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Oatmeal to increase supply.

Posted by on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:09 AM
  • 28 Replies
I was doing a little research and I read that oatmeal is good for an increase of supply, so were other things but this is the one I wanted more info on. So while it is good for an I crease on supply it does not tell you how to eat it.
I know this may sound dumb but I just rarely eat oatmeal for the simple fact that I do not care for the consistency. I do not like the kind you eat for breakfast, and I don't like how they are in cookies. So with that what other ways can I consume oatmeal?
While I know I talked about oatmeal but I also read that a beer is also good before bed and if you don't want to drink a beer brewers yeast is always good. And of course rest, a good diet and healthy liquids are good. But my sleeping schedule is way off and I'm eating healthy. So I'm just now taking any advise to try something to help.
Im asking Just incase, I have asked already if my supply was low and I also read that just because my boobs are soft, I don't get much while pumping, dd is fussy or pulls away does not mean that my supply is low. But it does say if there is a low diaper count than that can be a sign, so with that and her count being low I just want to check my options out.

Thanks ladies.
by on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:09 AM
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Replies (1-10):
K8wizzo
by Kate on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:35 AM

Granola is excellent (favorite recipe here: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Jennifers-Granola/).  We use oatmeal instead of breadcrumbs in meatballs and meatloaf, either as is or ground in a food processor).  Energy bites: http://smashedpeasandcarrots.blogspot.com/2011/08/no-bake-energy-bites-recipe.html.  Ground oatmeal can be used in place of flour in just about any recipe--you can replace up to 1/3 of the flour without noticing any difference or replace all of it at the texture will be slightly different.

K8wizzo
by Kate on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:36 AM

Increasing Low Milk Supply

AUGUST 10, 2011. Posted in: OLDER INFANT,SUPPLY WORRIES

By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

Image credit: koadmunkee on flickr

Is your milk supply really low?

First of all, is your milk supply really low? Often, mothers think that their milk supply is low when it really isn’t. If your baby is gaining weight well on breastmilk alone, then you donot have a problem with milk supply.

It’s important to note that the feel of the breast, the behavior of your baby, the frequency of nursing, the sensation of let-down, or the amount you pump are not valid ways to determine if you have enough milk for your baby.

What if you’re not quite sure about baby’s current weight gain (perhaps baby hasn’t had a weight check lately)? If baby is having an adequate number of wet and dirty diapers then the following things do NOT mean that you have a low milk supply:

  • Your baby nurses frequently. Breastmilk is digested quickly (usually in 1.5-2 hours), so breastfed babies need to eat more often than formula-fed babies. Many babies have a strong need to suck. Also, babies often need continuous contact with mom in order to feel secure. All these things are normal, and you cannot spoil your baby by meeting these needs.
  • Your baby suddenly increases the frequency and/or length of nursings. This is often a growth spurt. The baby nurses more (this usually lasts a few days to a week), which increases your milk supply. Don’t offer baby supplements when this happens: supplementing will inform your body that the baby doesn’t need the extra milk, and your supply will drop.
  • Your baby nurses more often and is fussy in the evening.
  • Your baby doesn’t nurse as long as she did previously. As babies get older and better at nursing, they become more efficient at extracting milk.
  • Your baby is fussy. Many babies have a fussy time of day – often in the evening. Some babies are fussy much of the time. This can have many reasons, and sometimes the fussiness goes away before you find the reason.
  • Your baby guzzles down a bottle of formula or expressed milk after nursing. Many babies will willingly take a bottle even after they have a full feeding at the breast. Read more here from board-certified lactation consultant Kathy Kuhn about why baby may do this and how this can affect milk supply. Of course, if you regularly supplement baby after nursing, your milk supply will drop (see below).
  • Your breasts don’t leak milk, or only leak a little, or stop leaking. Leaking has nothing to do with your milk supply. It often stops after your milk supply has adjusted to your baby’s needs.
  • Your breasts suddenly seem softer. Again, this normally happens after your milk supply has adjusted to your baby’s needs.
  • You never feel a let-down sensation, or it doesn’t seem as strong as before. Some women never feel a let-down. This has nothing to do with milk supply.
  • You get very little or no milk when you pump. The amount of milk that you can pump is not an accurate measure of your milk supply. A baby with a healthy suck milks your breast much more efficiently than any pump. Also, pumping is an acquired skill (different than nursing), and can be very dependent on the type of pump. Some women who have abundant milk supplies are unable to get any milk when they pump. In addition, it is very common and normal for pumping output to decrease over time.

See also Is my baby getting enough milk?

Who to contact if you suspect low milk supply

If you’re concerned about your milk supply, it will be very helpful to get in touch with a La Leche League Leader or a board certified lactation consultant. If your baby is not gaining weight or is losing weight, you need to keep in close contact with her doctor, since it’s possible that a medical condition can cause this. Supplementing may be medically necessary for babies who are losing weight until your milk supply increases. If supplementing is medically necessary, the best thing to supplement your baby with is your own pumped milk.

Potential causes of low milk supply

These things can cause or contribute to a low milk supply:

  • Supplementing. Nursing is a supply & demand process. Milk is produced as your baby nurses, and the amount that she nurses lets your body know how much milk is required. Every bottle (of formula, juice or water) that your baby gets means that your body gets the signal to produce that much less milk.
  • Nipple confusion. A bottle requires a different type of sucking than nursing, and it is easier for your baby to extract milk from a bottle. As a result, giving a bottle can either cause your baby to have problems sucking properly at the breast, or can result in baby preferring the constant faster flow of the bottle.
  • Pacifiers. Pacifiers can cause nipple confusion. They can also significantly reduce the amount of time your baby spends at the breast, which may cause your milk supply to drop.
  • Nipple shields can lead to nipple confusion. They can also reduce the stimulation to your nipple or interfere with milk transfer, which can interfere with the supply-demand cycle.
  • Scheduled feedings interfere with the supply & demand cycle of milk production and can lead to a reduced supply, sometimes several months later rather than immediately. Nurse your baby whenever she is hungry.
  • Sleepy baby. For the first few weeks, some babies are very sleepy and only demand to nurse infrequently and for short periods. Until baby wakes up and begins to demand regular nursing, nurse baby at least every two hours during the day and at least every 4 hours at night to establish your milk supply.
  • Cutting short the length of nursings. Stopping a feeding before your baby ends the feeding herself can interfere with the supply-demand cycle. Also, your milk increases in fat contentlater into a feeding, which helps baby gain weight and last longer between feedings.
  • Offering only one breast per feeding. This is fine if your milk supply is well-established and your baby is gaining weight well. If you’re trying to increase your milk supply, let baby finish the first side, then offer the second side.
  • Health or anatomical problems with baby can prevent baby from removing milk adequately from the breast, thus decreasing milk supply.
  • Mom’s health (uncontrolled anemia or hypothyroidism, retained placenta, postpartum hemorrhage…), previous breast surgery/injury, hormonal problems (e.g. PCOS), anatomical problems, medications she is taking (hormonal birth controlsudafed…), or smoking also have the potential to affect milk supply.

See Hidden Hindrances to a Healthy Milk Supply from more information on things that can decrease milk supply.

Increasing your milk supply

Milk production is a demand & supply process. If you need to increase milk supply, it’s important to understand how milk is made – understanding this will help you to do the right things to increase production.

To speed milk production and increase overall milk supply, the key is to remove more milk from the breast and to do this frequently, so that less milk accumulates in the breast between feedings.

OK, now on to things that can help increase your milk supply:

  • Make sure that baby is nursing efficiently. This is the “remove more milk” part of increasing milk production. If milk is not effectively removed from the breast, then mom’s milk supply decreases. If positioning and latch are “off” then baby is probably not transferring milk efficiently. A sleepy baby, use of nipple shields or various health or anatomical problems in baby can also interfere with baby’s ability to transfer milk. For a baby who is not nursing efficiently, trying to adequately empty milk from the breast is like trying to empty a swimming pool through a drinking straw – it can take forever. Inefficient milk transfer can lead to baby not getting enough milk or needing to nurse almost constantly to get enough milk. If baby is not transferring milk well, then it is important for mom to express milk after and/or between nursings to maintain milk supply while the breastfeeding problems are being addressed.
  • Nurse frequently, and for as long as your baby is actively nursing. Remember – you want to remove more milk from the breasts and do this frequently. If baby is having weight gain problems, aim to nurse at least every 1.5-2 hours during the day and at least every 3 hours at night.
  • Take a nursing vacation. Take baby to bed with you for 2-3 days, and do nothing but nurse (frequently!) and rest (well, you can eat too!).
  • Offer both sides at each feeding. Let baby finish the first side, then offer the second side.
  • Switch nurse. Switch sides 3 or more times during each feeding, every time that baby falls asleep, switches to “comfort” sucking, or loses interest. Use each side at least twice per feeding. Use breast compression to keep baby feeding longer. For good instructions on how to do this, see Dr. Jack Newman’s Protocol to manage breastmilk intake. This can be particularly helpful for sleepy or distractible babies.
  • Avoid pacifiers and bottles. All of baby’s sucking needs should be met at the breast (see above). If a temporary supplement is medically required, it can be given with a nursing supplementer or by spoon, cup or dropper (see Alternative Feeding Methods).
  • Give baby only breastmilk. Avoid all solids, water, and formula if baby is younger than six months, and consider decreasing solids if baby is older. If you are using more than a few ounces of formula per day, wean from the supplements gradually to “challenge” your breasts to produce more milk.
  • Take care of mom. Rest. Sleep when baby sleeps. Relax. Drink liquids to thirst (don’t force liquids – drinking extra water does not increase supply), and eat a reasonably well-balanced diet.
  • Consider pumping. Adding pumping sessions after or between nursing sessions can be very helpful – pumping is very important when baby is not nursing efficiently or frequently enough, and can speed things up in all situations. Your aim in pumping is to remove more milk from the breasts and/or to increase frequency of breast emptying. When pumping to increase milk supply, to ensure that the pump removes an optimum amount of milk from the breast, keep pumping for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk. However, adding even a short pumping session (increasing frequency but perhaps not removing milk thoroughly) is helpful.
  • Consider a galactagogue. A substance (herb, prescription medication, etc.) that increases milk supply is called a galactagogue. See What is a galactagogue? Do I need one? for more information.

 

Additional information

lilyrose2011
by Member on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:38 AM
Idk if it works the same as eating it like breakfast. But to be healthier someone told me to kind of purée it up and instead of putting bread crumbs in meatloaf substitute it with the powdered oatmeal.
K8wizzo
by Kate on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:39 AM

How old is baby?  What is the diaper count that you're seeing?  Are you a SAHM or are you pumping at work?  How long have you suspected supply issues?  What have you done to address your supply issues?  How frequently is baby nursing?  One side or both each feeding?  What's the weight history look like?  Has baby ever been check for tongue tie or lip tie?

Momof3boyz247
by on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:40 AM
Bumping we are in to same boat hate oatmeal.
redrose_12
by on Jun. 17, 2013 at 8:58 AM
Thank you this is where I got most of my info from that I posted on this site. Except for the oatmeal part.

Quoting K8wizzo:

Increasing Low Milk Supply

AUGUST 10, 2011. Posted in: OLDER INFANT,SUPPLY WORRIES

By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

Image credit: koadmunkee on flickr

Is your milk supply really low?

First of all, is your milk supply really low? Often, mothers think that their milk supply is low when it really isn’t. If your baby is gaining weight well on breastmilk alone, then you donot have a problem with milk supply.

It’s important to note that the feel of the breast, the behavior of your baby, the frequency of nursing, the sensation of let-down, or the amount you pump are not valid ways to determine if you have enough milk for your baby.

What if you’re not quite sure about baby’s current weight gain (perhaps baby hasn’t had a weight check lately)? If baby is having an adequate number of wet and dirty diapers then the following things do NOT mean that you have a low milk supply:

  • Your baby nurses frequently. Breastmilk is digested quickly (usually in 1.5-2 hours), so breastfed babies need to eat more often than formula-fed babies. Many babies have a strong need to suck. Also, babies often need continuous contact with mom in order to feel secure. All these things are normal, and you cannot spoil your baby by meeting these needs.
  • Your baby suddenly increases the frequency and/or length of nursings. This is often a growth spurt. The baby nurses more (this usually lasts a few days to a week), which increases your milk supply. Don’t offer baby supplements when this happens: supplementing will inform your body that the baby doesn’t need the extra milk, and your supply will drop.
  • Your baby nurses more often and is fussy in the evening.
  • Your baby doesn’t nurse as long as she did previously. As babies get older and better at nursing, they become more efficient at extracting milk.
  • Your baby is fussy. Many babies have a fussy time of day – often in the evening. Some babies are fussy much of the time. This can have many reasons, and sometimes the fussiness goes away before you find the reason.
  • Your baby guzzles down a bottle of formula or expressed milk after nursing. Many babies will willingly take a bottle even after they have a full feeding at the breast. Read more here from board-certified lactation consultant Kathy Kuhn about why baby may do this and how this can affect milk supply. Of course, if you regularly supplement baby after nursing, your milk supply will drop (see below).
  • Your breasts don’t leak milk, or only leak a little, or stop leaking. Leaking has nothing to do with your milk supply. It often stops after your milk supply has adjusted to your baby’s needs.
  • Your breasts suddenly seem softer. Again, this normally happens after your milk supply has adjusted to your baby’s needs.
  • You never feel a let-down sensation, or it doesn’t seem as strong as before. Some women never feel a let-down. This has nothing to do with milk supply.
  • You get very little or no milk when you pump. The amount of milk that you can pump is not an accurate measure of your milk supply. A baby with a healthy suck milks your breast much more efficiently than any pump. Also, pumping is an acquired skill (different than nursing), and can be very dependent on the type of pump. Some women who have abundant milk supplies are unable to get any milk when they pump. In addition, it is very common and normal for pumping output to decrease over time.

See also Is my baby getting enough milk?

Who to contact if you suspect low milk supply

If you’re concerned about your milk supply, it will be very helpful to get in touch with a La Leche League Leader or a board certified lactation consultant. If your baby is not gaining weight or is losing weight, you need to keep in close contact with her doctor, since it’s possible that a medical condition can cause this. Supplementing may be medically necessary for babies who are losing weight until your milk supply increases. If supplementing is medically necessary, the best thing to supplement your baby with is your own pumped milk.

Potential causes of low milk supply

These things can cause or contribute to a low milk supply:

  • Supplementing. Nursing is a supply & demand process. Milk is produced as your baby nurses, and the amount that she nurses lets your body know how much milk is required. Every bottle (of formula, juice or water) that your baby gets means that your body gets the signal to produce that much less milk.
  • Nipple confusion. A bottle requires a different type of sucking than nursing, and it is easier for your baby to extract milk from a bottle. As a result, giving a bottle can either cause your baby to have problems sucking properly at the breast, or can result in baby preferring the constant faster flow of the bottle.
  • Pacifiers. Pacifiers can cause nipple confusion. They can also significantly reduce the amount of time your baby spends at the breast, which may cause your milk supply to drop.
  • Nipple shields can lead to nipple confusion. They can also reduce the stimulation to your nipple or interfere with milk transfer, which can interfere with the supply-demand cycle.
  • Scheduled feedings interfere with the supply & demand cycle of milk production and can lead to a reduced supply, sometimes several months later rather than immediately. Nurse your baby whenever she is hungry.
  • Sleepy baby. For the first few weeks, some babies are very sleepy and only demand to nurse infrequently and for short periods. Until baby wakes up and begins to demand regular nursing, nurse baby at least every two hours during the day and at least every 4 hours at night to establish your milk supply.
  • Cutting short the length of nursings. Stopping a feeding before your baby ends the feeding herself can interfere with the supply-demand cycle. Also, your milk increases in fat contentlater into a feeding, which helps baby gain weight and last longer between feedings.
  • Offering only one breast per feeding. This is fine if your milk supply is well-established and your baby is gaining weight well. If you’re trying to increase your milk supply, let baby finish the first side, then offer the second side.
  • Health or anatomical problems with baby can prevent baby from removing milk adequately from the breast, thus decreasing milk supply.
  • Mom’s health (uncontrolled anemia or hypothyroidism, retained placenta, postpartum hemorrhage…), previous breast surgery/injury, hormonal problems (e.g. PCOS), anatomical problems, medications she is taking (hormonal birth controlsudafed…), or smoking also have the potential to affect milk supply.

See Hidden Hindrances to a Healthy Milk Supply from more information on things that can decrease milk supply.

Increasing your milk supply

Milk production is a demand & supply process. If you need to increase milk supply, it’s important to understand how milk is made – understanding this will help you to do the right things to increase production.

To speed milk production and increase overall milk supply, the key is to remove more milk from the breast and to do this frequently, so that less milk accumulates in the breast between feedings.

OK, now on to things that can help increase your milk supply:

  • Make sure that baby is nursing efficiently. This is the “remove more milk” part of increasing milk production. If milk is not effectively removed from the breast, then mom’s milk supply decreases. If positioning and latch are “off” then baby is probably not transferring milk efficiently. A sleepy baby, use of nipple shields or various health or anatomical problems in baby can also interfere with baby’s ability to transfer milk. For a baby who is not nursing efficiently, trying to adequately empty milk from the breast is like trying to empty a swimming pool through a drinking straw – it can take forever. Inefficient milk transfer can lead to baby not getting enough milk or needing to nurse almost constantly to get enough milk. If baby is not transferring milk well, then it is important for mom to express milk after and/or between nursings to maintain milk supply while the breastfeeding problems are being addressed.
  • Nurse frequently, and for as long as your baby is actively nursing. Remember – you want to remove more milk from the breasts and do this frequently. If baby is having weight gain problems, aim to nurse at least every 1.5-2 hours during the day and at least every 3 hours at night.
  • Take a nursing vacation. Take baby to bed with you for 2-3 days, and do nothing but nurse (frequently!) and rest (well, you can eat too!).
  • Offer both sides at each feeding. Let baby finish the first side, then offer the second side.
  • Switch nurse. Switch sides 3 or more times during each feeding, every time that baby falls asleep, switches to “comfort” sucking, or loses interest. Use each side at least twice per feeding. Use breast compression to keep baby feeding longer. For good instructions on how to do this, see Dr. Jack Newman’s Protocol to manage breastmilk intake. This can be particularly helpful for sleepy or distractible babies.
  • Avoid pacifiers and bottles. All of baby’s sucking needs should be met at the breast (see above). If a temporary supplement is medically required, it can be given with a nursing supplementer or by spoon, cup or dropper (see Alternative Feeding Methods).
  • Give baby only breastmilk. Avoid all solids, water, and formula if baby is younger than six months, and consider decreasing solids if baby is older. If you are using more than a few ounces of formula per day, wean from the supplements gradually to “challenge” your breasts to produce more milk.
  • Take care of mom. Rest. Sleep when baby sleeps. Relax. Drink liquids to thirst (don’t force liquids – drinking extra water does not increase supply), and eat a reasonably well-balanced diet.
  • Consider pumping. Adding pumping sessions after or between nursing sessions can be very helpful – pumping is very important when baby is not nursing efficiently or frequently enough, and can speed things up in all situations. Your aim in pumping is to remove more milk from the breasts and/or to increase frequency of breast emptying. When pumping to increase milk supply, to ensure that the pump removes an optimum amount of milk from the breast, keep pumping for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk. However, adding even a short pumping session (increasing frequency but perhaps not removing milk thoroughly) is helpful.
  • Consider a galactagogue. A substance (herb, prescription medication, etc.) that increases milk supply is called a galactagogue. See What is a galactagogue? Do I need one? for more information.

 

Additional information

redrose_12
by on Jun. 17, 2013 at 9:00 AM
I will defenitly try these out. And I do remember a teacher giving us chocolate chip cookies and said that she grinder up oatmeal and put it in the cookies. But ill try that for sure thank you.

Quoting K8wizzo:

Granola is excellent (favorite recipe here: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Jennifers-Granola/).  We use oatmeal instead of breadcrumbs in meatballs and meatloaf, either as is or ground in a food processor).  Energy bites: http://smashedpeasandcarrots.blogspot.com/2011/08/no-bake-energy-bites-recipe.html.  Ground oatmeal can be used in place of flour in just about any recipe--you can replace up to 1/3 of the flour without noticing any difference or replace all of it at the texture will be slightly different.

redrose_12
by on Jun. 17, 2013 at 9:02 AM
I should have been more clear when I wrote breakfast I meant it like instant oatmeal. And yes I will try that out I'd did not know which ways you could eat it unless it was in whole form like in instant, granola, or anyway else. So thank you I will try them out.

Quoting lilyrose2011:

Idk if it works the same as eating it like breakfast. But to be healthier someone told me to kind of purée it up and instead of putting bread crumbs in meatloaf substitute it with the powdered oatmeal.
lilyrose2011
by Member on Jun. 17, 2013 at 9:12 AM
Ya defiantly try it out. It's better for you then breadcrumbs anyways haha and when I eat oatmeal for breakfast I buy the kind that you have to cook for like 5 min and I add fresh strawberries or bananas. The texture is a lil different than instant kind or the one min. Cooking one.

Quoting redrose_12:

I should have been more clear when I wrote breakfast I meant it like instant oatmeal. And yes I will try that out I'd did not know which ways you could eat it unless it was in whole form like in instant, granola, or anyway else. So thank you I will try them out.



Quoting lilyrose2011:

Idk if it works the same as eating it like breakfast. But to be healthier someone told me to kind of purée it up and instead of putting bread crumbs in meatloaf substitute it with the powdered oatmeal.
redrose_12
by on Jun. 17, 2013 at 9:16 AM
She just turned 6 months Saturday.And for the past week or so I noticed it was only about 3 a day including poop. I am a sahm and I've only noticed this for a couple of weeks for it being continuous. I nurse whenever she wakes up, whenever she gets fussy and whenever she shows me that she's hungry so quite a few times a day. I feed on both sides. And I have only done research to see if I have a low supply and for the most part I found that the only way I determined that I had a low supply would be from the diaper count. But other than that it said I can't really tell by the look or feelin of my breasts, if or none let down, nor pumping amount. Only way I guessed it would be from the diaper count.
She just went to the doc on fri and she was weighing in under than she was at her 5month check up. She goes to the doc once a month because she is on medication and although he has not said that he is concerned for her weight but he has said that he would like me to try feeding her formula or solids to up her weight. So with what I read and how I see it I would like to try anything I can to improve her eating habits. I have already introduced her to solids but now I feed her first then give solids if she's still hungry. I really do not want to ff but if I have to ill try and give half and half that way my supply really won't decrease.
So I'm just looking for ways to increase if I actually am low in supply. I will look to see if I can speak with a specialist soon.


Quoting K8wizzo:

How old is baby?  What is the diaper count that you're seeing?  Are you a SAHM or are you pumping at work?  How long have you suspected supply issues?  What have you done to address your supply issues?  How frequently is baby nursing?  One side or both each feeding?  What's the weight history look like?  Has baby ever been check for tongue tie or lip tie?

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