Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

:(

Posted by on May. 24, 2013 at 2:28 AM
  • 13 Replies
so i had my baby today. By csection, so im in a lot of pain and not really moving yet. Anyways. Thaddy latched on perfect the first time. Did both sides and he was content. 3.5 hours later he was ready to eat again, and once again it was perfect. 3.5 hours later he wanted to eat and he wouldnt latch on properly. I dont know why. I kept unlatching and trying to relatch but he refused to keep the whole nipple in his mouth so it was really painful. Then at 730 he was hungry again. Starving (he went longer than 3.5 hours but i kept trying until he finally would eat). Well he would latch correctly on the left side but not the right. And he ate twice as long as he was and he was still hungry but had to have his vitals and sugar checked. After that he has basically refused to eat. Hes starving. Constantly rooting. Screaming and crying. He wont latch on my right at all. We try until he cries himself to sleep. Hell latch (wrong) on my left but only for 5 minutes and then starts screaming until hes asleep. Im so lost.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on May. 24, 2013 at 2:28 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
gdiamante
by Gina on May. 24, 2013 at 3:28 AM


Quoting jesuschild06:

so i had my baby today. By csection, so im in a lot of pain and not really moving yet. Anyways. Thaddy latched on perfect the first time. Did both sides and he was content. 3.5 hours later he was ready to eat again, and once again it was perfect. 3.5 hours later he wanted to eat and he wouldnt latch on properly. I dont know why.
It's not unusual, actually. 
I kept unlatching and trying to relatch but he refused to keep the whole nipple in his mouth so it was really painful. Then at 730 he was hungry again. Starving (he went longer than 3.5 hours but i kept trying until he finally would eat).
I assure you he wasn't starving... just making you THINK he was. That's a survival technique.
Well he would latch correctly on the left side but not the right.
Quite normal.
And he ate twice as long as he was and he was still hungry but had to have his vitals and sugar checked. After that he has basically refused to eat. Hes starving. Constantly rooting. Screaming and crying. He wont latch on my right at all. We try until he cries himself to sleep. Hell latch (wrong) on my left but only for 5 minutes and then starts screaming until hes asleep. Im so lost.
For now, don't bother with the side he won't take. You could nurse your entire career on the left sifde only and it's FINE. You can pump the right for now. Try latching with it again in the morning when you feel fresh and in less pain.
Yopu're doing WAY better than you realize.


got2monsters
by on May. 24, 2013 at 3:30 AM
2 moms liked this
These answers are perfect!


Quoting gdiamante:


Quoting jesuschild06:

so i had my baby today. By csection, so im in a lot of pain and not really moving yet. Anyways. Thaddy latched on perfect the first time. Did both sides and he was content. 3.5 hours later he was ready to eat again, and once again it was perfect. 3.5 hours later he wanted to eat and he wouldnt latch on properly. I dont know why.
It's not unusual, actually. 
I kept unlatching and trying to relatch but he refused to keep the whole nipple in his mouth so it was really painful. Then at 730 he was hungry again. Starving (he went longer than 3.5 hours but i kept trying until he finally would eat).
I assure you he wasn't starving... just making you THINK he was. That's a survival technique.
Well he would latch correctly on the left side but not the right.
Quite normal.
And he ate twice as long as he was and he was still hungry but had to have his vitals and sugar checked. After that he has basically refused to eat. Hes starving. Constantly rooting. Screaming and crying. He wont latch on my right at all. We try until he cries himself to sleep. Hell latch (wrong) on my left but only for 5 minutes and then starts screaming until hes asleep. Im so lost.
For now, don't bother with the side he won't take. You could nurse your entire career on the left sifde only and it's FINE. You can pump the right for now. Try latching with it again in the morning when you feel fresh and in less pain.
Yopu're doing WAY better than you realize.



Posted on CafeMom Mobile
jesuschild06
by on May. 24, 2013 at 2:41 PM
Thanks. My nipples are so sore already. I saw the lactation consultant today and she didnt help at all. Just made me more frusterated seeing her because i was already trying what she told me to do. I cried while he nursed today because it hurt so bad. Oh and she has insisted that i wake him every 2 hours to make him eat. Which has only made it worse because he doesnt want to eat that often! So we both just get frusterated and even if he does latch right he sucks twice and falls right back to sleep and in order to wake him enough to get him sucking again we have to attempt to relatch because he pulls himself off because hes mad for being woken up. What happened to feeding on demand?

Oh and he went 8 hours last night without eating. He refused to latch at all. He just wanted to suck his thumb and would cry everytime i tried feeding him. I left him skin to skin for 5 of those hours. Trying every hour to get him to eat. How do you make a baby eat when they dont want to???


Quoting gdiamante:


polkaspots
by on May. 24, 2013 at 2:45 PM
1 mom liked this
Unless he's not making any diapers you don't have to worry about waking him every two hours. Three and a half hours is a completely acceptable amount of time to go between feedings. My nipples were sore for the first two weeks with ds. Then they healed up and didn't hurt anymore. Latching can suck at certain times, but as long as you're consistent with it, he won't learn to latch the wrong way.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
gdiamante
by Gina on May. 24, 2013 at 2:46 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting jesuschild06:

Thanks. My nipples are so sore already.
That tells me the latch is slipping. Be ready for the unlatch relatch dance, and if you have lansinoh, use it liberally. Breastmilk on the nipples also helps; let them air dry.
I saw the lactation consultant today and she didnt help at all. Just made me more frusterated seeing her because i was already trying what she told me to do. I cried while he nursed today because it hurt so bad.
The latch is bad, then. When it hurts you take him off and relatch him.
Oh and she has insisted that i wake him every 2 hours to make him eat.
ONLY do this if there is jaundice or there aren't enough diapers (one per day of life right now). Otherwise ON DEMAND. I think you need to fire the LC.
Which has only made it worse because he doesnt want to eat that often! So we both just get frusterated and even if he does latch right he sucks twice and falls right back to sleep and in order to wake him enough to get him sucking again we have to attempt to relatch because he pulls himself off because hes mad for being woken up. What happened to feeding on demand?
It never went anywhere. Many hospital LCs are merely nurses who got a couple opf breastfeeidng classes. Google FIND AN IBCLC to get a GOOD lactation consulant with extensive training.

Oh and he went 8 hours last night without eating. He refused to latch at all. He just wanted to suck his thumb and would cry everytime i tried feeding him. I left him skin to skin for 5 of those hours. Trying every hour to get him to eat. How do you make a baby eat when they dont want to???
You can't. And it's not a worry UNLESS there's jaundice or lack of dipes. 
isaacsmommy68
by on May. 24, 2013 at 3:56 PM
1 mom liked this

If you had a c-section he may be tired from the anesthesia. Your doing great. The first few weeks are hard. Everyone is learning. Congrats!

jesuschild06
by on May. 24, 2013 at 4:15 PM
Yeah even when she got him to latch and said it was perfect i still wanted to cry from the pain half the time. He gets so angry when we play the relatch game. Oh and i used the nipple cream stuff and im wondering if that is why he wouldnt eat for 8 or 9 hours. Rifht before i went to sleep and this morning i just used my colustrum to try to ease the pain a little before he ate and this morning he went right to the boob. So today i have just used colustrum after feedings and between them.

Quoting gdiamante:


gdiamante
by Gina on May. 24, 2013 at 5:04 PM

The colostrum will help. Latch can't be evaluated solely through looking at it. Is it hurting throughout the feeding or only at the start? The first is a problem and I'd get baby checked for tongue tie in that case. The second is something that will pass.

jesuschild06
by on May. 24, 2013 at 5:56 PM
Nirmally throughout the feeding but it didnt the first couple. I had no pain the first couple feedings. They said i probably jave pain now because my nipples are sore (they hurt to even touch with my fingers). But i can still feel a difference in the pain from a bad latch and the pain from my nipples being sore. But is it possible to have a lip/tongue tie and the first couple feedings not hurt at all? Ill ask the pediatrition tomorrow to check though.

Quoting gdiamante:

The colostrum will help. Latch can't be evaluated solely through looking at it. Is it hurting throughout the feeding or only at the start? The first is a problem and I'd get baby checked for tongue tie in that case. The second is something that will pass.


K8wizzo
by Kate on May. 24, 2013 at 7:19 PM

From experience, yes it is.  Get him checked and take a look at him yourself.  Pictures for you:

Self Help



Tongue Tie Help    Latch Help

Is My Baby Tongue-tied?

Now that more mothers are breastfeeding, tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is on the forefront of medical research again. Some tongue-tied babies breastfeed without difficulty, others cause their mother pain, don't get enough milk, or have difficulty swallowing properly and are very unhappy during and after feeding.

If you are concerned that your baby may be tongue-tied, the following may help you decide if you need more help. An IBCLC (International Board Certified Lactation Consultant) can help with breastfeeding, and many different dentists and doctors can help if your baby needs treatment for tongue-tie. See http://www.lowmilksupply.org/frenotomy.shtml for a list of doctors and dentists who are particularly good at diagnosing and treating tongue-tie.

The first thing to assess is whether your baby can stick out his or her tongue. If you touch your baby's lips, he will probably open his mouth. You can then touch the front of his lower gum with your fingertip. This makes him stick the tongue out. We want to see the tongue come out flat over the lip, without dipping down or pointing down. If your baby can only stick his tongue out when his mouth is closed, that can indicate a posterior (further back) tongue-tie.


Next, we want to see if your baby can lift her tongue way up to the roof of the mouth. All the way up is perfect, half way is enough for most babies to be able to breastfeed. Again, her mouth should be wide open. Most tongue-tied babies can only lift their tongues when their mouths are mostly closed.


Obvious and Sneakier Tongue-ties:

This baby (figure 3) has an obvious tongue-tie. You can see the membrane right at the front of the tongue, and you can see how it makes it hard for him to lift his tongue up.

figure 3

The baby in figure 4 is also tongue-tied. If you run your finger along the outside of a baby's lower gum, her tongue will try to follow. If the tongue twists like this, it's a sign of tongue-tie.

figure 4

The baby in figure 5 has a sneaky (posterior) tongue-tie. You can see that it is difficult to get a finger under the tongue. If you press on the front of the little membrane under the tongue (the frenulum), a tied tongue will pull down in the center like this. This shows that the frenulum is tight and does not allow the tongue to move well. This diagnostic trick is called the Murphy Maneuver after Dr. Jim Murphy of California.

figure 5

Figure 6 shows a very sneaky tongue-tie - a posterior or submucosal one. The frenulum (membrane holding the tongue down) is hiding behind the floor of the mouth (the oral mucosa). You can see that the tongue doesn't lift very well, and that the floor of the mouth is tented out a little.

figure 6
figure 7

Notice how when the baby in figure 6 tries to lift her tongue (figure 7), nothing at all is visible except the limited ability to lift the tongue up.

Again, some babies with posterior or submucosal tongue-tie can breastfeed, others have a lot of difficulty. Moms breast and nipple shape and milk supply can make things easier or more difficult for the baby.

The best way to diagnose a posterior tongue-tie is to lift the tongue with a grooved director. Doctors who treat tongue-tie usually have one.


The final thing to do is watch your baby cry. If only the edges of the tongue curl up like in figure 9, that's a sure sign that the frenulum is tight.

figure 9

Now that you have an idea whether your baby has normal tongue movement ability or not, you can decide what kind of help may be most useful.


You can also take the Tongue-tie symptom questionare at Dr. James Ochi's site http://www.BabyTongueTie.com

A guide to latching your baby

Snuggle your baby against your body so he is tummy to tummy (front to front) and lean back comfortably. Most mothers like to hold the baby with the same side arm as they are nursing from, or with both hands. The more you lean back, the more gravity helps hold baby, and the less strain on your arms.


Babies find the breast by feel and smell. Cuddle your baby in a comfortable position so your nipple touches that cute notch right above her upper lip, and her chin snuggles against your breast.


She will then open her mouth wide.


It will look like she won't be able to get her upper lip past the nipple.

She'll tilt her head back a little bit and lunge in for a good mouthful. If her nose is blocked, snuggle her bottom close to your body and slide her a little toward your other breast.



If this doesn't work for you, try leaning even farther back, so your nipple points up in the air. Then turn your baby so he is laying on your chest, with his face aligned to the breast the same way as in the latch photos above.


If you need to shape your breast a little to define a better mouthful, you can do this with one finger above or below the nipple, or a finger above and a finger below.


If these things don't work, express milk very frequently (at least 8 times a day) to feed your baby, and get in-person help!

Quoting jesuschild06:

Nirmally throughout the feeding but it didnt the first couple. I had no pain the first couple feedings. They said i probably jave pain now because my nipples are sore (they hurt to even touch with my fingers). But i can still feel a difference in the pain from a bad latch and the pain from my nipples being sore. But is it possible to have a lip/tongue tie and the first couple feedings not hurt at all? Ill ask the pediatrition tomorrow to check though.

Quoting gdiamante:

The colostrum will help. Latch can't be evaluated solely through looking at it. Is it hurting throughout the feeding or only at the start? The first is a problem and I'd get baby checked for tongue tie in that case. The second is something that will pass.



Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)