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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

new here and nervous....

Posted by on Aug. 20, 2013 at 12:44 PM
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hi all my name is amanda im 25 and due December 16'2013 im planning on breastfeeding but very nervous.. I have heard lots of horror stories about breast feeding and starting out and honestly am overwhelmed with all the info im findung and reading... I want to be prepared but not overwhelmed I would love to read pointers and the must knows dos n donts from real women so if any of u have advice for an expexting mom please share thank u abd I look forward to getting to kno everyone
by on Aug. 20, 2013 at 12:44 PM
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gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Aug. 20, 2013 at 1:02 PM


Quoting MrsCarnes88:

hi all my name is amanda im 25 and due December 16'2013
Welcome. And THANK YOU for working on getting info EARLY. Tell yoru pregnant friends to do the same. Baby doesn't give a darn whether the nursery is in Winnie the Pooh or World of Warcraft, and if you dress him in identical sleepers every day he won't care. But he DOES care about eating! **smile**
im planning on breastfeeding but very nervous.. I have heard lots of horror stories about breast feeding
Many of them are actually because of a LACK of information. So you've taken the correct first step.
and starting out and honestly am overwhelmed with all the info im findung and reading... I want to be prepared but not overwhelmed I would love to read pointers and the must knows dos n donts from real women so if any of u have advice for an expexting mom please share thank u abd I look forward to getting to kno everyone

Let me point you to the ONE book that's best for you to read for basics. Other books are nice but start slow.

The book is "So That's What They're For" by Janet Tamaro. It's a great basic book.

Things you need to know to start:

The only things you need to breastfeed are at least one breast and one baby. Also highly advised to have the number of an Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). Everything else is optional. Nice to have: Sling, lanolin or other breastfeeding nipple cream, cloth diapers for catching spills (and there will be spills).

Things to evict from your home: Clocks and formula. No timing allowed (ignore anyone who tells you otherwise) and formula can set you up for failure.

In week one: Put baby to breast ASAP after giving birth, and DO NOT let baby out of your sight. No nursery. Room in.  Expect baby to LOSE weight in week one. 10-12% of birth weight, in fact, depending on the delivery. Look for ONE dipe change per day of life, and as week one goes on look for two quarter-sized poops per day in that count. The dipe count is the ONLY indication of supply. Pump output tells you nothing.

YOu may experience nipple soreness. That's where the lanolin comes in. If you experience anything beyond some discomfort at initial latch, then there's a latch problem and you need to see that IBCLC.

In week two and beyond: Dipe count goes to 6-8 changes per day. Baby starts gaining at a rate of 4-6 ounces per week. 

At three weeks, baby will become a very unpleasant demanding demon child. **grin** Welcome to the three week growth spurt. Just nurse. The more demanding baby is the better. DO NOT look for "satisfied." It's not in baby's programming. Demanding babies ARE getting enough as long as the dipe count is good. 

At the end of the spurt, baby will sleep and outgrow everything. (Which is why identical onesies start looking attractive... you don't have to mourn the cute outfits he never got to wear!)

Brace yourself: There's another spurt at six weeks!


That's for starters. Pick uyp that book, then just hang out here. In one week of reading you'll know more than your doc does on this subject.

MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 1:07 PM
Tell yourself you will breastfeed. Tell everyone who is around you, everyone at the OB office, and anyone who comes near you at the hospital. If the amount of information is overwhelmimg you, stick with one book, "So That's What They're For" by Janet Tamaro. Read it and take it with you to the hospital. Keep the baby close to you, on you, skin-to-skin. Diaper count is the only accurate indication of what baby is taking in. First week--1 diaper on day 1, 2 on day 2, etc. After the first week, 6-8 in 24 hours with at least two quarter-sized poops. Be aware that most doctors know little or nothing about breastfeeding--do not rely on them for nutrition help. If you do need help, come here and also seek out the help of an IBCLC.
steffiecox
by Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 1:26 PM
Its good to prepare and get informtion ahead of time. Do you have wic? The wic office I go to gave me books and dvds on breastfeeding which was helpful for me. If would be helpful to go ahead and find LC in your area. Find one that is available during the night too.

Breastfeeding is harder for some then others. I had difficultly breastfeeding at first. I stuck with it and I'm glad I did. The struggle I went through was well worth.
armywife2408
by Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 2:46 PM
Don't have back up formula, its can be to eat to turn to. Don't time your feedings, feed on demand. Try feeding the first time within ten minutes after birth. Keep the baby close to you, i recommend a ring sling or ergo, this will help with supply. Don't let others talk you into writing breastfeeding because of their opinions. Don't expect it to be easy right away. Most of all enjoy your bonding time with your LO. This group of ladies are also wonderful support when things get hard.
Astrachanca
by Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 2:54 PM
First few days after baby is born all you will have is colostrum. It's a tiny amount of food your baby will be getting but their tummies are tiny, the size of a marble. Just keep breastfeeding as often as baby wants and your milk supply will come in. I was sort of shocked at how little they actually eat at first but your colostrum is packed with calories! :)
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mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Aug. 20, 2013 at 3:43 PM
Sometimes I swear I was lucky to NOT know anyone who'd ever breastfed because I was spared those stories! Nurse on demand, even if the baby just demanded a half hour ago. Fussy babies are great from stimulating supply. And fussy is normal and doesn't mean they're starving. Watch diapers because If you see it coming out you know it's going in. And check and see if your hospital's childbirth education department offers a breastfeeding moms support group that you can drop in as often as you have questions or just enjoy the company of other breastfeeding moms.
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