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How to increase milk supply

Posted by on Jul. 24, 2013 at 7:38 AM
  • 11 Replies
My baby girl is 2 monthz old m breastfeeding but giving formula as well.. Can she switch now to exclusive breastfeed?
by on Jul. 24, 2013 at 7:38 AM
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Replies (1-10):
MusherMaggie
by Ruby Member on Jul. 24, 2013 at 8:02 AM
How much supplement is she getting each day?
melindabelcher
by mel on Jul. 24, 2013 at 8:57 AM
Why are you supplementing? How often and how much? Have you been pumping at all?
suetoo
by on Jul. 24, 2013 at 9:01 AM
1 mom liked this

Absolutely! Just nurse her instead of bottle. It's law of supply and demand. The more nursing the more milk! 

Shyamli
by on Jul. 24, 2013 at 9:02 AM
Shes taking 2-3 feeds of 120ml each day.. Pumping helps?
K8wizzo
by Kate on Jul. 24, 2013 at 9:17 AM

Weaning from formula supplements

AUGUST 26, 2011. Posted in: COMMON NEWBORN CONCERNS,SUPPLY BASICS

Put baby to breast often

Aim for 10 breastfeeding sessons per day. If baby is not breastfeeding well, work with your lactation consultant.

Image credit: Jerry Bunkers on flickr

Method for weaning from supplements

Do not drop supplements suddenly – this should be a gradual process.

  1. Prepare: Talk to baby’s health care provider and get his/her input. Record supplement amounts for a few days to determine how much supplement baby is getting per day. Use expressed milk for supplements if available. If you don’t have enough expressed milk, add banked milk or formula.
  2. Days 1-3: Take the current supplement amount (#1) and reduce by 1 oz (30 mL). Note that you’re not reducing 1 oz at every feeding, but 1 oz over the entire day. Monitor baby’s wet & dirty diapers. If diaper count is good, then do not exceed this amount of supplement each day – keep putting baby back to the breast if he wants to eat more.
  3. Days 4-6: Take the current supplement amount (#2) and reduce by 1 oz (30 mL). Monitor baby’s wet & dirty diapers. If diaper count is good, then do not exceed this amount of supplement each day – keep putting baby back to the breast if he wants to eat more.
  4. Days 7-9: Take the current supplement amount (#3) and reduce by 1-2 oz (30-60 mL) – try 2 oz if things are going well. Monitor baby’s wet & dirty diapers. If diaper count is good, then do not exceed this amount of supplement each day – keep putting baby back to the breast if he wants to eat more.
  5. Continue the above method, slowly reducing the amount of supplement every 2-3 days as long as baby’s diaper count and weight gain indicate that he’s getting enough milk. Once you get to the point that the supplements are only expressed milk (no formula), then you can usually proceed at a faster pace–at this point you are making enough milk for baby and just need to transition baby to getting milk only at the breast (when not separated from mom).
  6. If baby’s weight gain or diaper count are borderline or inappropriate, then spend several more days at the same supplement level, or return to the previous supplement level and proceed at a slower pace.
  7. Monitor baby’s growth. Weigh baby at least once a week to ensure that he is gaining appropriately. Get another weight check a week after baby is completely back to the breast, to reassure yourself that things are going well. Keep in touch with baby’s health care provider throughout this process.

Pump to increase supply

  • Pumping will help you to increase supply faster, plus you will be able to use your milk instead of formula for any needed supplements. Your aim in pumping is to remove more milk from the breasts and/or to empty the breasts more often. The more milk you remove, the more milk you will produce.
  • A hospital-grade double pump will save time and maximize your pumping efforts.
  • Until supply is well established, it is important to get at least eight good nursing and/or pumping sessions per 24 hours. Ten sessions per day is better.
  • If baby does not breastfeed at a feeding, pump for 20-30 minutes, or for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk. If baby breastfeeds, but does not soften the breast well, pump for 10-15 minutes after nursing. If baby softens the breast well, then adding pumping sessions betweenbreastfeeding sessions is most helpful.
  • Empty the breast as thoroughly as possible at each session. To ensure that the pump removes an optimum amount of milk from the breast, keep pumping for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk. Use breast massage prior to pumping, and massage and compressions during pumping to better empty the breasts and increase pumping output.

This method of reducing supplements was adapted from the methods used by Kathy Kuhn — Thanks, Kathy!

Go to PDF Breastfeeding Log – Weaning from supplements

Go to professional handouts to view handouts on weaning from supplements

More information on transitioning baby back to breastfeeding

@ other websites

Junebaby18
by Nannerz on Jul. 24, 2013 at 12:33 PM
Quoting Shyamli:

Shes taking 2-3 feeds of 120ml each day.. Pumping helps?


Just replace those bottle feedings with nursing. She may act starved still after nursing one side so you can offer the other side after burping well. If still acting hungry, give side 1 again and then side 2, repeating until baby wants no more.
tabi_cat1023
by Group Admin -Tabitha on Jul. 24, 2013 at 1:08 PM

120ml thats 4 oz...so about 8 oz a day...try cutting them out totally but if its just too miserable gradually cut things back to 3oz a feed then 2 oz a feed then 1 oz a feed and then nothing over a period of a week.  YOu want to nurse before these bottles for sure too, your body should be able to catch up without an issue but this is a just in case

melindabelcher
by mel on Jul. 24, 2013 at 2:20 PM

4oz is more then a full feeding for a breastfed baby.

Is that bottle given after nursing or in place of?

Shyamli
by on Jul. 25, 2013 at 4:58 AM
At times in place of at times after nursing.. She sleeps while taking my feed so shes never full with my feed.. I try waking her up but no use.. Get really tired at times.. Lol
polkaspots
by on Jul. 25, 2013 at 5:30 AM
That's what babies do, they fall asleep at the breast. She's getting enough. She shouldn't be getting four ounces ever. Make the bottles an ounce smaller and drop one every few days. You'll be completely breastfeeding within a week. I know it's easier to make 4oz instead of three, but you can make six ounces at a time and split the formula in half to get two bottles. That's a very small amount of formula to be giving in a day because you don't have a supply problem. You are just a little misinformed about how a bf baby eats. They nurse and sleep and nurse and sleep constantly. If she is resistant to being woken up to nurse, it's because she isn't hungry. Keep track of diapers to help yourself feel confident in what you're doing. I don't know how old your baby is so I don't know how many wets you need in a day, but kellymom has it.
Last bit, if you give a bottle in place of nursing you have to pump. That's a rule to follow for at least six months because of the dangers of supply decrease.


Quoting Shyamli:

At times in place of at times after nursing.. She sleeps while taking my feed so shes never full with my feed.. I try waking her up but no use.. Get really tired at times.. Lol

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