XMaybebabyX
by on May. 6, 2013 at 3:25 PM
I would say so. Her bottles should not be any larger than 3 oz.
MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on May. 6, 2013 at 3:26 PM
1 mom liked this
way too much. she only need an ounce per hour in bottles no bigger than three ounces. ever. and there is no "getting a baby used to a bottle". She will take it for the caregiver or she won't. And she may suddenly refuse them at anytime.
pinkiebabii
by Jennie on May. 6, 2013 at 3:28 PM
Yes. No bottles should ever be more than three ounces, whether baby is one day old or one year old.
The rule is 1-1.25 ounces per hour. If you are working 8 hours, don't leave more than ten ounces and no more than 3 Oz per bottle.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
kilahchaos
by Member on May. 6, 2013 at 3:29 PM

 after she eats 3 ounces, she is still fussy for more, so then what do you do? Just let her cry? I dont really know how all this works? I dont want her screaming the whole time I am gone, I dont think my husband can handle that and our toddler....

Quoting MommyO2-6631:

way too much. she only need an ounce per hour in bottles no bigger than three ounces. ever. and there is no "getting a baby used to a bottle". She will take it for the caregiver or she won't. And she may suddenly refuse them at anytime.

 

kilahchaos
by Member on May. 6, 2013 at 3:31 PM

 She acts like she still wants more? I dont know what to do! Is there any tips or tricks? I am afraid she wont be full enough, and just cry the whole time I am gone. Do they have to go 3 hours, or can they go sooner?

Quoting pinkiebabii:

Yes. No bottles should ever be more than three ounces, whether baby is one day old or one year old.
The rule is 1-1.25 ounces per hour. If you are working 8 hours, don't leave more than ten ounces and no more than 3 Oz per bottle.

 

aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 6, 2013 at 3:34 PM

Yes, that is too much! She should get 2-3 ounces every 2-3 hours between nursing sessions while you're gone. Babies her age act hungry ALL THE TIME! It doesn't mean that she's not getting enough. She will get plenty while you're gone and get even more when you're home. Bottles are supposed to just tide her over until the good stuff is available. Bottles = famine and breasts = feast.

Have you read this?

http://nurshable.com/2011/12/29/the-one-ounce-per-hour-rule-of-bottle-feeding/


One of the frequently asked questions of breastfeeding is “How much milk should I leave my baby while we are separated?”

The answers that I’ve seen vary. The answer that I subscribe to is “The One Ounce Per Hour Rule”.  (Which could be better described as the 1-1.25oz/hour rule).

The one ounce per hour rule is based on the average daily requirements of a breastfed infant who will take in 25oz/day of milk. (This does not vary much between one and six months). While amounts might be more or less during exclusive pumping / bottle feeding, the “One Ounce Per Hour” rule is considered the standard for shorter periods of mother and infant separation.

This method is the “breastfeeding friendly” method that is most likely to lead to longer term breastfeeding success. Other methods that allow on-demand feeding from bottles or that follow amount guidelines for formula fed babies often lead to supply decrease and early weaning or supplementation of non-human milk.

I’ve heard a lot of moms say that they are anxious about the one-ounce-per-hour rule of feeding a breastfed infant while separated from mom. I understand it. I was anxious as a new mom, too, and wanted to leave MORE than my baby needed because it hurt to leave him and I wanted to make sure he would be happy and satisfied while I was away.

The thing is.. It’s not starving your baby and it’s not letting your baby go hungry. It’s something your baby is already used to. The supply in your breasts is not static. It goes up and down across the day. Your baby is already used to this.

Your baby eats the same amount each day between one month and when solids are introduced. (A bit more during growth spurts- but this should happen at mom’s breast, since her supply has to scale.) This amount for breastfed babies averages out to 25oz/day with some babies eating as little as 19oz/day. Your supply is not static across the day, it increases and decreases across the day, so baby learns to nurse more during high supply hours, and less during low supply hours (which are typically in the evening)

What the one ounce per hour rule does is it encourages baby to view the bottle feeds as “low supply”, and mom-feeds as “high supply” and baby nurses more with mom and less with the bottle. Baby’s needs are met, not exceeded. More than one ounce per hour means baby finds bottle = high supply, breast = low supply, and starts fussing for more bottle, less mom. This means mom is stuck pumping HUGE amounts of milk.

This causes problems because the pump is ineffective. It’s like trying to siphon water out of a well with a drinking straw. It’s tedious, it’s boring, it’s a pain in the butt. Mom’s breasts let down easily to an eager baby, and noooot so well to a pump. 1-2oz per pumping session is actually EXCELLENT output. If baby is downing 2oz/hour or more than one ounce/hour? Mom would have to pump constantly at work to make up for it.

Better to convince baby that the bottle has a rotten supply and that it’s easier to gorge off mom. Easier on mom, easy enough on baby, and baby’s needs are more than met with the ounce per hour.

Sources: Average Intake of Breastmilk (Kellymom)

*** Important caveat: As with all “rules” there are exceptions. If mom and baby are routinely separated from each other during ALL of the highest supply hours of mom’s day and are only together briefly, the one ounce per hour rule might not work and baby may need more frequent feedings during separation. View the rule as a guideline and as a possible warning sign that your caregiver is overfeeding the baby or giving bottles that are too large/too frequent. It may not be the amount that is a problem but the bottle size. Maybe baby will do better with more frequent 2oz bottles. Maybe your pumping sessions need to be longer or more frequent in order to get milk of the right composition for what baby needs while separated. Never follow ANY rule that doesn’t work for your child.

pinkiebabii
by Jennie on May. 6, 2013 at 3:35 PM
You can do two ounces every two hours.
Check out Kellymom to see how to properly bottle feed a breastfed baby.
It should be very slowly and burping between ounces.


Quoting kilahchaos:

 She acts like she still wants more? I dont know what to do! Is there any tips or tricks? I am afraid she wont be full enough, and just cry the whole time I am gone. Do they have to go 3 hours, or can they go sooner?


Quoting pinkiebabii:

Yes. No bottles should ever be more than three ounces, whether baby is one day old or one year old.
The rule is 1-1.25 ounces per hour. If you are working 8 hours, don't leave more than ten ounces and no more than 3 Oz per bottle.

 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
kilahchaos
by Member on May. 6, 2013 at 3:36 PM

 Its funny, I just read this. Since I have been bottlefeeding her a week, did I just ruin this, or stretch out her stomach? I am so worried!

Quoting aehanrahan:

Yes, that is too much! She should get 2-3 ounces every 2-3 hours between nursing sessions while you're gone. Babies her age act hungry ALL THE TIME! It doesn't mean that she's not getting enough. She will get plenty while you're gone and get even more when you're home. Bottles are supposed to just tide her over until the good stuff is available. Bottles = famine and breasts = feast.

Have you read this?

http://nurshable.com/2011/12/29/the-one-ounce-per-hour-rule-of-bottle-feeding/

 

One of the frequently asked questions of breastfeeding is “How much milk should I leave my baby while we are separated?”

The answers that I’ve seen vary. The answer that I subscribe to is “The One Ounce Per Hour Rule”.  (Which could be better described as the 1-1.25oz/hour rule).

The one ounce per hour rule is based on the average daily requirements of a breastfed infant who will take in 25oz/day of milk. (This does not vary much between one and six months). While amounts might be more or less during exclusive pumping / bottle feeding, the “One Ounce Per Hour” rule is considered the standard for shorter periods of mother and infant separation.

This method is the “breastfeeding friendly” method that is most likely to lead to longer term breastfeeding success. Other methods that allow on-demand feeding from bottles or that follow amount guidelines for formula fed babies often lead to supply decrease and early weaning or supplementation of non-human milk.

I’ve heard a lot of moms say that they are anxious about the one-ounce-per-hour rule of feeding a breastfed infant while separated from mom. I understand it. I was anxious as a new mom, too, and wanted to leave MORE than my baby needed because it hurt to leave him and I wanted to make sure he would be happy and satisfied while I was away.

The thing is.. It’s not starving your baby and it’s not letting your baby go hungry. It’s something your baby is already used to. The supply in your breasts is not static. It goes up and down across the day. Your baby is already used to this.

Your baby eats the same amount each day between one month and when solids are introduced. (A bit more during growth spurts- but this should happen at mom’s breast, since her supply has to scale.) This amount for breastfed babies averages out to 25oz/day with some babies eating as little as 19oz/day. Your supply is not static across the day, it increases and decreases across the day, so baby learns to nurse more during high supply hours, and less during low supply hours (which are typically in the evening)

What the one ounce per hour rule does is it encourages baby to view the bottle feeds as “low supply”, and mom-feeds as “high supply” and baby nurses more with mom and less with the bottle. Baby’s needs are met, not exceeded. More than one ounce per hour means baby finds bottle = high supply, breast = low supply, and starts fussing for more bottle, less mom. This means mom is stuck pumping HUGE amounts of milk.

This causes problems because the pump is ineffective. It’s like trying to siphon water out of a well with a drinking straw. It’s tedious, it’s boring, it’s a pain in the butt. Mom’s breasts let down easily to an eager baby, and noooot so well to a pump. 1-2oz per pumping session is actually EXCELLENT output. If baby is downing 2oz/hour or more than one ounce/hour? Mom would have to pump constantly at work to make up for it.

Better to convince baby that the bottle has a rotten supply and that it’s easier to gorge off mom. Easier on mom, easy enough on baby, and baby’s needs are more than met with the ounce per hour.

Sources: Average Intake of Breastmilk (Kellymom)

*** Important caveat: As with all “rules” there are exceptions. If mom and baby are routinely separated from each other during ALL of the highest supply hours of mom’s day and are only together briefly, the one ounce per hour rule might not work and baby may need more frequent feedings during separation. View the rule as a guideline and as a possible warning sign that your caregiver is overfeeding the baby or giving bottles that are too large/too frequent. It may not be the amount that is a problem but the bottle size. Maybe baby will do better with more frequent 2oz bottles. Maybe your pumping sessions need to be longer or more frequent in order to get milk of the right composition for what baby needs while separated. Never follow ANY rule that doesn’t work for your child.

 

aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 6, 2013 at 3:37 PM

How are the bottles being fed? She should be sitting upright with the bottle parallel to the floor and be burped after each ounce to keep the feeding slow. If she's sucking it down too fast, her body doesn't get the I'm full signal at the right time. I'll post the article about this.

Quoting kilahchaos:

 She acts like she still wants more? I dont know what to do! Is there any tips or tricks? I am afraid she wont be full enough, and just cry the whole time I am gone. Do they have to go 3 hours, or can they go sooner?

Quoting pinkiebabii:

Yes. No bottles should ever be more than three ounces, whether baby is one day old or one year old.
The rule is 1-1.25 ounces per hour. If you are working 8 hours, don't leave more than ten ounces and no more than 3 Oz per bottle.

 


aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on May. 6, 2013 at 3:39 PM

http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/feeding-tools/bottle-feeding/


How to bottle-feed the breastfed baby

July 28, 2011. Posted in: Feeding baby

…tips for a breastfeeding supportive style of bottle feeding

PDF version (great for child care providers)

by Eva Lyford. Reprinted with permission from the author.

Often, as infant feeding specialists, lactation consultants and other experts in the field of human lactation are asked how to properly bottle-feed a baby. Direct breastmilk feedings from the mother’s breast are always preferred to any artificial source or substance. In addition, there are often alternatives to bottle-feeding, such as cup feeding, which should be explored. For the baby who has to be bottle-fed, following is some information to help make the experience a good one for the baby and also to make sure that breastfeeding is fully supported even when artificial feedings are used.

This information can also be useful in evaluating infant care providers and for instructing them on how to bottle-feed a breastfed infant. Note that when working through any feeding difficulties with an infant, a lactation consultant is an excellent resource for evaluating methods for their appropriateness to the specific situation.

While useful for any bottle-fed infant, this information is particularly targeted towards infants between 12 weeks and 6 months of age.

Babies should be bottle-fed:

  1. When their cues indicate hunger, rather than on a schedule.
  2. Held in an upright position; it is especially important to avoid letting the baby drink from a bottle when lying down. Such a position is associated with bottle caries and an increased frequency of ear infections. Note also that babies should be held often at times when they are not being fed, to avoid the baby being trained to eat in order to be held.
  3. With a switch from one side to the other side midway through a feed; this provides for eye stimulation and development, and thwarts the development of a side preference which could impact the breastfeeding mother.
  4. For 10-20 minutes at a time, to mimic the usual breastfeeding experience. Care providers should be encouraged to make appropriate quantities last the average length of a feeding, rather than trying to feed as much as they can in as short a time as possible. This time element is significant because the infant’s system needs time to recognize satiety, long before the stomach has a chance to get over-filled.
  5. Gently, allowing the infant to draw nipple into mouth rather than pushing the nipple into the infant’s mouth, so that baby controls when the feed begins. Stroke baby’s lips from top to bottom with the nipple to illicit a rooting response of a wide open mouth, and then allow the baby to “accept” the nipple rather than poking it in.
  6. Consistent with a breastfed rhythm; the caregiver should encourage frequent pauses while the baby drinks from the bottle to mimic the breastfeeding mother’s let-down patterns. This discourages the baby from guzzling the bottle and can mitigate nipple confusion or preference.
  7. To satiation, so that baby is not aggressively encouraged to finish the last bit of milk in the bottle by such measures as forcing the nipple into the mouth, massaging the infant’s jaw or throat, or rattling the nipple around in the infant’s mouth. If baby is drowsing off and releasing the bottle nipple before the bottle is empty that means baby is done; don’t reawaken the baby to “finish.” See Bottlefeeding tips from AskDrSears.com.

The benefits of bottle-feeding in this manner:

  1. The infant will consume a volume appropriate to their size and age, rather than over- or under-eating. This can support the working and pumping mom who then has an increased likelihood of pumping a daily volume equivalent to the baby’s demand.
  2. This can minimize colic-like symptoms in the baby whose stomach is distended or over-fed.
  3. It supports the breastfeeding relationship, hopefully leading to longer durations and increased success at breastfeeding particularly for mothers who are separated from their nurslings either intermittently or recurrently.

Bottle-feeding Myth 1:
Bottle-feeding lets me know how much nutrition the baby has had.

Moms who bottle-feed, whether using expressed breast milk or anything else, should be aware that while artificial feeding may seem to be a very accurate measure of volume consumed, in fact it is often not. Bottle-fed infants more often regurgitate some quantity of a feed, or get a less than perfect balance of fore and hind milk than they might if feeding directly from the breast. If a substance other than breastmilk is used, the increased metabolic workload for the baby, lower digestibility of nutrients and increased waste substantially dilute the benefit of a feed, although it is more easily measured.

Bottle-feeding Myth 2:
It is easy to bottle-feed safely.

Bottle-feeding caregivers face certain challenges in feeding a baby safely. One extra piece of work is sterilizing all infant feeding equipment for at least the first 4 months. And, if artificial substances are used:

  1. Lot numbers should be kept for any artificial milks fed to the baby, so that parents can determine whether the product was subject to a recall.
  2. A clean source of water must be available, free from bacteria. If tap water is used, the caregiver must decide whether to boil the water to eliminate bacteria (which may concentrate any heavy metals in the water), or to use unboiled water. If bottled water is used, lot numbers should be recorded. Powdered infant formula should be mixed with water that is at least 70°C/158°F to kill any harmful bacteria that may be present in the powdered formula.
  3. Quantities the baby will need should be carefully estimated, since unused formula must be discarded. Overestimating can lead to having to throw out the unused amount – and that is quite an expensive piece of waste.

For more information on infant feeding myths, see Dr. Jack Newman’s Breastfeeding Myths

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