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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

New here and need encouragement!!

Posted by on Jul. 13, 2013 at 8:40 PM
  • 12 Replies
OK. Back story first. I had a breast reduction 12.5 years ago. With my first daughter (08/10) I didn't get any sign of milk whatsoever. I had my second daughter (07/12) and five days postpartum I woke up leaking. By then she was on the bottle so I bought a hand pump and got what I could. Now here I am with our newborn son. I had colostrum and am now getting a supply. Yay!!! But I don't feel like he's getting anywhere near what he needs. He typically will only nurse for 5 minutes and pull off and scream and refuses to relatch. He really only takes to one side but I always offer both. I hurt so bad and he's been attached to me nonstop. We ended up giving him a little bit of formula at 4:00 this morning when I hadn't even been to bed yet because of the latch, release, scream routine. I'm just very discouraged, tired, and sore. But it's not about me. It's about him and my concern that I'm not giving him what he needs :( Any advice??
by on Jul. 13, 2013 at 8:40 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Jul. 13, 2013 at 8:49 PM
I think you may actually have more than you need, as in overactive letdown and possibly oversupply. Try reclined nursing-- you lean back, with him on top of you, with his mouth over rather than under the nipple. Diaper count is the only accurate measure of what he's getting. If he is under a week, you want one diaper per day of life, with a couple of quarter sized poops each day. At a week, look for a minimum of 6 diapers in 24 hours with the same poops as mentioned before. Extra wet and poopy count as two diapers. Has he been checked for lip or tongue ties? There are excellent articles on kellymom.com for managing OAL/oversupply and identifying ties. Let us know how we can be of further help!
SteffM0501
by on Jul. 13, 2013 at 11:45 PM

Sounds like OAL, that's what I've been dealing with. It got so bad I now have to pump a few minutes before feedings just to get the flow under control. Aubrey preferred one nipple's flow to the other and now we exclusively breastfeed on the right breast (the left one is now officially for show only). As far as the length of time spent nursing, Aubrey only nurses for about five to ten minutes even with the controlled milk flow, but she's consistently gaining weight so neither myself nor her pediatrician are concerned, she's just a very efficient nurser.

gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Jul. 13, 2013 at 11:50 PM

Yep. It's not that he's not getting what he needs but that he's getting too much!

aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Jul. 14, 2013 at 1:39 AM

http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/fast-letdown/


Forceful Let-down (Milk Ejection Reflex) & Oversupply

August 20, 2011. Posted in: Supply worries

By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

 Is forceful let-down the problem?

Does your baby do any of these things?

If some of this sounds familiar to you, you probably have a forceful let-down. This is often associated with too much milk (oversupply). Some mothers notice that the problems with fast letdown or oversupply don’t start until 3-6 weeks of age. Forceful let-down runs the gamut from a minor inconvenience to a major problem, depending upon how severe it is and how it affects the nursing relationship.

What can I do about it?

There are essentially two ways you can go about remedying a forceful let-down: (1) help baby deal with the fast flow and (2) take measures to adjust your milk supply down to baby’s needs. Since forceful let-down is generally a byproduct of oversupply, most moms will be working on both of these things. It may take a couple of weeks to see results from interventions for oversupply, so try to be patient and keep working on it.

Help baby deal with the fast milk flow

  • Position baby so that she is nursing “uphill” in relation to mom’s breast, where gravity is working againstthe flow of milk. The most effective positions are those where baby’s head and throat are above the level of your nipple. Some nursing positions to try:
    • Cradle hold, but with mom leaning back (a recliner or lots of pillows helps)
    • Football hold, but with mom leaning back
    • Elevated football hold – like the football hold, but baby is sitting up and facing mom to nurse instead of lying down (good for nursing in public).
    • Side lying position – this allows baby to dribble the extra milk out of her mouth when it’s coming too fast
    • Australian position (mom is “down under”, aka posture feeding) – in this position, mom is lying on her back and baby is on top (facing down), tummy to tummy with mom. Avoid using this positioning frequently, as it may lead to plugged ducts.
  • Burp baby frequently if she is swallowing a lot of air.
  • Nurse more frequently. This will reduce the amount of milk that accumulates between feedings, so feedings are more manageable for baby.
  • Nurse when baby is sleepy and relaxed. Baby will suck more gently at this time, and the milk flow will be slower.
  • Wait until let-down occurs, then take baby off the breast while at the same time catching the milk in a towel or cloth diaper. Once the flow slows, you can put your baby back to the breast.
  • Pump or hand express until the flow of milk slows down, and then put baby to the breast. Use this only if nothing else is working, as it stimulates additional milk production. If you do this, try to express a little less milk each time until you are no longer expressing before nursing.

Adjust your supply to better match baby’s needs

  • If baby is gaining weight well, then having baby nurse from only one breast per feeding can be helpful.
  • If baby finishes nursing on the first side and wants to continue nursing, just put baby back onto the first side.
  • If the second side becomes uncomfortable, express a little milk until you’re more comfortable and then use cool compresses – aim for expressing less milk each time until you are comfortable without expressing milk.
  • Avoid extra breast stimulation, for example, unnecessary pumping, running the shower on your breasts for a long time or wearing breast shells.
  • Between feedings, try applying cool compresses to the breast (on for 30 minutes, off for at least an hour). This can discourage blood flow and milk production.
  • If nursing one side per feeding is not working after a week or so, try keeping baby to one side for a certain period of time before switching sides. This is called block nursing.
  • Start with 2-3 hours and increase in half-hour increments if needed.
  • Do not restrict nursing at all, but any time that baby needs to nurse simply keep putting baby back to the same side during that time period.
  • If the second side becomes uncomfortable, express a little milk until you’re more comfortable and then use cool compresses – aim for expressing less milk each time until you are comfortable without expressing milk.
  • In more extreme cases, mom may need to experiment a bit with time periods over 4 hours to find the amount of time per breast that works best.
  • Additional measures that should only be used for extreme cases of oversupply include cabbage leaf compresses and herbs.

Even if these measures do not completely solve the problem, many moms find that their abundant supply and fast let-down will subside, at least to some extent, by about 12 weeks (give or take a bit). At this point, hormonal changes occur that make milk supply more stable and more in line with the amount of milk that baby needs.

Sometimes babies of moms with oversupply or fast let-down get very used to the fast flow and object when it normally slows somewhere between 3 weeks to 3 months. Even though your let-down may not be truly slow, it can still seem that way to baby. See Let-down Reflex: Too Slow? for tips.

aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Jul. 14, 2013 at 1:40 AM

Have you checked out bfar.org?

melindabelcher
by mel on Jul. 14, 2013 at 6:29 AM
How are diapers?
Augmama2be
by on Jul. 14, 2013 at 8:41 AM
Diapers have been good. He's down 12.5 oz from birth weight (as of yesterday). If I had an over supply, wouldn't pumping provide a good amount? I only get drops when pumping...
stepconfused182
by Kelley on Jul. 14, 2013 at 9:20 AM
No. Pumping only tells you one thing- how much you can pump! It has no relevance to how much your baby can remove from your breast. You shouldn't be pumping at all at this point and that is likely the reason for the oversupply (with the exception of when you gave the bottle of formula- anytime a bottle is given, you need to pump for that missed feeding). Hold off pumping until supply is established and regulated by baby. This is usually around 6-8 weeks.

Quoting Augmama2be:

Diapers have been good. He's down 12.5 oz from birth weight (as of yesterday). If I had an over supply, wouldn't pumping provide a good amount? I only get drops when pumping...
Augmama2be
by on Jul. 14, 2013 at 9:46 AM
I only pump to finish out my breast per what my lc told me. I feed it to him in a syringe. We figured all odds were against us so the plan was to establish a supply.

Quoting stepconfused182:

No. Pumping only tells you one thing- how much you can pump! It has no relevance to how much your baby can remove from your breast. You shouldn't be pumping at all at this point and that is likely the reason for the oversupply (with the exception of when you gave the bottle of formula- anytime a bottle is given, you need to pump for that missed feeding). Hold off pumping until supply is established and regulated by baby. This is usually around 6-8 weeks.



Quoting Augmama2be:

Diapers have been good. He's down 12.5 oz from birth weight (as of yesterday). If I had an over supply, wouldn't pumping provide a good amount? I only get drops when pumping...
dleon621
by on Jul. 14, 2013 at 10:01 AM
I agree with all the ladies, what you can try is to pump before you nurse or when you feel the let down open the baby jaw and let it spray in a bottle so that u can store it or in a towel.then continue feeding
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